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Two Male Dogs????

rosebury29
February 26th, 2008, 07:59 AM
We have a male choc lab (2 years) and just got a male doberman (12 weeks). The breeder knew about our other dog and was happy about it. Anyway, both boys get along great. They play and aren't bothered by each others company at all. My lab is extremely submissive and sociable so even if the Doberman wants to be the dominant one in the future I don't think our Lab will put up too much fuss.
People keep telling me though that they'll kill each other once the Doberman matures. That it's impossible to keep a Doberman with any other male dog.

Does anyone have two males that get along? Anyone with a doberman and another male?

I really hope growing up together since the doberman was a pup will keep their relationship positive. Is their any hope or will I be forced to choose one dog in the future?

hazelrunpack
February 26th, 2008, 08:24 AM
It sounds like there is a lot of misinformation out there about dobies. Stereotypes are just as misleading about dog breeds as they are about ethnic groups. I've never had a doberman, but I know people who have. Some of them had other male dogs of different breeds at the same time and no one had any problems.

Given what you say about your lab's temperament, it doesn't sound like you're setting yourself up for trouble. Even if your lab was dominant, he and the pup would likely work things out long before the dobie was full-grown. Age is very potent among dogs. I knew a fairly alpha 125-lb malamute/collie who was totally dominated by a 30-pound cocker/poodle mix--mostly by dint of the fact that the smaller dog was older and already in the home before the big guy came to live there as a wee puppy.

So I wouldn't worry. There are no guarantees, of course, that any two dogs will get along, but it doesn't sound like your two are showing much sign of not liking each other. :shrug:

Let them work out their relationship on their own. They'll play, and probably play rough, but it's a way for them to size each other up. As long as no one is getting hurt, they're doing good and you don't need to worry.

And of course, we're going to demand some pictures of them playing! :D So start picking out your favorite photos now! :thumbs up

LavenderRott
February 26th, 2008, 09:05 AM
It has nothing to do with breed and MUCH more to do with individual dogs. I know many people who have two (or more) dogs of the same sex in their home with no problems. And I know people who have dogs of the same sex in their home that need to be "managed".

Only time will tell and it will depend entirely on the temperment of the dogs involved.

And don't be surprised if it is a few years from now before you have any problems, if you are going to have any problems. You are more likely to run into issues as your pup reaches adulthood.

Ford Girl
February 26th, 2008, 02:36 PM
I agree, breed doesn't have much to do with it...I would suggest nuturing your pup as early as possible so he doesn't reach sexual maturity, that should help alot. If left intact that get their tails in a knot as hormones fly around sending off messages to other dogs... :) They are quicker to react and act on behaviors and challanges.

I agree, the teenager/adolencent stage will be the time to test out his new pack...just do some research on puppy devolpment and the stages they go thru.

And with both dogs, just make sure you keep them in line, you are their leader so neither of them need to step up to that role. Control things like meal time and resource guarding. Puppies in general can be demanding and little :censored:'s...but your lab sounds like he'd be tolerent. :cloud9:

les
February 26th, 2008, 02:52 PM
I have 2 males and 1 female. I had the female first, brought in the first male who was 5 months at the time when the female was 10 months. They're 4 yrs and 3.5 years now. I brought home the next male about 5 months ago when he was 1 year.

My first male is not dominant really but he won't tolerate being dominated by another dog. The new guy is somewhat dominant - more at least then my other 2 so I do have to keep an eye on the boys. They are fine when I go out and I don't separate them but I can NOT board them at the boarding kennel together! The last time I did they had a fight while in the cage and the new guy suffered the injuries (nothing serious, just a few cuts and scrapes) even though I'm pretty sure he would have started it.

So I just pay attention when there are bones out. I do feed them right beside each other and I've never had a problem - I'm always right there though and maybe that's why.

I too would suggest to make sure both dogs respect you as the pack leader so they don't feel the need to fill that position themselves =)

bendyfoot
February 26th, 2008, 03:30 PM
We have a very dominant female dog, who GENERALLY didn't get along with other females (or any dog, for that matter), but we now have two very happy girl dogs in the house who are best buddies. There's lots of play fighting and feigned aggression (teeth baring, growling over toys, etc.) but for our girls, it's just the way the interact and actually part of their play.

Ford Girl
February 26th, 2008, 03:34 PM
We have a very dominant female dog, who GENERALLY didn't get along with other females (or any dog, for that matter), but we now have two very happy girl dogs in the house who are best buddies. There's lots of play fighting and feigned aggression (teeth baring, growling over toys, etc.) but for our girls, it's just the way the interact and actually part of their play.

Thats an excellent point to bring up too...when they play they release alot of energy and can play different then their personalities, sometimes it look rough and violent, but it's usually play. Teeth and snarls...there was a good thread on here not long ago about that...

My girls doesn't like other strange dogs in general...but those dogs who have entered her life thru friends and fmaily, she doesn't show any of her nasty side to them, your lab being a good sport about most things will help show your pup how to cope and release that energy thru play...:thumbs up

clm
February 26th, 2008, 09:28 PM
The only breed I've ever heard of being consistantly hard to get along, male to male are malamutes. Even some female Mals can be difficult with other dogs. I often wonder if it's because they're so close to the wolf in make up because otherwise they really are gentle giants.
I don't think you're going to have any trouble with your lab, he sounds pretty mellow. Once the dobie is full grown, you may see a shift in who the pack leader is. My 2 dogs who are a few months apart in age play fight all the time. Now and again it gets a little too rough and I'll intervene. The smallest one is the dominant one.
Both of your breeds are pretty active, dobies are usually a little more restless, always on the move, but I've known lots of them and have never met an aggressive one yet.

Cindy

MIA
February 26th, 2008, 09:33 PM
Male dobermans tend to be more dog aggressive BUT not all of them are, I am sure that's what people are referring to, the breeder, hopefully a good one wouldn't place the dog with you if they didn't feel it was ok. Socialize your pup well and do everything you can to ensure he's a balanced dog and hopefully all will be well.

Ford Girl
February 27th, 2008, 10:31 AM
Male dobermans tend to be more dog aggressive BUT not all of them are, I am sure that's what people are referring to, the breeder, hopefully a good one wouldn't place the dog with you if they didn't feel it was ok. Socialize your pup well and do everything you can to ensure he's a balanced dog and hopefully all will be well.

I think with a general statement like this the word aggressive isn't appropriate, I would use protective and loyal instead...to describe the breed. Aggression is an act/reaction or response or behavior, every breed can show aggression. They are a guardian breed, they have come a long way from the original dobies...they are more social and friendly. I watched a great show about them on Animal Planet, called Breed All About It. Very interesting.

We have friends with a large male doby, he's a rescue, what a love bug :lovestruck:...he plays very well with female dogs and submissive males, but constantly pushes it with male dogs that won't submit right away...and when he reacts it's pretty scarey. With human's he's excellent, a real wiggle butt cutie...until his owners had a baby...now he's over protective and will react towards humans if he doesn't know you 100%...he's bitten before, a person who reached out for the baby...hard too, left scars, all teeth and shook...it was really bad. (I think the decrease in exercise and attention leaves them to obsess a little more about whats going on in the house)

The only reason I mentioned this was to say that they are guardians and very protective and loyal to their pack, you need to make sure they don't cross that line of over protective, cuz they will, at no fault of their own, they are just doing their job. :shrug:

He knows my DH and I, and he lets in in his space, hold the baby, what ever we want, no problems at all, but he's weary of strangers...we actually pick him up Thursday to stay with us until Monday cuz his humans had to go to a funeral out of province. I will get some pics of this love bug...:lovestruck: he really is a big goof. :crazy:

MIA
February 27th, 2008, 11:00 AM
Ford Girl, Male Dobes CAN be dog aggressive, ask any dobe breeder or dobe person, they tend to be more so than the females. I have been working with Dobe rescue now for many years and am active with the breed. I didn't say they were an aggresive breed.

Ford Girl
February 27th, 2008, 12:06 PM
Ford Girl, Male Dobes CAN be dog aggressive, ask any dobe breeder or dobe person, they tend to be more so than the females. I have been working with Dobe rescue now for many years and am active with the breed. I didn't say they were an aggresive breed.

Coolio, my appolgies for misunderstanding. :) My point was any breed or sex CAN BE dog aggressive.

pitgrrl
February 27th, 2008, 12:35 PM
I have two male littermates who, generally speaking, don't get along too well with other males, but adore each other. Even though I've never had a problem between them, I'm still proactive in how they are managed together.

For example, high value toys or treats are only given under supervision, meal times are supervised, rough playing is monitored and they're told to take a break if it gets too intense. They're also separated when left alone for any period of time.

I think all these measures have definately allowed the dogs to live in peace, along with some luck.

MIA
February 27th, 2008, 12:43 PM
Sure any breed CAN be but some are more predisposed for certain traits. Labs for insistence tend NOT to be dog aggressive at all. MinPins tend NOT to be dog aggressive, Pit Bulls tend to be dog aggressive, etc. Each breed does have breed specific characteristics that one needs to take into consideration and keep in the back of ones mind and be aware of.