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Can someone look this over for me?

Colubridz
February 23rd, 2008, 01:48 AM
I've begun a writing campaign to my city officials, and local news and print after two dogs in the last month have been put on death row for looking like PitBull's.

What I have suggested in my letter is simply something I think would have potential in providing a practical solution to BSL for both owners and city officials. If you don't agree with something I've suggested I'd love to discuss it but please keep pitbull ban debates out of this thread, there are plenty to battle it out in, I would like to keep this thread for suggestion and open discussion for those intrested in fighting BSL.

Thanks
Kayla


Dear Mayor Hazel McCallion,

I am a resident of your city and I write to you today with a solution for the cities Pit Bull Problem. If you will indulge me, I am not a professional dog trainer, but I do work around a variety of animals all day long at a locally owned pet shop on Dundas Street East and Dixie Road. I own a dog and am actively involved with Dog Obedience.

As you are well aware the problem of Pit Bull’s is once again at the cities door step after a young Pit Bull named Rambo recently made headlines and have sparked debates after he was caught at large. I am completely opposed to Bill 132, Ontario’s Infamous Pit Bull Ban but this is not why I write you today, for there are many others to raise their voice over this. I write you today to offer a suggestion: Regulate the source of our domestic pals, and curb dog attack’s ten fold.

Years of research by Canadian and Global Applied Animal Behaviouralists have all conclusively proven time and time again that genetic disposition is a result of many factors none which are breed specific.

Taken from the Canadian Kennel Club’s website,

“The Canadian Kennel Club supports dangerous and/or vicious dog legislation, which would serve to protect the public from dangerous dogs. The Canadian Kennel Club does not support breed-specific legislation. The Canadian Kennel Club's opposition to breed-specific legislation is based on the fact that a dangerous temperament is a product of many factors, and not by breed alone. Thus, breed-specific legislation may include dogs which are not dangerous, while excluding those which are."

Eliminating sources such as pet stores, farms, flea markets, puppy mills along with outlawing the selling of unregistered Canadian Kennel Club Puppies in newspaper ads, online websites and other print and electronic sources will effectively solve the problem which the keeping of domestic dogs presents to public safety.

The reason I have chosen the Canadian Kennel Club as a model for acting as a registry for dogs to be bred, is because they were created in 1887, over one hundred years ago for that exact purpose, to promote responsible breeding and ownership. This also eliminates the need to speed time and money to create a new registry. In additions animal rescues and humane societies should still be allowed to adopt out abandoned dogs, both of mixed and pure breed provided the dogs are of good temperment.

One, it will effectively snuff out unregulated breeding of adult dogs who have not been properly temperament tested, drastically reducing the risk of aggressive dogs being purchased by discouraging undesirable traits from being passed from parent to offspring.

Two, it will increase the likelihood of successful placements of dogs in homes which are properly educated on how to raise and train a dog which shows no serious aggression towards human’s except when defending it’s property.

The reason I have chosen the Canadian Kennel Club as a model for acting as a registry for dogs to be bred, is because they were created in 1887, over one hundred years ago for that exact purpose, to promote responsible breeding and ownership. This also eliminates the need to speed time and money to create a new registry. In additions animal rescues and humane societies should still be allowed to adopt out abandoned dogs, both of mixed and pure breed provided the dogs are of good temperment.

Other long-term outcomes include:

-Decrease in amount of abandoned pets, due to increased owner education at time of purchase/ adoption.

-Effectively end the plethora of puppy mills situated across Ontario, most whom rarely meet minimum care standards.

-Prevent a rabies outbreak by breeding vaccinated adult dogs and informing new owners as to the importance of vaccinations.

Thanks for your time,

Sincerely
Kayla Elizabeth Young, 18

TeriM
February 23rd, 2008, 02:30 AM
I commend you for your attempt to help stop BSL but I did find the letter a bit confusing. You do have the "The reason I have chosen the Canadian Kennel Club" section in the letter twice and I think the "other outcomes" section should definately not make any mention of breeding adult dogs just because they might be vaccinated. People are stupid and could take that statement to validate their own breeding circumstances.

I think you would have better luck with focusing on the section that would ban "pet stores, farms, flea markets, puppy mills" as this is an area that could be legislated. I would also make mention of the well-meaning back yard breeder who may be unwittingly adding to the problem as well. You could expand it to show why these "breeders" are doing so much to add to the problem of dangerous dogs (poor health, bad conditions, overbreeding, uneducated owners and purchasers etc.) It would be next to impossible to legislate control over internet and other advertising methods.

Good luck.

pbpatti
February 23rd, 2008, 02:33 AM
I've begun a writing campaign to my city officials, and local news and print after two dogs in the last month have been put on death row for looking like PitBull's.

What I have suggested in my letter is simply something I think would have potential in providing a practical solution to BSL for both owners and city officials. If you don't agree with something I've suggested I'd love to discuss it but please keep pitbull ban debates out of this thread, there are plenty to battle it out in, I would like to keep this thread for suggestion and open discussion for those intrested in fighting BSL.

Thanks
Kayla


Dear Mayor Hazel McCallion,

I am a resident of your city and I write to you today with a solution for the cities Pit Bull Problem. If you will indulge me, I am not a professional dog trainer, but I do work around a variety of animals all day long at a locally owned pet shop on Dundas Street East and Dixie Road. I own a dog and am actively involved with Dog Obedience.

As you are well aware the problem of Pit Bull’s is once again at the cities door step after a young Pit Bull named Rambo recently made headlines and have sparked debates after he was caught at large. I am completely opposed to Bill 132, Ontario’s Infamous Pit Bull Ban but this is not why I write you today, for there are many others to raise their voice over this. I write you today to offer a suggestion: Regulate the source of our domestic pals, and curb dog attack’s ten fold.

Years of research by Canadian and Global Applied Animal Behaviouralists have all conclusively proven time and time again that genetic disposition is a result of many factors none which are breed specific.

Taken from the Canadian Kennel Club’s website,

“The Canadian Kennel Club supports dangerous and/or vicious dog legislation, which would serve to protect the public from dangerous dogs. The Canadian Kennel Club does not support breed-specific legislation. The Canadian Kennel Club's opposition to breed-specific legislation is based on the fact that a dangerous temperament is a product of many factors, and not by breed alone. Thus, breed-specific legislation may include dogs which are not dangerous, while excluding those which are."

Eliminating sources such as pet stores, farms, flea markets, puppy mills along with outlawing the selling of unregistered Canadian Kennel Club Puppies in newspaper ads, online websites and other print and electronic sources will effectively solve the problem which the keeping of domestic dogs presents to public safety.

The reason I have chosen the Canadian Kennel Club as a model for acting as a registry for dogs to be bred, is because they were created in 1887, over one hundred years ago for that exact purpose, to promote responsible breeding and ownership. This also eliminates the need to speed time and money to create a new registry. In additions animal rescues and humane societies should still be allowed to adopt out abandoned dogs, both of mixed and pure breed provided the dogs are of good temperment.

One, it will effectively snuff out unregulated breeding of adult dogs who have not been properly temperament tested, drastically reducing the risk of aggressive dogs being purchased by discouraging undesirable traits from being passed from parent to offspring.

Two, it will increase the likelihood of successful placements of dogs in homes which are properly educated on how to raise and train a dog which shows no serious aggression towards human’s except when defending it’s property.

The reason I have chosen the Canadian Kennel Club as a model for acting as a registry for dogs to be bred, is because they were created in 1887, over one hundred years ago for that exact purpose, to promote responsible breeding and ownership. This also eliminates the need to speed time and money to create a new registry. In additions animal rescues and humane societies should still be allowed to adopt out abandoned dogs, both of mixed and pure breed provided the dogs are of good temperment.

Other long-term outcomes include:

-Decrease in amount of abandoned pets, due to increased owner education at time of purchase/ adoption.

-Effectively end the plethora of puppy mills situated across Ontario, most whom rarely meet minimum care standards.

-Prevent a rabies outbreak by breeding vaccinated adult dogs and informing new owners as to the importance of vaccinations.

Thanks for your time,

Sincerely
Kayla Elizabeth Young, 18

"the reason I have chosen...." I am just proof reading this for you, you have this paragraph twice.

now my opinon: what you have stated sounds so right, if there are responsible breeders and people to educate new owners any breed can flourish and be acceptable to the general public. I used to be so afraid of Rotties until I met a female that had been trained and loved by their people/mom's/dad's. I remember when German Shepards used to be the "scary breed", and how sucky are they? lol IMOP treat them good train them good, no troubles pbp

Colubridz
February 23rd, 2008, 07:37 PM
Ok well thanks for the feed back.

I spent most of today tracking down contact info and revising my letters and here's what I've come up with.

To the Mayor Hazel McCallion:

Dear Mayor Hazel McCallion,

I am a resident of your city and I write to you today with a solution for the cities Pit Bull Problem. If you will indulge me, I am not a professional dog trainer, but I do work around a variety of animals all day long at a locally owned pet shop on Dundas Street East and Dixie Road. I own a dog and am actively involved with Dog Obedience.

As you are well aware the problem of Pit Bull’s is once again at the cities door step after a young Pit Bull named Rambo recently made headlines and have sparked debates after he was caught at large. I am completely opposed to Bill 132, Ontario’s Infamous Pit Bull Ban but this is not why I write you today, for there are many others to raise their voice over this. I write you today to offer a suggestion: Regulate the source of our domestic pals, and curb dog attack’s of all breed’s and mixes.

Years of research by Canadian and Global Applied Animal Behaviouralists have all conclusively proven time and time again that genetic disposition is a result of many factors none which are breed specific.

Taken from the Canadian Kennel Club’s website,

“The Canadian Kennel Club supports dangerous and/or vicious dog legislation, which would serve to protect the public from dangerous dogs. The Canadian Kennel Club does not support breed-specific legislation. The Canadian Kennel Club's opposition to breed-specific legislation is based on the fact that a dangerous temperament is a product of many factors, and not by breed alone. Thus, breed-specific legislation may include dogs which are not dangerous, while excluding those which are.

Eliminating sources such as pet stores, farms, flea markets, puppy mills along while outlawing the selling of unregistered Canadian Kennel Club Puppies in newspaper ads, online websites and other print and electronic sources will effectively solve the problem which the keeping of domestic dogs presents to public safety with a two fold approach.

One, it will effectively snuff out unregulated breeding of adult dogs who have not been properly temperament tested, drastically reducing the risk of aggressive dogs being purchased by discouraging undesirable traits from being passed from parent to offspring.

Two, it will increase the likelihood of successful placements of dogs in homes which are properly educated on how to raise and train a dog which shows no serious aggression towards human’s except when defending it’s property.

The reason I have chosen the Canadian Kennel Club as a model for acting as a registry for dogs to be bred, is because they were created in 1887, over one hundred years ago for that exact purpose, to promote responsible breeding and ownership. This also eliminates the need to speed time and money to create a new registry. In additions animal rescues and humane societies should still be allowed to adopt out abandoned dogs, both of mixed and pure breed provided the dogs are of good temperament.

Other long-term outcomes include:

-Decrease in amount of abandoned pets, due to increased owner education at time of purchase/ adoption.

-Effectively end the plethora of puppy mills situated across Ontario, most whom rarely meet minimum care standards.

-Prevent a rabies outbreak by breeding vaccinated adult dogs and informing new owners as to the importance of vaccinations.

Thanks for your time,

Sincerely
Kayla Elizabeth Young, age:18
Mississauga, Ontario

To Carolyn Parrish, a counciller of the city who has personally been qouted on the news to be against the Pit Bull Ban and has vowed to help fight Rambo's death sentence.

It is the same as above but with this added at the very end...


Lastly I would like to thank you for taking an objective look at Bill 132 and would urge you, as a voting citizen to help dog owners voices be heard.

To major news stations including, Global News, City News, CTV News and to the segment Focus Ontario the following...

Hello,

I am currently a resident of Ontario and write to you today to ask for media coverage on the upcoming Rambo and Munchie court cases. As you may or may not be aware both of these dogs are currently on death row, for looking like Pit bull’s.

The first case, Rambo a young dog caught running at large over the holidays has never shown a smidgen of aggression towards humans and yet because of Bill 132, Ontario’s infamous Pit Bull Ban, is now facing death. There was a time when this type of persecution existed in our world but I am shocked and disappointed to see it reappearing again so soon.

The second case, Munchie, a pure bred Labrador Retriever, was attacked by a man who broke into his owners house and tried to kill him, attacked the man and is now of death row for the same crime as Rambo, looking like a Pit Bull.

Under Ontario’s Current Dangerous Dog Act and Bill 132 this is perfectly legal, and the onus in both cases is on the owners to prove that their dogs are indeed not Pit Bull’s. For Rambo his owner was never informed that he could be sent out of province to another shelter where at least he would not be senselessly destroyed, the opportunity is now gone.

A similar case occurred two years ago around the time of the original enactment of Bill 132 involving a dog named Neville. Neville is now one of Washington State’s finest police dogs, sniffing out 300 cars a day for drugs and bombs and yes, he is a Pit Bull.

I urge you as a concerned dog owner and citizen of voting age in Ontario to please cover these two upcoming stories in an unbiased manner and please represent the thousands of concerned pet owners who are cringing at which breed will be banned next, because of a few bad owners.

Years of research by Canadian and Global Applied Animal Behaviouralists have all conclusively proven time and time again that genetic disposition is a result of many factors none which are breed specific.


A few story idea’s

-For Rambo's Case, mention the Neville story, highlighting how Pit Bull's can and do make a positive difference in communities world wide, from therapy dogs, service dogs and police dogs

For Munchie's story there are allegations of City Animal Services using breed standards from The CKC,AKC and UKC ( Canadian, American and United Kingdom Kennel Clubs) website to identify Munchie as a Pit Bull, when he is the spitting image of a Pure Bred Lab, a breed with similar traits to a Pit Bull.

Thanks for your time,

Sincerely,

Kayla Young, a concerned dog owner.










I give all who are intrested permisiion to cross post, as well as complete use of it to send identical or slighlty altered to your City officials and would like to remind everyone with two innocent dogs on death row it's a great time to get the public on a more sensible side.

I'll post all of my contact addresses below.

wdawson
February 23rd, 2008, 08:50 PM
the letter is good...but...i would eliminate the phrase....pitbull problem....

can you rephrase it as a breed specific problem?
the word pitbull scares some people......never mind an 80 something mayor:laughing:....you may trigger an election:laughing::laughing:

KimJ
February 23rd, 2008, 09:36 PM
I've begun a writing campaign to my city officials, and local news and print after two dogs in the last month have been put on death row for looking like PitBull's.

What I have suggested in my letter is simply something I think would have potential in providing a practical solution to BSL for both owners and city officials. If you don't agree with something I've suggested I'd love to discuss it but please keep pitbull ban debates out of this thread, there are plenty to battle it out in, I would like to keep this thread for suggestion and open discussion for those intrested in fighting BSL.

Thanks
Kayla


Dear Mayor Hazel McCallion,

I am a resident of your city and I write to you today with a solution for the city'sPit Bull Problem. If you will indulge me, I am not a professional dog trainer, but I do work around a variety of animals all day long at a locally owned pet shop on Dundas Street East and Dixie Road. I own a dog and am actively involved with Dog Obedience.

As you are well aware, the problem of Pit Bullremove apostrophes is once again at the city's door-step after a young Pit Bull named Rambo recently made headlines. Many debates were sparked after he was caught at large. I am completely opposed to Bill 132, Ontario’s Infamous Pit Bull Ban, but this is not why I write you today. Many others will raise their voices regarding this issue. I write you today to offer a suggestion: Regulate the source of our domestic pals, and curb dog attackremove apostrophes ten fold.

Years of research by Canadian and Global Applied Animal Behaviouralists have all conclusively proven time and time again that genetic disposition is a result of many factors, none which are breed specific.

Taken from the Canadian Kennel Club’s website:

“The Canadian Kennel Club supports dangerous and/or vicious dog legislation, which would serve to protect the public from dangerous dogs. The Canadian Kennel Club does not support breed-specific legislation. The Canadian Kennel Club's opposition to breed-specific legislation is based on the fact that a dangerous temperament is a product of many factors, and not by breed alone. Thus, breed-specific legislation may include dogs which are not dangerous, while excluding those which are."

Eliminating sources such as pet stores, farms, flea markets, and puppy mills, along with outlawing the selling of unregistered Canadian Kennel Club Puppies in newspaper ads, online websites, and other print and electronic sources will effectively solve the problem that the keeping of domestic dogs presents to public safety.

The reason I have chosen the Canadian Kennel Club as a model for acting as a registry for dogs to be bred, is because they were created in 1887, over one hundred years ago for the purpose of promotingresponsible breeding and ownership. This also eliminates the need to spendtime and money creating a new registry. In addition, animal rescues and humane societies should still be allowed to adopt out abandoned dogs, both of mixed and pure breed, provided the dogs are of good temperment.

One, it will effectively snuff out unregulated breeding of adult dogs who have not been properly temperament tested, drastically reducing the risk of aggressive dogs being purchased by discouraging undesirable traits from being passed from parent to offspring.

Two, it will increase the likelihood of successful placements of dogs with people who are properly educated on how to raise and train a dog that shows no serious aggression towards humanremove apostrophes except when defending itremove apostrophes property.

Remove duplicate paragraph

Other long-term outcomes include:

-Decrease in amount of abandoned pets, due to increased owner education at time of purchase/ adoption.

-Effectively end the plethora of puppy mills situated across Ontario, most whom rarely meet minimum care standards.

-Prevent a rabies outbreak by breeding vaccinated adult dogs and informing new owners as to the importance of vaccinations.

Thanks for your time,

Sincerely
Kayla Elizabeth Young, 18

I knew that English degree would come in handy someday ;P

Great topic though, well thought out, and I agree with your opinions!:thumbs up