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Advice for possible new dog owner

ShadPTR
February 14th, 2008, 04:35 PM
Hi all,
First, I'd like to thank everyone for spending the time to read this. This is my first post on this message board, and hopefully not the last! (so please be gentle) :)

I'm hoping I'm not out of line for posting this here, if so.. :sorry:

I've finally decided it may be time that I bring a dog into my life, I've been wanting to for awhile, but up until now, I've had various reasons where I did not, but I believe I'm finally ready!

I've tried to do a lot of reading and research and have decided that I'm in love with the golden retriever breed. As I understand, this breed is very needy and requires a lot of attention.

I'd like to ultimately see a reputable breeder, but understand that any reputable and responsible breeder will "grill" the possible new owner on various factors to make sure the puppy will be in a good home.

Which leads me to my question...

I am currently single, living in a house, because of my work schedule, I'm typically am away from the home from roughly 7am to 6:30pm, roughly a 12 hour span. On weekends, I typically stay home, only to go out on occasions (ok, boring I know. <chuckle>).

Will this new puppy be ok for that long of time? I've read a lot where its detrimental that they be left "alone all day". When I do get home, I certainly will see to my responsibilities as a dog owner that he/she gets the love that they deserve, but I'm very worried that it may not be healthy for the dog.

I will probably spend most of the weekend with the dog.

Any words of advice?

Sincerely.
ShadPTR

LavenderRott
February 14th, 2008, 05:02 PM
Honestly. No. A puppy really can't be left alone for twelve hours a day. That doesn't mean you are out of options, however. You can check around and see if you can find a reputable dog walker to take a puppy out a couple of times each day or you might consider rescueing or adopting an older dog.

If you decide to go with a puppy, I encourage you to make sure you go with either a reputable rescue group or an ETHICAL breeder. I say ethical instead of reputable because I know of several reputable breeders who are not what I consider ethical. An ethical breeder will be very careful to only breed dogs that are tempermentally sound and physically/genetically sound. This is very important. You really don't want to spend a ton of money (not to mention getting emotionally attached) to a dog that is crippled at a young age or drops dead while playing because the breeder took shortcuts to make money.

Yes, an ethical breeder is going to ask a ton of questions. They spend years with the breed, a ton of time and money making sure that their dogs are of the best "quality" (tempermentally and genetically), and take having a litter of puppies VERY seriously. They are pretty particular about where their pups go.

Another option you might want to consider is getting to know a breeder. I have a lovely Belgian Sheepdog in my home that was GIVEN to me by a breeder. He is genetically sound (his OFA's were done before I got him) and show quality but didn't like to show. He was given to me after he was altered because his breeder wanted him to have a good "pet" home.

luckypenny
February 14th, 2008, 06:23 PM
Great advice LavenderRott :thumbs up .

A puppy needs tons of socialization. To leave one at home at such a young age for such an extended time with no one coming in to exercise/play with him/her is asking for trouble imo. If you are to adopt an older dog, I'd still recommend hiring an experienced dogwalker, or a playgroup/daycare depending on the age.

I think it's great that you're really trying to think this through and do your research before making such a big decision :) .

I have a lovely Belgian Sheepdog in my home that was GIVEN to me by a breeder.

:sorry: :offtopic: Have we seen pics of this sweetie yet :confused: :D ?

ShadPTR
February 14th, 2008, 06:49 PM
Thank you kindly for your replies.