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Frenchy's Great Dane Advice - Please give me more!

danaekitty
February 14th, 2008, 12:00 PM
On the contrary , great danes are good in condos or apartment , because they are not hyper dogs and don't need loads of exercise. And funny enough , they don't take that much space (I'm fostering one) !

Frenchy - I was really interested in what you said in duttypaws' rant thread. I thought I'd start a new thread about this topic though, to avoid threadjacking.

My husband Mike (commonlaw) has been pressuring me to get a dog for some time now. I've always held him off with the excuse that our house is way too small - something that is true, but I'm actually using it as a cover. The truth is, I don't ever want a dog.

Go ahead and gasp.

I grew up with a German Shepherd, who I loved dearly, and I am truly an animal lover of all sorts and breeds, but the responsibility of having a dog is not something I want. At least until I have kids. Mike and I live alone with our two cats at the moment. I have always been a cat person (big time!) for a zillion reasons, and Mike was unsure about the cats at first but now loves them and couldn't live without.

Here are some issues I'm dealing with:

I don't really like puppies (another gasp, I know I'm a horrible person, sorry.) They will chew up my furniture, crap on my floor, not listen, etc. Not to mention that I don't ever want a crate in my house, but I work 9 hours a day and Mike sometimes works twelve, so it would be pretty difficult to give this puppy what it needs. I find them annoyingly needy.

I would have gladly solved this problem by becoming a foster or adopting a grown dog that is already trained, but Mike is pretty narrow minded when it comes to this, ie: doesn't want someone else's problems, doesn't want an abused animal, wants to raise his own dog from a baby, etc.

Moving into a new house plus getting a dog would ruin my cats' lives.

I have stockpiled all sorts of info about fostering and adoption for when we move into a larger house and can no longer dodge the bullet, including that kijiji ad for the dog for $10,000. I will present this info to him when the time comes, but it's unlikely he will relent on the New-Puppy-Only issue.

He keeps trying to bring home random puppies that have been born on farms, at his buddies' houses, etc. Once he tried to adopt a puppy from the Humane Society without telling me first. I was livid. Fortunately in that case, the HS said our yard was unfit, so we didn't get the dog. Another time his buddy's dog had a litter of pit-crosses, and he tried to bring one of those home. I gave him the info about pit-bulls in London, and he gave up on that.

Now that you have some background info, I'll get to the point. If he insists on getting a puppy, I'd like to at least get one that won't tear my house apart, will be extremely quick to train, gentle with the cats and will grow into a calm and obedient dog. I'm simply not one of those people who have lots of energy to give a hyperactive dog, and I really liked what Frenchy said about the Great Danes. Are there any other breeds that are appropriate for my situation? I should add here that small dogs are out of the question, as Mike would like something that could run with him.

I realize that maybe I'm stuck between a rock and a hard place. I've heard that the best way to break up a relationship is to get a dog. I love Mike though, and I'm willing to try this dog thing if I can find the right one.

Feel free to give advice, criticize my views or Mike's, or even my relationship! I'm really looking to discuss all angles of this issue.

Frenchy
February 14th, 2008, 12:21 PM
If he insists on getting a puppy, I'd like to at least get one that won't tear my house apart, will be extremely quick to train, gentle with the cats and will grow into a calm and obedient dog.

have you looked into adopting a fish ? :laughing:

I really really don't recommend that you guys adopt a dog. Everyone in your family (that means you and hubby) must be on the same page , and you're guys are defenetly not ! Your hubby shouldn't pressure you if you don't want to get a dog. And it's ok ! I rather people that know they don't want one , then people who will not think things through , get a dog , and dump him after a couple weeks / months.

Some adult dogs are as much work as puppies , and not because what your hubby thinks (rescue dogs are problems , abuse etc...) the problem with these dogs were the owners who abandoned them. :sad: Most dogs in rescues are wonderful dogs ! I know because I foster for a golden rescue.

If your husband miss having a dog , may I suggest to him to volunteer his time to a humane society , they are always looking for dog walkers ....

want4rain
February 14th, 2008, 12:31 PM
*laughs* gosh, you sound just like OUR situation!! guess who is at home with the dog??? ME!! i lucked out though, we have a mostly lab mix (ie not enough mixed in to tell what, if anything) who is obedient, lazy and doesnt like the taste of bitter apple.

i think there's lots of things you can do to minimize the impact of a pooch in the house, health problems later, etc.

kenneling goes a long way. not only is it healthier for your furniture but its healthier for your dog to have a sort of retreat to go to. the ONLY time Mister has gotten upset and whined at Jeffrey was the one time he got in his kennel. he gave me this pitiful look like 'come on mom! its MY only place.... help me!!'

obedience training is the most important thing you can give your dog besides a roof and food and love. sure ANYONE can blunder their way through it (we did!!!) but by the time you learn how to talk to your dog, you gotta undo all the bad words you already taught him, if you understand my meaning.

with bigger dogs, its very very easy to feed a raw meat/bones/offal diet which really helps the chewing thing with pups AND cause they are big(ger) you shouldnt have to cut much up to portion out daily pieces. hey, you know what i just thought of? cause they get so much water through their diet, they DRINK less.... which means less drool all over the house.

anyways, a dane is a great idea. they are amazingly smart dogs. i think the bigger dogs are far more aware of their surroundings and their effect on it. as an adult, Mister has jumped on me ONCE. it knocked me into a wall, the couch and a table. he felt HORRIBLE even before i could get up, get my 'mad mom' face on and shake my finger at him.

well, good luck with it. i wasnt really crazy abotu a dog (this big) when my hubby (who went out for FORMULA and then) brought Mister home but you know what? he is the coolest thing, you know? i just *love* being worshiped!! adored!!! and trying to do my best to adore him back. :lovestruck:

-ash

danaekitty
February 14th, 2008, 12:39 PM
Frenchy -
We've talked it to death, and he says we're getting a dog, and that's just the way it is. I said the same to him when we first moved in together and it was cat-time.
I would rather get a dog than end a marriage. I'm not unreasonable - I know I can adapt to having a dog, possible even love one, and I would NEVER abandon any animal that I'd committed myself to. Mike would also love this dog more than anything, he's been restricted from having one for one reason or another for about ten years, and he should be able to have one if the conditions are right and he is able to provide the care, I don't want to begrudge him that.

I'd like to point out here that I would be an excellent dog owner. I would never treat a dog poorly because of what she cannot help, and I am willing to do whatever it takes to train it and meet its needs, even if I'm a little trepidatious at first, like I'm sure many first-time-since-childhood dog owners are.
I know there's a breed out there for me, that won't make me feel uncomfortable in my house and will listen to me and not just my husband (which is one of my biggest fears). I'm not afraid of large dogs, I really need some direction from dog-people who have experience with lots of breeds.

Btw, I have an aquarium, ha ha. I agree that it is much more "me", but I'm in a partnership and it's time for me to compromise. I'll agree to get a puppy if only I can find the right kind.

Ash - Thanks for commiserating! I liked your comment about the love and worship, I never thought of that. I was also interested in the raw/bone diet. I will definitely research that when the time comes. Interesting about the drooling too, because I was looking at Blood or Bassett hounds. Anyone know anything about those?

So you think a crate is necessary?

Frenchy
February 14th, 2008, 12:45 PM
Ok then , I just wanted to make sure this wouldn't end in a divorce :laughing: and yet another dog left at the shelter.

What you could do is make a list of the breeds you like and then google them. Read on the breed , they always explain what type of dog they are , how much exercise they need , how much grooming they need , what are their health concerns ....

Also , you still can get a young dog at the shelter or from a rescue. With a rescue , the dog will most likely be in foster care so they can tell you how he is. Also , they will make the match , they won't let you adopt if you want a dog that is not right for your family.

If you need ANY help , feel free to ask ! :thumbs up

danaekitty
February 14th, 2008, 12:56 PM
Ok then , I just wanted to make sure this wouldn't end in a divorce :laughing: and yet another dog left at the shelter.


If you need ANY help , feel free to ask ! :thumbs up

Ha ha, I doubt it would get that far. And if it did, Mike would just take the dog start letting it sleep in bed with him (a HUGE no-no, as far as I'm concerned) just to spite me!

Frenchy, I remember reading on this board something about how it's bad to just get dogs from random places like a friend's litter, but I can't find the thread. Can you give me any guidance on this, maybe some advice I can give Mike so he doesn't start looking in backyard litters?

Frenchy
February 14th, 2008, 01:05 PM
Frenchy, I remember reading on this board something about how it's bad to just get dogs from random places like a friend's litter, but I can't find the thread.

It's probably from a sticky , check out the upper threads in each forums ... I have to go back to work but will come back later.

Gibbons
February 14th, 2008, 01:10 PM
Har har- this sounds almost like our situation. I am insistent on getting a dog eventually (hopefully soon-ish!) and hubby reluctantly agreed on the condition that we get a puppy.

I'm not too big on the puppy idea for the same reasons (housetraining, etc) and feel guilty about getting suckered into getting a puppy when there are so many adult dogs who end up abandoned and alone for no reason of their own. We were originally looking at just "dogs for sale" classifieds, until I realized what a horrid idea that was.

I have discovered, though, that hubby can't tell the difference between an 8 wk old and a 16-wk old pup, having never been around puppies before. At least at 16 weeks, if the dog has been fostered, they're making progress with housetraining and general house rules (like don't eat my shoes, eat your chew toy). I also feel slightly less guilty because they are older. I don't know how my head works, but it seems to make sense in some way :shrug:

So maybe you can do the puppy thing with outgoing for the all-the-way puppy. I mean- dogs are often considered pups until they're about a year old! Just be as sneaky as HE has tried being, and bring home an older dog that he'll fall in love with (don't actually, that's horrible advice!). You could also look into fostering to show him that even older dogs don't necessarily have that many problems.

danaekitty
February 14th, 2008, 01:20 PM
Ha ha, Gibbons, you make me laugh with your bad ideas!!!
Although I have to admit that randomly bringing home an adult dog crossed my mind as well. In an ideal world, I could have an adult dog that immediately feels comfy in our home, doesn't need a crate, make a mess, abuse the cats, and Mike will just love it.
But thanks for the advice about getting a slighly older puppy. This actually gives me an idea - I think he may agree to me choosing the dog initially, and then he gets final approval. That way I can still get a rescue instead of a backyard puppy, I can choose one that's already partially trained, and I can choose the breed. (I'm really leaning toward Great Danes!)
Thanks, Gibbons!

CearaQC
February 14th, 2008, 01:25 PM
I wanted a dog and told hubby I wanted one. He said no we're not getting a dog.

So I said OK how about a rescue that we just keep for a little while? He said well maybe.

Then I went ahead and got Belle and now he loves her, always petting her telling her she's a good girl and invites both dogs to snuggle up with him if he takes a nap in the afternoon.

I know he's all talk and is a big softy... everything worked out fine. :laughing:

breeze
February 14th, 2008, 01:28 PM
When we got our first dog I knew nothing about them. Breed, temperment, food, the works, I also had small kids at the time..
The first dog I ever owner was 6 months old collie/germond shepard. the second was 6 weeks old Huskey the thrid was 1 1/2 years old rottie/dobie, and now we have Bree Bernese

What I have learnt training and excersise is the key, make sure you are the alpha dog and the one in charge..and both you and hubby must be on the same page for this to work.

I also belive in create training, I would not have it any other way..
Start a list of what you would like in a dog, behavior, temperment, size, and then write down what you don't want in a dog, hyper, how much excerise you want or can give the pooch..

Research the breeds and read up on all the qualities you would like. talk to breeders ( they don't charge for phone calls) go see them, see what they are like and how the doggies behave..

Getting a pup is alot of work but it is worth while..
Not all dogs chew the furniture, crap on my floor, not listen, that is where training comes into play..

you must be strong for disapline, and you have to expect some problems other wise they would not be doggies..

:dog: does this help at all?? I hope so..

danaekitty
February 14th, 2008, 01:56 PM
Thanks, Breeze. I will make that list and get Mike to make one too. It will be a little while still before we start realistically looking for a dog, so that will give us the time we need to discuss things rationally and come to a solution.

Still hoping for breed tips to research!

breeze
February 14th, 2008, 01:59 PM
Still hoping for breed tips to research!

what kind of breed tips are you looking for??

can you be more spesific??(sp?)

Purpledomino
February 14th, 2008, 02:56 PM
Danaekitty, Danes are wonderful dogs, I have one, but I would caution you if you think they will be content with little exercise. They can be relatively inactive in the house, but are big athletic dogs which do require consistant and adequate exercise for their well being physically and mentally.

I am always amazed at how athletic my Abby is, and in her seventh year with me, is considered an aged Dane....also something you want to consider in this short lived breed. Drool happens, gas happens....and although an older Dane will usually be very good indoors...a gregarious and clumsy juvenile will knock everything over as a puppy. (also watch the tail as it is at the perfect level to clear your table!) The tall stature of a Dane will make keeping food out of reach a challenge, and other things, so training is ongoing.

If you are adamant about adopting a Dane, my advice like everyone elses is to do your homework, it can work out wonderfully if you are prepared. :dog:

breeze
February 14th, 2008, 03:02 PM
I think ALL tail on big and meduim dogs can be a problem.. (great way to get out of dusting the coffee table) just some are softer than others :laughing:

Ford Girl
February 14th, 2008, 03:44 PM
One thing...puppies are ALOT of work, and I mean alot - the first few months is so much work...you go thru a whole aray of emotions...you always expect it to be tough, but I found it to be ALOT of work...I laughed, I cried, I said.."what were we thinking".."can we return her" "puppy for sale - $4000 - defective" (joking of course) We are a young couple too, with only a cat at the time, small house and yard...I have even said I will never get another puppy!! (I now take that back... :D still waiting for my new puppy to land on my front door :lovestruck: ) I just wanted to throw that out there, a puppy will rock your quiet cat world.

And just when they are house trained and getting better at listening, they go thru adolecence! :eek: :laughing: :eek:

Dazy was exceptionally hard, maybe not all puppies are like that, but mine was a little :evil:.

If you do get a pup from a rescue or shelter, they can match you up with a personality that will suit your life style...just be honest of your expectations and know that nothing is ever guarenteed with a breed.

The training never ends, and for me - personally, a crate or x-pen is absolutly required. (again, I have 75lbs of pure no holds barred golden love to deal with :evil: :laughing:)

I would also suggest your DH volunteers at a shelter, all kinds of dogs need some love'n. He gets his fix, you get your peace. :thumbs up

danaekitty
February 14th, 2008, 03:52 PM
Breeze - I'm looking for gentle, smart breeds. Easy to train, able to run with Mike, yet content to sit and watch tv with me, sometimes for hours. Large ones preferably. I loved my shepherd, but she shed a LOT. A breed that is good with moody cats. Most importantly, a dog that will LISTEN. A friend of mine has a beagle that never listens...well, she listens and then blatantly ignores. Also, a dog that will hold her poo until I get home from work, ha ha.

purpledomino - Thanks for the Dane advice. I think at this point I'm really leaning toward one. I'll have to keep my ear to the ground for Dane rescues.

danaekitty
February 14th, 2008, 03:56 PM
One thing...puppies are ALOT of work, and I mean alot - the first few months is so much work...you go thru a whole aray of emotions...you always expect it to be tough, but I found it to be ALOT of work...I laughed, I cried, I said.."what were we thinking".."can we return her" "puppy for sale - $4000 - defective" (joking of course) We are a young couple too, with only a cat at the time, small house and yard...I have even said I will never get another puppy!!

That's exactly what I'm worried about. I'm a very sensitive and emotional person, and I'm worried that I might not be able to take the stress. I guess having Mike there will ease it a little - it's not like I'll be raising it alone.


Are there any advantages to having a girl dog over a boy dog, or vice versa?

breeze
February 14th, 2008, 03:58 PM
danekitty..

I know of a dog that listens, does not shed a lot, hold her or his poop for long periods of time, sits anywhere you want it to,
want to know what kind it is??










it




is





a








stuffy hahahahahahaha...:laughing::D


sorry I was being a smart :censored:


training has a lot to do with it, really,
there has to be time for adjustments
it took me a year to get Bree to sleep in until 9;00am and to lie quitly when I work.. it takes training to get the dog to do what you want..

breeze
February 14th, 2008, 04:00 PM
That's exactly what I'm worried about. I'm a very sensitive and emotional person, and I'm worried that I might not be able to take the stress. I guess having Mike there will ease it a little - it's not like I'll be raising it alone.


Are there any advantages to having a girl dog over a boy dog, or vice versa?

I always thought so until I got coby the rotti mix, great dog.. the other 2 and now Bree were/are females..

we are planning on getting a male....

so I would say no...IMO

Kristin7
February 15th, 2008, 07:37 AM
If you spend a lot of time looking, even in shelters, you should be able to find a dog or puppy that fits what you want. I am very picky about my dogs too, and must be doing something right when I go looking, as I've ended up with two awesome dogs from shelters. I adopted them both when they were older puppies, 4-6 months old. The dog I have now actually sounds a lot like what you are looking for except that he's only about 50 lbs. I found him at a local shelter, he is a Border Collie/Akita/Sharpei mix (I know this because I had him genetically tested). I always thought he acted like a big dog in a smaller dogs body...must be the Akita part of him that is the big dog. He is mellow in the house, rarely barks, doesn't shed much, is fairly obedient and listens well. He also has plenty of energy outside for running with me or going for long hikes, and loves playing in the snow and swimming. He is good with my cats and other dogs. If you are worried about tails knocking things over, consider a dog with a curled up tail. Mine loves wagging his tail (and his whole body along with it) but has never knocked anything over because it curls up over his back. Puppies are a lot of work, but if you can make it through the first few months, it does get easier (usually). Good luck, sounds like there is a dog in your future whether you want one or not! :fingerscr Dane puppies are sooo cute!! :lovestruck:

danaekitty
February 15th, 2008, 08:08 AM
Well that sounds good, Kristin, why don't I just take yours? Ha ha, kidding, obviously.
So the tail thing seems to be a popular complaint. That's something I would have never thought of.
Everyone is really helping me feel better about my doggie fate ... it's good to know that I have so much support when things get a little hairy - and by the sounds of it, they will!

breeze
February 15th, 2008, 09:13 AM
danaekitty you said that your shepherd sheds alot..

IMO I find short haired and kinda meduim haired dogs shed. Longer haired dogs shed but in clumps, easier to pick up or vacumm up..

if you spend a small amount of time brushing every day it will stay under controll.. I find with Bree if I brush her 15 mintues a day then the hair is not so bad, and is easly controled..

(mike runs with Bree in the summer and roller blads with her) but I was told when we got her that we should not run or blad with her until she was 6-8 months old cause she was still developing her bones and mussle struture.. I belive it is the same with a Dane..


o and they all get the zommies at some time or another

you are worried about stress?? there is no stress with a doggie :D

Kristin7
February 15th, 2008, 09:21 AM
Well that sounds good, Kristin, why don't I just take yours? :eek: Nice try but no! :D I'm actually thinking of getting another dog, and have been looking around... it is hard, I want another one just as cool as Guinness, but am afraid I never will because he is just so awesome! And what if I get one that isn't quite as good and it teaches him bad habits... because that is what would happen, I'm sure, it wouldn't be the other way around (him teaching the new dog good habits). :laughing:

danaekitty
February 15th, 2008, 09:48 AM
o and they all get the zommies at some time or another


I saw that tiny writing, Breeze! What are zommies?

breeze
February 15th, 2008, 09:55 AM
I saw that tiny writing, Breeze! What are zommies?


hahaha

it when all your furniture is pushed to the walls by your doggie and your doggie runs around the house like the devil himself took over your doggie and you can't stop it.....hahahaha

(really it is all of a sudden you doggie has this extrodinary amount of energy, and he/she runs around the house and the only thing you can do is curl up your legs and get out of their way) but no stress hahahaha

danaekitty
February 15th, 2008, 10:12 AM
HAHAHA you must mean the ZOOMIES, when he's zooming around! I'm very familiar with that, with the cats...I can only imagine the destruction and chaos that will be caused...:eek:

breeze
February 15th, 2008, 10:18 AM
HAHAHA you must mean the ZOOMIES, when he's zooming around! I'm very familiar with that, with the cats...I can only imagine the destruction and chaos that will be caused...:eek:

ok now you know my secret I DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL :laughing::D
no destruction cause you know it's going to happen so you prepare for it..

step 1 move all furniture against wall

step 2 make sure that where ever the doggie run there is a clear path

step 3 do not get in the doggies way

step 4 make sure YOU have an ecape route

step 5 make sure you are no where nere the doggie when this happens

step 6 make sure you have a camera in your pocket at all times

step 7 then when you had enough learn the command "enough"

:D:D:D:D :laughing::laughing::laughing: :thumbs up

Chris21711
February 15th, 2008, 10:22 AM
danaekitty - you said you was looking at Bassett Hounds, don't even go there unless you want a challenge. We have two (our 4th and 5th since in Canada), they are hard to house train, stubborn, learn, but only listen when they feel like it. Rebel, I don't think has learned anything in three years, only to take his ice cube onto the rug (so it doesn't pool on wood floor). Whenever you tell him anything, he looks at you completely confused, but we are Bassett Lovers through and through. As for Bloodhounds they have the best sniffers so expect it to wander.

Except for being large, our two gentlest dogs over the years have been. Maxi a Bernese X and Pepsi a Pyr. I love mountain dogs tooooo.

breeze
February 15th, 2008, 10:29 AM
Except for being large, our two gentlest dogs over the years have been. Maxi a Bernese X and Pepsi a Pyr. I love mountain dogs tooooo.

Chris did you know that there are two different types of berness, well that is what
I was told american with more energy and the swiss..
guess Bree is the american:shrug: we are also looking into a leonberger as the next doggie.. very very gentle doggies

danaekitty
February 15th, 2008, 10:36 AM
Wow, Chris, thanks for that tip, becuase a Bassett has been my plan for years, and I don't think I'm ready at this point for the challenge you say Bassetts can be.

Kristin7
February 15th, 2008, 10:45 AM
Yeah, I have had some friends with Bassets, and have heard some stories! They are cute and sweet though. My neighbors have 8 of them, as you can imagine, when they get to howling it is quite a ruckus! Bernese mtg dogs... they are so beautiful and most of the ones I've met are pretty mellow (but not all, maybe it was the difference breeze mentioned), they are nice and big too. One of my friends had an Anatolian Shepherd/Pyr x, he was quite mellow, big and sweet, but also a handful. He was always getting out of their yard, and did have some dog aggressiveness, with certain other big male dogs. I love the big flock guardian types...

14+kitties
February 15th, 2008, 10:50 AM
Now don't laugh - but I have found that the easiest dog to train has been my toy poodle. I crate trained her and she never once used it for a toilet. In fact, she never went inside. Of course I was taking her and her "sister" outside every couple of hours at first. Very intelligent dogs, poodles. I know you said you wanted a bigger dog and poodles come in different sizes. They are also good for hiking. Originally they were bred for hunting and retrieving - hence the webbed feet for retrieving from water. Poodles also do not shed. They are quite happy to sit quietly for hours and are very easily trained.

I also would consider mixed breeds. We had one we had to pts last year who was a collie/shepard mix. Very very gentle and obediant. She loved attention. We also currently have a big suck of a Labx who is oh so good. She loves to go on walks with her kids but is also content to just sit and watch the world go by.

Just to give you more to think about. :D

Kristin7
February 15th, 2008, 10:52 AM
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/a-z.htm a decent website for researching breeds

It mentions Berners lifespans average 7-8 years, reduced in recent years due to increasing cancer rate? yikes! do you know anything about that breeze? are some lines better than others healthwise?

breeze
February 15th, 2008, 10:59 AM
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/a-z.htm a decent website for researching breeds

It mentions Berners lifespans average 7-8 years, reduced in recent years due to increasing cancer rate? yikes! do you know anything about that breeze? are some lines better than others healthwise?

the swiss ones have a tendicy to live short life cause of their size (much wider,shorter to the ground and not as active) and heavier than the american one which are more leaner and taller.... IMO it is also the luck of the draw sort a speak.. the larger dogs no matter what breed they are have shorter life spans..
Bree is only 70lbs, and very active outside, calm in the house.(until mike and the boys come home).very loyal, and is very happy cuddling on the couch when I'm alone..

Chris21711
February 15th, 2008, 11:14 AM
Chris did you know that there are two different types of berness, well that is what
I was told american with more energy and the swiss..
guess Bree is the american:shrug: we are also looking into a leonberger as the next doggie.. very very gentle doggies

I didn't know there was any other besides the Swiss. Max was such a good boy, that even when it was his time to go, my Hubby took him to the Vet and called me to say that it was his recommendation to put him to sleep I was beside myself and said that I would be right over to talk to him before making a decision. While I was getting changed Hubby called back to say that Maxie had already made the decision for me and passed on. :sad:

danaekitty - don't be deterred by my comments if you really would like one, we would not be without one, now being on our fifth one kind of proves that, but some people are fooled by their dopey oh so cute looks. They are not dopey at all, with the exception of Rebel. Terriers too can be stubborn, we have a Terrier X, I love Terriers tooooo. Would love to have a Jack.

Kristin7 - I don't think I could handle 8 of them, meal times, my two have to eat in the back room as they have no manners and do not respect the rule
of 'don't stick your nose in my little dish'. Although when Pepsi (Pyr) was around, nobody fooled with her dish.:D
What I really love is when they start baying, then Iggy (Husky X) chimes in with his Huskie notes, good thing we only have one neighbour. If we lived in a populated area, for sure everyone and their mother would be complaining.

breeze
February 15th, 2008, 11:26 AM
danaekitty

once you and hubby make the list of wants and don't wants, big or small temperment and personnality, and research,
you WILL find the right one for you, it is a personnal choise of what kind of dog you are looking for and for what reason..and regardless of the life span of the doggie, for the time the doggie will be with you it is all worth while....

you will be a great person to own a doggie (if that is what you/hubby want)..
just don't feel presured into making a choise if you are not ready..


there are so many breedes, mixed breeds, it can make your head spin :eek:

:grouphug::grouphug::fingerscr

I love BIG doggies, in my eyes the bigger the better.. hahaha


:grouphug::grouphug:

Frenchy
February 15th, 2008, 12:12 PM
Now don't laugh - but I have found that the easiest dog to train has been my toy poodle.


Poodles are very intelligent dogs.

As for the zoomies ..... it's quite a show to see a great dane doing this , inside the house :laughing: but she NEVER knocked anything down and can stop on her tracks (I think she has ABS brakes :D) if one of the kitties are in her way (but they usually move from her path) also , she has never knocked anything with her tail BUT I never leave anything on the coffee table.


Now with the fur ..... I like my goldens fur because it's like hair and easier to pick up. As for short coated dogs with "straight" hair , it does get into fabric and is a lot harder to vacuum. I usually use tape. :shrug:

krdahmer
February 15th, 2008, 01:00 PM
Wow... I am so glad I'm not the only one that feels this way about a dog!! My hubby wants one desperately and not a small dog either (had a GSD growing up)... for now I have the 'we have no room excuse', but really I prefer to admire other people's dogs (especially on here ;) ). I just don't think with 6 cats and all my other duties that I could also take on a dog. And hubby wants to take a dog in the truck with him which many truckers do, but that just seems so dangerous to me, both for the dog and for him. I love all animals, but would rather wait until we have space outside of the city, and when our finances are not so strained.

And I love that no one took offense to any of what you said! You gotta love this board!!! :thumbs up

Best of luck with your hubby!

Frenchy
February 15th, 2008, 01:06 PM
And I love that no one took offense to any of what you said! You gotta love this board!!! :thumbs up



I like people who know what they want/what they don't want. Thinking about adopting a pet is serious business and when I see people thinking and taking their time and asking questions .... :thumbs up

A friend of mine just loves my dogs , he started to think about adopting one himself. But then he saw how consume I am with mine .... allergies , many vet visits and so on and he decided it wasn't for him. I was glad he didn't just adopt and THEN change his mind. :o

Gibbons
February 15th, 2008, 01:19 PM
We've already mostly picked out what we want our first dog to be- a med to large sized mixed breed with medium-length fur! Ha! After researching every available breed, I think I'm comfortable enough to get a mix of a few different breeds I like.

For our next dog, I'm looking at bigger ones- rottie (if I can convince hubby it won't eat him), pyr, dane, or the burmese mt dog. I like how I start planning my second dog before we even have a first! Great fun.

I also wanted to share my story about an apparently under-trained burmese. I was in Petsmart picking up food bowls for our two fosters, and this lady came in with her burmese on a leash. It's all tile in there, obviously, and the dog is running hard but not going very fast... partially because he was slipping on the tiles, but also because he was towing behind him his frazzled owner (she was leaning back and digging her heels in) and her 4-yr old son, who was sliding across the floor holding on to Mom's hand, looking like this was an every day thing. I almost fell over laughing, but they were too far away for me to distract the dog so they could (hopefully) get a handle on things again.

Big Dog + Loose leash walking skills = VERY important!

danaekitty
February 15th, 2008, 02:28 PM
krdahmer - nice to have a few kindred spirits, eh? I thought I was a horrible person, and I KNOW Mike thinks so. It's an uphill battle for sure...I'm sure the end result will be worth it.

mastifflover
February 15th, 2008, 02:42 PM
Danes are great dogs but not a dog that is going to go running with your BF. I own an English Mastiff and live in a small loft big dogs are great in small spaces. Mind you I am not a small dog person, Bud only requires enough floor space to sprawl out. Also not a breed that will go running. Giant breeds do have problems in the heat so keep that in mind. Unless maybe you consider a standard poodle very smart love to run. Luckly Bud saves his zoomies for outside and I just stay out of the way one broken wrist was enough for me. Also if you are considering kids then think very long and hard because more dogs get dumped because people are having kids, this is especially common for giant breeds because they will knock your kids over and step on there feet or just lean against them. So if this is going to be a problem then do not get a dog. My personal opinion if you can not handle a dog and a kid then save the dog the heartache of being dumped when the kid comes along. This is one of the lamest excuses for dumping your dog, of course justified by saying we won't have enough time for the dog and want it to have a better life that is a pile of BS. If you get a pup they are going to get into mischief it is inevitable that is what puppies do. Just research the breed you want or in your case don't want. I would suggest not getting a dog since you both do not want one and in my opinion that is not a fair situation for you or the dog. One more thing giant breeds come with giant vet bills. An example Buds ear medication costs 145.00 for an medium sized dog the same meds are 90.00. They require ususally twice the doseage. Hip surgery approx. 3000.00 per hip. Just something else to consider

Ford Girl
February 15th, 2008, 03:01 PM
I didn't mean to scare you with my puppy rant...but I wanted to share what we went thru, we found it to be very difficult to adjust our lives for the first few months...before we got our golden we were oblivious to the amount of work, vet and medical expenses, poor breed lines from bybers, agression in any breed...

That's what happens when cat people get a high enery big dog! LOL! :eek: :laughing:


Well that sounds good, Kristin, why don't I just take yours? Ha ha, kidding, obviously.
So the tail thing seems to be a popular complaint. That's something I would have never thought of.
Everyone is really helping me feel better about my doggie fate ... it's good to know that I have so much support when things get a little hairy - and by the sounds of it, they will!

Yes, the tail issue...my golden's tail clear tables in one swipe, it's fine at our place, cuz we keep it tidy, but when we go visit...it's a nightmare...unless they know her. Other dog owners know...non-dog owners don't. hah!!


Chris did you know that there are two different types of berness, well that is what
I was told american with more energy and the swiss..
guess Bree is the american:shrug: we are also looking into a leonberger as the next doggie.. very very gentle doggies

Same with goldens, american and english breeding lines....

Does this apply to alot of breeds? I saw a show on Dobies, and there are 2 lines with them too. One more protective and one more social.

For berners...is there a swiss berner...or are you thinking the Swiss Mountian Dog? Berenses Mnt. Dogs and Swiss Mnt. Dogs are different.

Next to a golden, a berner is my second choice...then a lab.

Now don't laugh - but I have found that the easiest dog to train has been my toy poodle.


I was going to say poodle too! They are very athletic, non shedding, smart, loyal, playful and good with kids. Both standard and mini. BUT - high energy. Your DH wants to run with him...thats understandable, does he run every day? Cuz the dog will need exercise every day, a run with your DH or not. (I spend 1 - 3 hours a day exercising my dog!! I can only get away with no exercise for one night max!)


I watch the show Breed - All About It on Animal Planet, love that show...they really dig in to the history, pros and cons, and are very forth coming with medical issues and breed traits that have changed overe the years due to over breeding.

want4rain
February 15th, 2008, 03:04 PM
well i can tell you that my 2yo takes a furry butt to the face on occasion and is none the worse for wear..... i think Mister calls it revenge. he tells me often he is NOT a horse!! but it works well for them. Mister just isnt the same dog when its Jeffreys nap time. they do terrible things to your babies like run around with their noses in their butts, tongues in their necks, i found Mister tugging on Jeffreys pants the other day. Jeffrey finds him to be the softest bestest pillow, seat, blanket.... he is the best thing to hide his toys under, share his food with. he is quite interested in his teeth, tongue... what those two things do to windows, toys.... poor poor Mister.... Jeffrey thought it was really great to poke Mister in the butt with his little Black and Decker wrench. it was the ON button for Mister, gave him the ZOOMIES.

all in all, i think the larger breeds are better with kids because they can handle kids loving much better. if Jeffrey wacks Misters butt with said wrench, Mister doesnt even feel it. a smaller dog would be plowed by a kid. a larger breed, since the wacking doesnt HURT, it gives you the chance to reprimand your kid without fostering aggression in your dog. 'petting' a larger dog is actual petting, they can sit on them with out harming them. Mister is MOSTLY careful of where his body is. sometimes he turns around too fast not knowing Jeffrey is there. Jeffrey is learning to be polite to animals. :o

-ashley

breeze
February 15th, 2008, 03:09 PM
Danes are great dogs but not a dog that is going to go running with your BF.

I have to disagree with that one.. I have a friend of mine that has a dane two to be exact, she goes running with them every day.....

Ford Girl
February 15th, 2008, 03:13 PM
I have to disagree with that one.. I have a friend of mine that has a dane two to be exact, she goes running with them every day.....

I have hear/seen that danes can turn it on and off...energetic when you want them to be...and good in small homes too..

I heard that about grey hounds and whippets too...they need to run run run, but in the home they are pretty laid back. Portuguise water dogs too. :D

I guess thats something to consider too, some dogs need a job or something to do to play to their natural talents and abilities...but all dogs need leadership, so both you and DH will need to be onthe same page for all aspects.

All this talk makes me want another puppy!!! See...even tho it was a living nightmare :laughing: for us at first, I'd still get another one...just waiting for it to rain puppies...:cloud9:

Chris21711
February 15th, 2008, 03:17 PM
Ford Girl - the Bernese Mountain dog is one of the four breeds of dogs from the Swiss Mountain range. Bern is the Swiss capital, I guess that is where the name originated from.

Ford Girl
February 15th, 2008, 03:43 PM
Ford Girl - the Bernese Mountain dog is one of the four breeds of dogs from the Swiss Mountain range. Bern is the Swiss capital, I guess that is where the name originated from.

Oh! Ok. Interesting. What are the other 2? :) St. Bernards and Paraynese? Just a random guess...

The Greater swiss mnt. looks way different the the berner, same coloring tho.

Chris21711
February 15th, 2008, 03:51 PM
St. Bernards are one of the other breeds, can't think of the fourth right now.
Pyr's are from the Pyrenee Mountains between Spain and France (small country up there called Andorra - tax free:D). Did you know the Pyr's have double dew claws? I didn't until we got one, thought it was a birth defect until I was clued in.

danaekitty
February 15th, 2008, 04:01 PM
The thing about Mike and his "running" is that he doesn't actually DO it unless I force him to go to the gym with me. :laughing: I think he's just using the running excuse so that he gets final say over the breed.

From what I've read about Danes over the last couple days, the dog should be okay whether he goes for a quick run two days a week and a nice long walk the other four, right? It seems from what you've all written that this is a very versatile dog that will happily take whatever we give him, so long as he's getting enough of whatever that may be.

I've also been researching Dane breeders in the area (things are VERY slow at my job this week) and have decided that if I were to have a choice (still haven't decided between breeder and rescue), I LOOOOOVE the look of a Blue Dane. They are breathtakingly beautiful. Does anyone know of any differences between a Blue and, say, a Fawn/Mantle/etc? Differences in personality, temperament, price, etc.

Gibbons
February 15th, 2008, 05:02 PM
I found this website recently, and I stumbled across two rescues that are primarily dane rescues. I don't know which ones they were, or even what areas they are in, or how reputable they are (I don't know anything, apparently :rolleyes: ) but they are in there!

Just thought I'd pass it along, I've been having fun browsing some of the rescues.

http://www.canadasguidetodogs.com/onrescue.htm

Frenchy
February 15th, 2008, 07:21 PM
From what I've read about Danes over the last couple days, the dog should be okay whether he goes for a quick run two days a week and a nice long walk the other four, right?

I agree with mastifflover , a great dane would not be a good jogging partner. Unless it's no more than 15 minutes run , in my opinion. They have small hearts for their size so they can't take too much ... Nelly does run like crazy outside and she fetches her ball , but never for too long , about 15 minutes , they get out of breath faster than most breeds .... BUT walks are ok !

Frenchy
February 15th, 2008, 07:29 PM
Don't get me wrong , they do need the exercise , but great danes just aren't border collies :p

goldengal
February 15th, 2008, 07:50 PM
The four Swiss Mountain Dogs are the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog (110-155 lbs), the Bernese Mountain Dog (65-120 lbs), the Appenzeller Sennehund (49-70 lbs) and the Entlebucher Mountain Dog (45-65 lbs.) They all have the same tri colouring.

In our house we have a Golden (3-1/2), a Bernese Mountain Dog (turned 4 this week) and a Leonberger (2-1/2). The Berner is the most laid back dog; in fact we always said he was an old soul as a puppy. The Golden is mine (have had Goldens for 24 years), but if I was ever getting another dog, it would be a Berner. The Leonberger is the most delightful of them all, but she was hell on wheels as a puppy - chewed up 4 expensive pairs of my daughter's boots, drywall and wood trim. My son in law became very adept at repairing drywall. Now at 2-1/2 she is finally calming down.

I still love Goldens, but now love the other two breeds just as much.

They have all been crate trained, and we always kept the crate in our respective bedrooms. As you can see, they are pretty close in age so it seemed we always had a puppy around for quite a while so there were lots of holes dug in the yard - mostly from my Golden. They are all well behaved and get along well together. and it is fun to watch them play together outside. In fact when they go to an off leash park, they tend to just play together rather than mingling.

wdawson
February 15th, 2008, 10:25 PM
ok now you know my secret I DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL :laughing::D
no destruction cause you know it's going to happen so you prepare for it..

step 1 move all furniture against wall

step 2 make sure that where ever the doggie run there is a clear path

step 3 do not get in the doggies way

step 4 make sure YOU have an ecape route

step 5 make sure you are no where nere the doggie when this happens

step 6 make sure you have a camera in your pocket at all times

step 7 then when you had enough learn the command "enough"

:D:D:D:D :laughing::laughing::laughing: :thumbs up


you spying on me breeze :laughing:

danaekitty
February 19th, 2008, 08:26 AM
Well, here's the update: I brought home my Great Dane ideas and Mike pretty much said no way, they're too big and too lazy. That was the only argument he had, he didn't know anything else about the breed and wasn't interested in learning more. :yell: We talked about it for a long time, I presented all the information I had at hand, and he's still very anti-Dane, but said that if the right one came along he would definitely consider it. Now if only I could convince him that the "right one" is a beautiful blue dane at a breeder and requires a sizeable down payment...:lightbulb:

Isn't it ironic that the one who doesn't actually want the dog is the one doing all the research? I'm pretty mad that I did everything I could to feel better about the situation and he just shot down all the ideas and research I had done.

He doesn't see why it's a bad idea to just bring home a buddy's dog's puppy from a backyard.

I did get him to agree that whatever dog we get is not allowed in our bed EVER (he had the idea that it would be okay if the dog were in bed when I wasn't home) as long as when we have kids the dog can share a bed with them. I think he had fond memories of sleeping with the dog when he was a kid, and I broke his heart a little when I insisted on this. :shrug:

danaekitty
February 19th, 2008, 08:27 AM
Thanks to Goldengal for the insight into the Bernese and the Leonberger. I'll get some more info on these as well.

Chris21711
February 19th, 2008, 09:47 AM
Thanks to Goldengal for the insight into the Bernese and the Leonberger. I'll get some more info on these as well.

They are both such nice souls, get one of each for either side of the bed :D

Kristin7
February 19th, 2008, 12:36 PM
Isn't it ironic that the one who doesn't actually want the dog is the one doing all the research? I'm pretty mad that I did everything I could to feel better about the situation and he just shot down all the ideas and research I had done.

I'd be rather annoyed as well... sounds like you are trying to do things the right way and he isn't thinking things through. He decided you're both getting a dog, it only seems fair to compromise and let you contribute to deciding which dog. Did he say which breed he wants, or doesn't care, as long as it isn't a Dane?

Frenchy
February 19th, 2008, 12:40 PM
if the right one came along he would definitely consider it.

maybe I'm repeating myself but ... have you looked at petfinder.com ? You can see humane societies and rescues in your area. All the dogs have their descriptions and pictures on it so you can look at the ones who would make a good match with your family. :dog:

danaekitty
February 19th, 2008, 12:51 PM
YAY!~ I learned how to multi-quote, finally!!!

I'd be rather annoyed as well... sounds like you are trying to do things the right way and he isn't thinking things through. He decided you're both getting a dog, it only seems fair to compromise and let you contribute to deciding which dog. Did he say which breed he wants, or doesn't care, as long as it isn't a Dane?

His one stipulation is that he can occasionally run with the dog. We both prefer large dogs over small ones. He had a shepherd/husky x growing up, so I think he's reluctant to choose any breed that isn't one of those. He seems to think that getting a dog isn't a big deal at all, and doesn't see why I'm putting so much thought and preparation into it. I mentioned a Boxer, and he said maybe, but after looking into it I think a Boxer would be way to squirrelly for my lifestyle. I really think the only way to ensure that I get the breed I want is to beat him to the punch and find a good rescue, not telling him I'm even looking until I bring him to the one I want.
This is really putting a strain on our relationship, it's so frustrating! He thinks that since he's the one who wants the dog, he should get to call all the shots.

maybe I'm repeating myself but ... have you looked at petfinder.com ? You can see humane societies and rescues in your area. All the dogs have their descriptions and pictures on it so you can look at the ones who would make a good match with your family. :dog:

I have been looking at petfinder, and will continue to do so. We still haven't boughht our house, so it will be at least another 6-12 mos before we can realistically start looking.

Frenchy
February 19th, 2008, 12:52 PM
I have been looking at petfinder, and will continue to do so. We still haven't boughht our house, so it will be at least another 6-12 mos before we can realistically start looking.

Cewl ! :thumbs up

Ford Girl
February 19th, 2008, 01:04 PM
Question - why are you doing all the leg work when it's his idea to get a dog...if it were me, after his turn down of the dane idea, I'd say...ok, you do the research and let me know what dog you are thinking will suit your requirements, call the shelters, get the info...afterall, you don't really want a dog right now anyways, so maybe that will buy you some time...

Thats what I would say to my man... :shrug:

I would seriously take this as a clue to the amount of work you will be doing to raise this puppy compared to the man who wanted it in the first place...:rolleyes: :shrug: If he wants the dog, tell him to do his share starting now, and make sure he knows how much work it is...you know from reading these posts but does he know??? I see a red flag here - sounds like you will end up being the primary care taker??

jessi76
February 19th, 2008, 01:47 PM
This is really putting a strain on our relationship, it's so frustrating! He thinks that since he's the one who wants the dog, he should get to call all the shots.

then he should be doing the research. I agree w/ fordgirl's post above... 100%.

getting a dog, is adding a new member to your family. in no way should it be frustrating, or straining to your relationship. You should both be equally excited and committed to adding this new member.

Personally, I think if it's this frustrating and straining before you even commit to getting one, then now is not the right time to be worrying about it.

danaekitty
February 19th, 2008, 02:02 PM
Another multi-quote opportunity! Woohoo!

Question - why are you doing all the leg work when it's his idea to get a dog...if it were me, after his turn down of the dane idea, I'd say...ok, you do the research and let me know what dog you are thinking will suit your requirements, call the shelters, get the info...afterall, you don't really want a dog right now anyways, so maybe that will buy you some time...


That would be a disaster. If I said that to him, he'd just bring home the first pit-bull that his friend's dog gave birth to, or he'd walk into the humane society and get the youngest most untrained puppy in the place.
I would rather do all the legwork myself than have no say in the matter, and I really don't mind - like I said, things are pretty slow at work right now.


I would seriously take this as a clue to the amount of work you will be doing to raise this puppy compared to the man who wanted it in the first place...:rolleyes: :shrug: If he wants the dog, tell him to do his share starting now, and make sure he knows how much work it is...you know from reading these posts but does he know??? I see a red flag here - sounds like you will end up being the primary care taker??

That is my fear as well. He understands and swears that he will be in charge of the dog's needs - going out first thing in the morning, cleaning poop, etc. So I plan on holding him to that - don't get me wrong, I'd like to be as involved as possible when it comes to raising the pup. I want it to be my buddy just as much as it is Mike's.


Personally, I think if it's this frustrating and straining before you even commit to getting one, then now is not the right time to be worrying about it.

You're right, jessi - there are just so many sides to this issue, but I really need to figure out how to get my way and have Mike think it was his idea, :laughing: so I think starting early will give me a great edge. Maybe I need some advice from some older married ladies, ha ha. Give me a lesson on Husband-Manipulation!

Chris21711
February 19th, 2008, 02:31 PM
danaekitty - I'm an older married lady - lesson in Husband Manipulation - Cut Him Off..............:D

Ford Girl
February 19th, 2008, 02:43 PM
I just know that having just raised a devil of a pup, it's stressful enough!! Never mind the whole..who's cleaning up poop, going to the million vet appts., the costs involved, the discipline, the training...the pup will know if there is a devide in your relationship...and will play that to their advantage. They will take advantage of the things you disagree on...it can create huge behavioral issues = even more work!!

I just meant have him do the research or review several breeds, if you present him with options that suit your requirments, and let him pick from that, then the decison will fit both. Rather then one breed at a time for him to reject. (reminds me of the hungry kid staring in to the full fridge saying there's nothing to eat!! LOL!)

I like to do the research too, but if HE really wants a dog, then HE needs to be involved from the start...I tell ya, this is just the beginning of the work...:laughing: It shouldn't be at all stressful yet.

If you don't have a specific breed in mind, I would contact a few shleters, have them profile you and your DH, and let them help you pick a dog...deciding on a specific breed alone won't gaurentee you will get the perfect dog.

I don't think there is a perfect dog out there, most high energy dogs that would make great running partners wouldn't suit your needs - someone who is so-so on getting a dog, and to be honest, if my man only ran 2 or 3 times MAYBE, I'd tell him to call a human friend to run with him, and I'd get myself a nice medium sized medium energy dog...

They say to never get a dog with an energy level higher then your own. I agree with that 100%.

Ford Girl
February 19th, 2008, 02:51 PM
danaekitty - I'm an older married lady - lesson in Husband Manipulation - Cut Him Off..............:D

:laughing: :laughing: :laughing:

I personally like to let him think he's making choices...for example...I ask...do you want to vaccuum or sweep? ha! Instead of "can you vaccuum the house for me?" Or...Do you want chicken or fish? See, either option is fine by me...they have to pick one...hense letting them think they get to decide. :D

So, I'd pick my top 3 dogs, consider that the dog may get 3 runs a week, and then present those dogs to your DH. Serioulsy, if your DH isn't a constant athelet who runs every day and trains hard for marathons or even does it often enough to count on, I wouldn't use that as a factor in deciding.

danaekitty
February 19th, 2008, 03:41 PM
FordGirl - Thank you so much! Your posts were unspeakably helpful. When the time comes, I will definitely have the shelters profile us and let us know when something appropriate comes in - I didn't know you could do that!
And a very wise statement, "They say to never get a dog with an energy level higher then your own. I agree with that 100%", I think that might drive home a point with Mike.
Thank you also for the advice on presenting a united front so the dog doesn't take advantage. That's what we did for the cats, and it was so easy to train them - although I think we all know that what they do in front of us and when we're out are very different things, ha ha. I hope he takes to heart how important that united front is and doesn't leave me in the cold with things he lets the dog do.
As for the vaccuuming/sweeping - I do the exact same thing! As long as he thinks we're both working, he does things quite cheerfully. We recently divided the house - I keep the bedroom and kitchen clean (easy!) and he's in charge of the living- and bathroom (much more pressure).

Ford Girl
February 19th, 2008, 04:38 PM
FordGirl - Thank you so much! Your posts were unspeakably helpful. When the time comes, I will definitely have the shelters profile us and let us know when something appropriate comes in - I didn't know you could do that!
And a very wise statement, "They say to never get a dog with an energy level higher then your own. I agree with that 100%", I think that might drive home a point with Mike.
Thank you also for the advice on presenting a united front so the dog doesn't take advantage. That's what we did for the cats, and it was so easy to train them - although I think we all know that what they do in front of us and when we're out are very different things, ha ha. I hope he takes to heart how important that united front is and doesn't leave me in the cold with things he lets the dog do.
As for the vaccuuming/sweeping - I do the exact same thing! As long as he thinks we're both working, he does things quite cheerfully. We recently divided the house - I keep the bedroom and kitchen clean (easy!) and he's in charge of the living- and bathroom (much more pressure).

Honestly, my posts are from the heart...not sure if it was just me, or our puppy, but it was a lot of work...still is, every day, never ends...we don't have kids, we have a cat, we like our lazy coffee drinking mornings and watching movies uninterupted...the reason we got a golden is cuz we do lots of camping and out doorsy things, so we figured a golden would be easy cheasy....and of course so friendly to all they meet - cuz the breed is always friendly....right...:rolleyes:

hahah! Boy, did we have a wake up call! Yes, she's the perfect camping dog, loves the water and mud, excellent recall and off leash skills, energy out the ying yang...but the other 9 months of the year we don't camp...she is super high energy, we pay for 2 days of day care per week to drain the batteries...and every single night after work besides day care days, we are required to go right home and spend our evening exercising her...trying laze around in the morning is impossible, and I don't think we've watched a single movie uninterupted since we got her? ha! Plus she's aggressive towards some other dogs...another thing that didn't cross our minds when picking the breed we did...so we spend tones of time, energy and money on training.

Not that I am complaining, thats what having a dog is, building a relationship and having a campanion...but they have needs that need to be met, as well as yours. I jumped in both feet and leanrt so much over the last 18 months, having a difficult dog a blessing in disguise...this site has helped me so much...

Not at all what we planned or envisioned, I wouldn't trade her for another dog ever, we love her to bits, and now all the work we put in is "normal" to us, it's routine...there were nights I was in tears and wondering what the heck did we do...we can laugh about it now, but it was hard.

I just felt like sharing with you cuz if you are on the fence about it, you should know it's not all puppy breath and cuddles...altho the good times out weight the bad for sure...

danaekitty
February 19th, 2008, 04:44 PM
Wow - so don't get a golden, is basically what you're telling me. Ha ha.

Trust me, I know puppies are a pain in the ass. I would much rather adopt an adult dog - but Mike is insistant, plus it would be easier on the cats to have something that at least started out as a small size.

Ford Girl
February 19th, 2008, 04:57 PM
Wow - so don't get a golden, is basically what you're telling me. Ha ha.

Trust me, I know puppies are a pain in the ass. I would much rather adopt an adult dog - but Mike is insistant, plus it would be easier on the cats to have something that at least started out as a small size.

Now, I wouldn't say that - geez, even I woudl get another one, LOL!! Mines a devil in a fur coat...but I would say not to buy from a byb (like us) for health and temperment issues, know the questions to ask when choosing a pup, i.e. personality...and be honest about what you plan on doing with your pup 90% of the time...not what you might do with your dog 10% of the time.

Looking back at Dazy's litter...we missed 2 important things...1. she was the only female in a litter of 7 - and she was the second largest next to her brother Tank 2. she was the only dog trying to escape the pen when we were viewing the litter, showed no interest in us really. But we wanted a girl, and the price was right - and once you go see a litter of pups, it's hard to walk away without chosing one.

Both are very good indicators that she was going to be an independent bossy challanging thing...:rolleyes:

Good thing her moma is bossier then she is!! :laughing:


Thats why we got a pup too, we wanted an older dog, but the old kitty was better off with the puppy, that worked out well for us. The cats the boss and always will be.

Rainy
February 19th, 2008, 05:33 PM
Number 1 thing I would reccomend is to dog-sit for a friend and this way you will see if your cats are even accepting of a dog.My sisters cat attacked my dog and my husband when he was trying to rescue the dog!

I have a cat with my 2 dogs(used to have 2 cats RIP Winnie)and they get along fantastic.
Another thing is to make a list of behaviours or anything else you can think of that you Don't want in a dog.That can help you eliminate alot of breeds.

I suggest that if you ever get a puppy that you get the oldest puppy you can.There is a huge differance between 8 weeks and 12 weeks or IMO 6 months is fantastic!

~michelle~
February 19th, 2008, 06:44 PM
looking at your situation I would definately recommend you steer clear of a husky or a GSD.....

both shed (ALOT)

both require ALOT of exercise.. not a run for a few minutes but a hour to 2 of exercise a day. if they dont get this required exercise they become distructive.

Huskies can be difficult to train and stubborn- never off leash!

GSD's need to be trained well and I wouldnt recommend them for first time owners.

Your husband sounds like he wants a dog but isnt committed to one so i would say no at the moment to any dog IMO

but i definately commend you for researching what dog would suit you.... keep looking, the things you are looking for come with breed, induvidual personality, and training. I dont think your going to find a breed that is going to have all of the characteristics you are looking for so youll need to meet individual dogs and i would suggest talking to a trainer before you bring the dog home to get advice on how to go through the basics.

Rottielover
February 19th, 2008, 07:27 PM
Nope for tigger it was a lot easier adapting to a large dog than a small dog. He knows large ones can not jump as high as he can, LOL

Frenchy
February 19th, 2008, 08:24 PM
Wow - so don't get a golden, is basically what you're telling me. Ha ha.



Now, I wouldn't say that - geez, even I woudl get another one, LOL!!

Yes Ford Girl because they are addictive :cloud9:

danaekitty, older goldens are not as :evil: :laughing:

Gibbons
February 19th, 2008, 11:31 PM
I'm finding this post helpful in my dog-hunt as well, and I feel refreshed for having made some good decisions along the way- I.E., I'm looking into "tricking" hubby into adopting an older dog, I already know I'm going to be the primary care giver of the dog so no worries there, the fosters have made me realize gibson does better with dogs than with other cats (who would've guessed it?) and I've ruled out Huskies and GSD's for first time dogs and am leaning strongly towards goldens :thumbs up

The POINT of this post is not to threadjack- believe it or not- but just to say you're getting some awesome advice here! I'm also thrilled to see you thinking so extensively about this and not just getting the first pup that your husband brings home. Also, working out some sort of method for the dogs is, I think, very important- who is in charge of feeding, the organization for walks (i.e, I do the evening walk HE gets out of bed for the middle-of-the-night outing, etc) would be hugely important so it doesn't become this big issue of "I do everything for this dog and you wanted it." I'm a VERY newly-married so I'm learning here, but figuring it out before hand prevents me for getting resentful.

I also think, and this is a generalization based on a lot of guys that I know- they suck at research. If I told Jeff "you do research on the dog to get," we'd never get a dog because he'd look at 2 sites and call it a day. If you CAN get him to read up and research, great. At the very least, he should be receptive to the wealth of information you're bringing back to the table.

I've currently got my heart set on a burmese/ golden cross (one of our neighbours has one) and he's a big cuddle bug with just the right amount of energy :cloud9:

aslan
February 20th, 2008, 06:43 AM
Well for all the work and stress these little demons bring as babies. Just when you start to get stressed, they pull off a face like this. Now seriously how can you stay stressed.

danaekitty
February 20th, 2008, 10:11 AM
Okay, that is seriously hilarious.

I agree, I value the advice I'm getting to no end.

Thanks to everyone that isn't judging me for a) my dislike of puppies and b)my wish to completely manipulate Mike. Too bad I can never show him this thread, ha ha.

I've been looking into the Berners, and they seem like a pretty good breed as well - less common than the dane, so less chance that he would have seen enough of them at work (he installs satellites in people's houses) to snap judge.

Kristin7
February 20th, 2008, 10:24 AM
As Rainy suggests, I also recommend, if you absolutely have to get a puppy, get an older one... the amount of work you will have to do will be reduced as will the time until they become a more calm adult. An older puppy should be able to control its bladder for a longer time than a baby (think of young human children vs human infant).

A nice English bred lab might fit your bill... at least, the few I've known have seemed rather mellow compared to the American style. The English breds are stockier, if you are not sure what I'm talking about. Of course, I'm sure there are exceptions to this.

Ford Girl
February 20th, 2008, 11:01 AM
As Rainy suggests, I also recommend, if you absolutely have to get a puppy, get an older one... the amount of work you will have to do will be reduced as will the time until they become a more calm adult. An older puppy should be able to control its bladder for a longer time than a baby (think of young human children vs human infant).

A nice English bred lab might fit your bill... at least, the few I've known have seemed rather mellow compared to the American style. The English breds are stockier, if you are not sure what I'm talking about. Of course, I'm sure there are exceptions to this.

I wouldn't reccomend a lab of any line for this particular situation...the english are a tad bit mellower...but still high energy and need rigorous daily exercise....and thier tails will clear a coffee table in one swipe!! They don't always know their own size or are aware of their strength and body presents...they go full force all out 110% all of the time. :clown:

Of course, like Frenchy said...a senior of any breed would be a good choice...a senior lab or golden would be a good thing...

aslan - no doubt!! ha! the goofy faces and silly bahavior makes it hard to stay upset or firm at times...the eyes...the smile...:cloud9: I get that look all the time...I think they know it too!!!

Kristin7
February 20th, 2008, 12:38 PM
Its funny about Labs, some of the most hyper crazy dogs I've met have been labs, and some of the most mellow lazy dogs have been labs. My neighbor has one of the more stocky types, and I keep hoping he'll get tired of having a dog and give her to me. She is big, black and mellow, hardly barks and likes to meet my dog at the fence for some play, on occasion. She is probably too mellow for him though. Anyway, it was a suggestion because there are some very mellow ones out there and would have the temperment desired... too bad Danes are banned by the husband, such cool dogs! This brings to mind something... that you can research all the breeds you want, but there will be variation amongst members of the chosen breed. If you (danaekitty) pick a breed, get a puppy, and it doesn't grow up to be like you expect it will, will you resent your husband, since you don't want a dog to begin with?

Ford Girl
February 20th, 2008, 12:47 PM
Its funny about Labs, some of the most hyper crazy dogs I've met have been labs, and some of the most mellow lazy dogs have been labs. My neighbor has one of the more stocky types, and I keep hoping he'll get tired of having a dog and give her to me. She is big, black and mellow, hardly barks and likes to meet my dog at the fence for some play, on occasion. She is probably too mellow for him though. Anyway, it was a suggestion because there are some very mellow ones out there and would have the temperment desired... too bad Danes are banned by the husband, such cool dogs! This brings to mind something... that you can research all the breeds you want, but there will be variation amongst members of the chosen breed. If you (danaekitty) pick a breed, get a puppy, and it doesn't grow up to be like you expect it will, will you resent your husband, since you don't want a dog to begin with?

I heard they get mellow at 3 years old? LOL!!! At least I am hoping and praying for that!!! :pray: :laughing: Hurry up 3 years old!!! :laughing:

You are right, a breed in itself isn't a guarentee of it's personality...like retrievers that don't retrieve, or swim for that matter... :D

danaekitty
February 20th, 2008, 12:54 PM
If you (danaekitty) pick a breed, get a puppy, and it doesn't grow up to be like you expect it will, will you resent your husband, since you don't want a dog to begin with?

That's a really good question, one that I don't think I can answer, since it's so far into the future. I would hope that by the time I realize this is not the dog I wanted it to be, I would have already fallen in love with the dog that it actually is. :cloud9: Dogs really are a "love the one you're with" situation, I guess, and I have a lot of love in me for all animals, even if they aren't what I expect. A friend of Mike's has a pit X who crapped on all his xbox controllers because he was jealous. :laughing: I laughed my ass off when I heard that. Xbox 360 is a constant sore spot between me and Mike, so if the same thing happens I'll secretly be full of glee!!!:thumbs up
Gibbons said above that as long as things are planned in advance, there shouldn't be any resentment, and I hope this is true. Like I said before, I hear the best way to break up a relationship is to get a dog. So I guess I either like the dog or take the cats and leave.:laughing:

I'm betting at this point that I will ultimately win the Dane war...I want it too much to let it go without a fight. But I am keeping my options with other breeds open (have been starting research immediately after one each suggestion by the pasters above), and will probably take the advice and have a shelter profile us to help us out.

danaekitty
February 22nd, 2008, 04:48 PM
What does everyone think about Newfoundlands?

BHRR
February 23rd, 2008, 10:46 PM
There are 3 Great Dane Breed Specific Rescues in the province of Ontario. GDR, Inc, DID and BHRR.

Gwen

purpledomino - Thanks for the Dane advice. I think at this point I'm really leaning toward one. I'll have to keep my ear to the ground for Dane rescues.

clm
February 23rd, 2008, 10:51 PM
What does everyone think about Newfoundlands?

I've never had a Newf myself, but I know someone who has and she loves the breed. She had a great Pyr and a Newf so she had a big house and lots of land as well. Newfs suffer with the heat in the summer and with those webbed feet of theirs, they like to swim. Big, heavy, drooling dogs, so be prepared, the coats take some work too.

Cindy

clm
February 23rd, 2008, 10:54 PM
There are 3 Great Dane Breed Specific Rescues in the province of Ontario. GDR, Inc, DID and BHRR.

Gwen

Gwen, how many danes do you think come into all these rescue groups in a year? Do you get mostly older danes? I don't see them often, but more often than my breed for sure. I would think their sheer size would put off a lot of millers, I would think they'd stick to most of the smaller breeds, but I could see byb's breeding them.

Cindy

want4rain
February 23rd, 2008, 11:04 PM
uh..... i started another thread for you-
http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=49815

hope you dont mind. :o

-ash

BHRR
February 23rd, 2008, 11:12 PM
I also would not recommend a Great Dane as a 'running partner'. Great Danes can be both heat and cold sensitive. We also own an EM and two Newfs in addition to our 6 Great Danes plus the Rescues we have in our program.

I wish to say that in the 12 years we have operated our Rescue; we have only adopted 2 Great Danes(one was a GDx) to apartments. It is not that we will not consider them. It is more that the people applying do not realise that they still do need exercise; do not wish to put a exercise plan in place and that the best and happiest dog is a well trained, tired one. Dogs barking in apartments out of boredom do not go over well with neighbours.

I, too recommend research the Breed(s) you are interested in, go to shows to meet reputable/quality Breeders and to network and learn more about the Breed(s) you are interested in; try to meet as many of those Breed(s) as possible be it through friends, Breeders, Rescues etc. so that you can see that while each Breed has a 'standard'; they are still individuals at the end of the day. Our Rescue places as per best match personality fit for the home. If a home wants a couch potato; putting a high energy dog into that home would not be in anyone's best interest. I have Dane brothers and one is a high energy SN's boy who would be halfway to Texas if I would let him and his brother is more the 'typical' couch potato Dane and both love to sit in your lap. My 7 year old GD Maggi can also easily put to shame some of the younger Danes that we have in our Rescue program with her own energy level yet my almost 7 year old Brindle(Dragon) is very calm(was born calm and an 'old soul') and Frenchy keeps wanting to take him away! LOL HIM and my EM Guinness! I gotta keep my eyes on that woman! ;) :D

Ask all the questions you can possibly think of about the Breed(s) you are looking into. There truly are no dumb questions. People passionate about their Breed(s); LOVE to talk about them........a lot! :D

I cannot speak for the other Rescues, Shelters etc., yet ours would not consider your home until such time as you and your husband BOTH 100% would embrace an new addition in your home. It is not fair to the human party(ies) that are not completely onboard with the idea; nor is it fair to the dog being adopted. Statistics have shown that adoption failures can be very high in these types of situations.

I am not saying for one minute that you home would not be a GREAT home. What I am saying is that at this time, if you both are not completely on board with the idea; then perhaps waiting and continuing to do what you are doing; researching is really the best. :)

ANOTHER great point made by mastifflover are those Vet Bills. Giant Breeds most certainly come with Giant Vet Bills, especially in emergencies. That is another top reason why dogs are dumped into our Rescue; as people do not really understand or are prepared for the cost of these amazing creatures.

I have been keeping track of the 'average' costs we spend on our Giant Breeds per year sans emergency bills and it is between $1,800 - $2,400 per year per dog.

I think it is very important to know all the good, the bad and any ugly about any Breed out there before bringing them into one's home.

WOW! That became a mini-Gwennie post! :eek:

Danes are great dogs but not a dog that is going to go running with your BF. I own an English Mastiff and live in a small loft big dogs are great in small spaces. Also not a breed that will go running. Giant breeds do have problems in the heat so keep that in mind. Just research the breed you want or in your case don't want. I would suggest not getting a dog since you both do not want one and in my opinion that is not a fair situation for you or the dog. One more thing giant breeds come with giant vet bills.

BHRR
February 23rd, 2008, 11:23 PM
There is one very reputable/quality Blue/Black Breeder in your area that I would recommend.

I have a blue boy myself. He is my new show dog, now 8 month of age; named Bronson. His Breeder is from Ottawa though.

Depending on who you talk too; you will get different answers on the temperament thing.

With having been involved with Great Danes via Rescue and now in the show world for the past 20+ years; I have to say that is always has come down to individual temperaments within the Dane Standard(Rescue or Breeder route) and not the 'colour' per say. Others will say that Harles are more hyper(I have owned many over the years and 4 of my current own Danes are from Harle breedings) but it will depend on who you talk too.

In respect to price, do not be 'sucked in' on the higher the price, the more quality of dog from a Breeder. This is NOT always the case. Furthermore; 'pet' marked does not mean poor quality either from a reputable/quality Breeder. It just means that the pup either through colour, temperament(too hyper or mellow etc.) or their conformation would not be sucessful in the show ring. Very few pups, if any, especially in some Harle Breeding litters for you never know what will 'drop'; will be show quality. Reputable/Quality Breeders breed for the preservation of the Breed Standard and work on improving their own lines and try to ensure that Health(there are no true gurantees in anything and all pedigree lines carry for something yet they work hard at truly minimizing health problems); temperament, soundness, longevity etc.

Gwen


I've also been researching Dane breeders in the area (things are VERY slow at my job this week) and have decided that if I were to have a choice (still haven't decided between breeder and rescue), I LOOOOOVE the look of a Blue Dane. They are breathtakingly beautiful. Does anyone know of any differences between a Blue and, say, a Fawn/Mantle/etc? Differences in personality, temperament, price, etc.

BHRR
February 23rd, 2008, 11:37 PM
My own 2 Goldens(now almost 12) did not stop the 'idiot' and 'high energy social crazies' phases until between 4 and 5. BUT even at the ages they are; they are both still going quite strong. I love that about them yet you are correct; it was not always a walk in the park!!!! AND this comes from myself who is a PMT and a PMB!

Gwen
...the reason we got a golden is cuz we do lots of camping and out doorsy things, so we figured a golden would be easy cheasy....and of course so friendly to all they meet - cuz the breed is always friendly....right...:rolleyes:

hahah! Boy, did we have a wake up call! Yes, she's the perfect camping dog, loves the water and mud, excellent recall and off leash skills, energy out the ying yang...but the other 9 months of the year we don't camp...she is super high energy...

BHRR
February 23rd, 2008, 11:52 PM
I have a Newf and a NewfX and LOVE them! Both Rescues. They love the water, have been a bit more stubborn yet still very eager to work and please and also more independent than my Danes(Danes want to be on top of you, leaning into you, leaning into you; my Newfs want to be close to you yet not necesasrily touching you with their complete bodies; great feet warmers though!!!). I find that my Newfs really like to work. When my husband tries to swim(he is not a great swimmer; was not a LG like I was in my younger days and she will go in after him; just as one of our Goldens does and 'save' him! LOL) She will push him closer and closer to shore until he finally gives up trying to swim! :laughing: Lots of hair, drool, I find them harder to wash(as in their hair type is even more water repellent than my Goldens) and then to get all the soap out etc. A lot more grooming required than my Danes that is for sure yet my one Newf is one of our BHRR Therapy dogs(as are most of our Danes) and when my other Newf is older; I have plans to have him join our program too.

Mine are also great with kids!

They compliment my home well with the Danes as they are equally as gentle and kind.

Both of my Newfs have HD yet my oldest one is almost 9 now and still going strong! :thumbs up

I feel that with any breed; socialising and training are huge in ensuring any pet additions become assets to not only the person's home but their communities.

JMH(humble)O of course!

What does everyone think about Newfoundlands?

BHRR
February 24th, 2008, 12:09 AM
Cindy,

I cannot speak for the other ON GD Rescues; and ours is much smaller than the other two(in respect to bringing Danes into our own program directly) but we assist all across NA where we can; and via our program(either by bringing in the dogs here or finding other Rescues - in ON or other provinces or if they are in the US; there)to take the Danes in need as we are almost always full with a waiting list; we assisted 73 Great Danes last year.

Most are between 11 months - 18 months of age for us. Just when they are getting too big for their owners to try and 'man' handle for people have not taken the time to bring them to OB; did not think that spaying/neutering them was important so the hormones are kicking in and we have Danes in heat or pregnant or males beginning to mark and become 'boobs' with 'tude'; or the brains have now hit the 'second idiot' phase as I like to call it and the dog is back to square one with acting like they know nothing and possibly chewing and destroying things etc.(THOSE are Giant Breed mouths capable of giant destruction!) AND because a lot of people have not done their research, they were not aware and at the age of 11 - 18 months become ALL too aware of how big the Danes are getting, the gas, drool, counter surfing, happy tail, cost of regular vetting, food, why obedience and socialising is so important and so forth.

We do not get a lot of Seniors in our program and they are the easiest for us to place. For us, it has been those 3-5 years old that have been the hardest to place but in the past 2 years; with how the market has become completed saturated with GD's; adoptions have been slow off and on for all the GD Rescues.

Some people would much rather deliberately go to that byber(easier to get a puppy as there is no detailed process; did no research, get possible questionable temperament/health bred problems), plunk down their $$$$ without any questions and then maybe think about fully vetting, altering, training, feeding etc. the Dane; over going to a reputable/quality Rescue and adopting for a nominal fee(who will fully vet, alter, microchip, temperament test, some obedience etc.) or go to that reputable/quality Breeder and have an adoption(Rescue) or Buyer(Breeder) thorough process and be placed with the right personality fit for their home. They will also get the support via a reputable/quality Rescue or Breeder over that byber and those Rescues and Breeders will stand by their animals and take them back if/when necessary.

:sorry::offtopic: :o

Gwen, how many danes do you think come into all these rescue groups in a year? Do you get mostly older danes? I don't see them often, but more often than my breed for sure. I would think their sheer size would put off a lot of millers, I would think they'd stick to most of the smaller breeds, but I could see byb's breeding them.

Cindy

Frenchy
February 24th, 2008, 10:42 AM
my almost 7 year old Brindle(Dragon) is very calm(was born calm and an 'old soul') and Frenchy keeps wanting to take him away! LOL HIM and my EM Guinness! I gotta keep my eyes on that woman! ;) :D



You are totally wrong here Gwen ..... you forgot Maggie :D I want Dragon , Guiness AND Maggie. :lovestruck: :lovestruck: :lovestruck:

BHRR
February 24th, 2008, 07:38 PM
LOL LOL My apologises....my error comletely! :D :p

Guinness sure does WUV you too! :goodvibes: Maggi, what a wonderful gal that one is! :) :angel:

I hope you can come back out again soon. We have a March date set for our next mini-open house and I will send you the date/time JUST in case! ;) I do not think that you have met Hamilton the Newf yet either.

You are totally wrong here Gwen ..... you forgot Maggie :D I want Dragon , Guiness AND Maggie. :lovestruck: :lovestruck: :lovestruck:

Frenchy
February 24th, 2008, 07:44 PM
We have a March date set for our next mini-open house and I will send you the date/time JUST in case! ;) I do not think that you have met Hamilton the Newf yet either.

A newbie ? I'll try to make it :goodvibes:

Rottielover
February 24th, 2008, 07:47 PM
OH>>OH>>OH GWEN, if Frenchy comes, can I come too :), I want the honor of meeting you and your crew too :)

BHRR
February 24th, 2008, 08:16 PM
OMG! THAT honour would be ALLLLLLLLLLLLL mine! ABSOLUTELY come on over! Bring a big appetite, don't wear black (HEE!) and be prepared to stay awhile! :thumbs up :D

Gwen
OH>>OH>>OH GWEN, if Frenchy comes, can I come too :), I want the honor of meeting you and your crew too :)

danaekitty
February 25th, 2008, 10:32 AM
Gwen - Thank you so much for your detailed replies! It's good to talk to someone who actually works for dane rescue and has unlimited experience.
I'm glad you mentioned how the amount of $$$ does not necessarily constitute the better dog - a breeder close to me was asking over 1700$, which is definitely out of my league, whereas one I found on puppyfind, in the states, was only 200$. Both blues. I am wondering what the name is of the breeder in my area you would recommend...?

Thanks also for your info on Newfs. I love the idea, but I don't get to swim a lot...the closest place I could take it would be the Thames River:yuck:...the city found a radioactive blob in there a few years back.

I know that we both have to be on board for a dog before we can realistically get one. I'm getting there...starting to catch the puppy fever the more I search.

danaekitty
February 25th, 2008, 10:40 AM
Good idea want4rain !
Great dane : although a big breed , they don't take that much space , and Nelly NEVER knocks things over , even when she has the zoomies inside the house LOL. (I might have to re do the bed when she does though!!) they do need exercise but nothing like a Border collie :D

Bad sides : prone to bloathing , they can't exercise before and after meals. Oh and , they eat a lot :D

Also : any dog that you would adopt from a rescue , the foster family gets to know the dog and are able to match the right dog with the right family. :thumbs up



Jeez, that's funny. The more I hear about Danes, the more I want one!
Mike suggested a Border Collie, but you say they need a LOT of excercise? Like how much per day?

I don't know whether to post my questions on this thread or the other -
http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?p=552339#post552339 -I'll do both I guess.

Out of curiousity, how many of you let your dogs on your bed? What are the rules?

danaekitty
February 25th, 2008, 11:39 AM
Gwen - I'm trying to find the website for DID - can you send me a link?

Kristin7
February 25th, 2008, 11:54 AM
Here's some info on border collies:
http://www.k9web.com/dog-faqs/breeds/bordercollies.html

They do need a lot of exercise...offhand I can't think of a dog breed that would need much more exercise than a BC. They are intense and bred to work, they really need a job to do and if they don't have one they can be neurotic and destructive - if you are interested in agility training or something like that, a BC would be a good breed, however, sounds like you are looking for a more low-key kind of a dog... oh, they are also very smart, and will keep you on your toes. I love them but probably will never have a purebred as I don't think I could handle their energy level. Both my dogs have been BC mixes though and weren't what I would call high energy.

Frenchy
February 25th, 2008, 12:16 PM
Out of curiousity, how many of you let your dogs on your bed? What are the rules?

There's not too many rules at my place but I wouldn't do this with dominant dogs. I also live alone so I don't have anyone nagging because my dogs are on the bed/couch :D

Kristin7 is right about border collies , not only they need exercise , they need to work ... very intelligent working dog. They do best in an very active family and at agility classes.

jessi76
February 25th, 2008, 12:31 PM
my dog is allowed on the bed, and the 3 rules are...

he must be invited up first.
he must leave when asked.
and the most important rule..... ABSOLUTELY NO BUTT LICKING IN BED.

danaekitty
February 25th, 2008, 12:43 PM
EEK!!! I just read that danes can sometimes have a high prey instinct with small cats!!! My cats are quite small!! Any truth to this?!?

Frenchy
February 25th, 2008, 12:46 PM
EEK!!! I just read that danes can sometimes have a high prey instinct with small cats!!! My cats are quite small!! Any truth to this?!?

I have 2 cats and IMO , it depends on the cats. None of my dogs or fosters ever chased them because they don't run away ! :laughing: If cats run , dogs will run after them. If cat confronts dog , dog usually will be the one running away ! :laughing: But BEFORE you take your new dog home , you will have to get him tested with cats.

danaekitty
February 25th, 2008, 12:56 PM
Frenchy - If I get a puppy, will this lessen the chance of my cats being eaten?

Frenchy
February 25th, 2008, 12:59 PM
Frenchy - If I get a puppy, will this lessen the chance of my cats being eaten?

Maybe ..... but then the puppy might be too excited for the cats .... it would have to be already use to cats ? Some dogs are prey drive , some others not .... and like I posted , if your cats run away from the pup :eek:

danaekitty
February 25th, 2008, 01:01 PM
So do you think that this is common with all dogs, then, not necessarily just danes?
And if it's a puppy, I can train it to respect the cats, I'm sure...Cats are boss?

Frenchy
February 25th, 2008, 01:03 PM
Not every breed are prey drive but then again , in each breed , not all dogs are alike. I know CLM (member here) already had cats when she got her 2 pups , maybe she could offer some advices ...

clm , where are you ? :D

want4rain
February 25th, 2008, 01:28 PM
our limitations for Mister are no couches, no beds, no upstairs although we are talking about allowing him to sleep up stairs with my 8yo daughter.

if he were a smaller dog, we would probably give him free run of the house but because he is all of 95lbs and we knew he would be big from the get go we made the decision early on to keep him out of places he was too big to reasonably fit into. he is longer than the upstairs hall is wide and he can easily span the end of our bed (a king). to say though, Cailyn sleeps on a single but i dont think she would mind the company. when we can afford to get him one of those huge beds, i think he can start sleeping up there. i think they are $20 at SAMS but other things are higher on our priority list right now.

we are raw feeders so he only eats outside. since he is still considered a puppy we NEVER leave him alone in the house (as 'baby proofed' as it is) when we leave. he is kenneled.

have you thought about dietary needs?? training classes in your area?

there are tons of little tidbits ive picked up along the way such as my dog HATES metal dishes. id strongly suggest ceramic and just throwing them in the dishwasher every day or every other day. there are quite a few high quality kibble but i also strongly support raw feeding. its worked sooooo well for us. we taught Mister to ring a bell to let us know he has to potty. it was a fun game of which he was oh so delighted to participate in. lots of going outside because he rang the bell but didnt hav eto go but id rather make more trips than needed than less. ;) we also hand fed while Mister was still on kibble. it helped teach him to sit, down and stay but unfortunately it also taught him to do ALL of them... regardless of what you called it. :o

-ashley

danaekitty
February 25th, 2008, 01:38 PM
Ash - so many great ideas! The FSM would be proud:thumbs up.
I'd never heard of a Raw diet before this forum - is it significantly more expensive than high-grade kibble? Especially considering I'll be getting a LARGE dog.

I have this metal dog dish that I saved from Shadow, my childhood GSD. I really want whatever dog I get to use that dish - once it's big enough.

And HOW on EARTH did you bell-train your dog? I am truly amazed.

Mike and I have decided not to let the dog sleep in our bed, but once we have kids, the dog can sleep in theirs. I had to push really hard for this - one of Mike's fave things about dogs is sleeping with them. I'm still not entirely convinced that he won't let the dog in bed when I'm not home - which would cause serious issues, not only with the dog's sense of who's in charge and what she's allowed to do, but also with my relationship with Mike. I refuse to sleep in dog sheets.

deb12
February 25th, 2008, 01:48 PM
[QUOTE=danaekitty;546943]Breeze - I'm looking for gentle, smart breeds. Easy to train, able to run with Mike, yet content to sit and watch tv with me, sometimes for hours. Large ones preferably. I loved my shepherd, but she shed a LOT. A breed that is good with moody cats. Most importantly, a dog that will LISTEN. A friend of mine has a beagle that never listens...well, she listens and then blatantly ignores. Also, a dog that will hold her poo until I get home from work, ha ha.



Wow Danaekitty,

We have the exact opposite, I know a lot about different breeds (as I have worked in grooming and as a Vet assisitant, but....) my husband is very particular about what he wants and I am unsure it will find in our life style (been waiting for years, finally got a border collie to have the puppy pass on in 4 months :cry:)

My husband wants a Yorkie, female....I have two kids, that are very good with animals...my 8 year old dd volunteers at Upper Credit Humane Society. But Yorkie rescues are hard to find and even harder to release to a young girl.

Deb

deb12
February 25th, 2008, 01:51 PM
OOPS!!!! What a :loser: I am..... That fact that I have an 8 year old they will not release a pup to me. Not that my dd will be the care taker!!!!

:D Sorry

Deb

clm
February 25th, 2008, 02:12 PM
Not every breed are prey drive but then again , in each breed , not all dogs are alike. I know CLM (member here) already had cats when she got her 2 pups , maybe she could offer some advices ...

clm , where are you ? :D

Here I am, :laughing:

Yep, I had 3 indoor and 1 indoor/outdoor cat when I got the pups. The cats found the pups interesting until they realized the pups would chase them.
The pups are not allowed upstairs or in the basement, so the second floor and the basement are cat safe. The main floor, the cats take their chances on when the mood strikes them. :laughing:
Actually, now that the pups are almost a year old, the cats are liking them better. They're not quite as rough and tumble with the cats as they were when they were little. The big indoor/outdoor cat does't like the dogs at all, but he'll come around once they slow down a little more. He learned to like my previous dog, I'm sure he'll come around to these 2.
The dogs have been taught not to bite the cats, and that was no mean trick as at first they thought they were toys. But they can't resist chasing them if the cats run, and the cats do run just for the fun of the chase a lot of the time.
My 2 previous dogs were both swatted across the nose by my resident cats to be shown who was boss, and that's all it took with them to learn to leave them alone, but the cats have not done this to either of my pups yet. Just a matter of time with the big indoor/outdoor guy I'm sure. :rolleyes:
I think it was a lot easier teaching a single pup to leave the cats alone.....the 2 together have proved to be a lot more difficult in this regard.

Cindy

danaekitty
February 25th, 2008, 02:25 PM
CLM - I'm worried that the cats will like me less once I ruin their lives with a puppy. Do you think their mannerisms with me and Mike will change, and that amazing bond will be broken? Will the cats go back to being themselves once they're used to the dog?

This is one of the biggest reasons why I'm not crazy about the dog idea. My bond with my cats has always been important to me, and I love their personalities so much, it would be a shame if the dog made them into different people, so to speak.

breeze
February 25th, 2008, 02:31 PM
danaekitty
about the bed issue,
1) Bree is not allowed on the bed unless invited. she is only allowed on the bed when Mike leave for work in the morning and is only allowed on the bottom on mikes side on the comforter.. she is not allowed on the blankets or sheets..

2) there is no play allowed on the bed

3) she must get down when asked, if she doesn't she is not allowed on the bed any more..

4) she is not allowed on the chair that is in my room either..

5) also when it is bed time there is no playing in our room, we save that for outside or in our living room..

she does sleep in our room on her huge pillow..

Kristin7
February 25th, 2008, 03:22 PM
The bed thing: Guinness shows zero interest in being on my bed. He also isn't interested in the couch or any other piece of furniture. He never has been interested either, so I decided not to encourage him to get up on things. It's bad enough that my cats are all over the furniture, shedding, sitting on my face while I'm sleeping, taking over my pillow... so certainly don't need anymore fur on my bed!!! He sleeps in my room, on his own bed on the floor. I only hope the next dog I get also is not interested in furniture... personally, I'd rather not have a dog on the bed, or the couch or chairs. My last dog, Sydney loved being on the bed and couch but wasn't allowed because she was incontinent. Yes, I did let her sleep with me and that's when I found out she had a problem. Aside from fur and pee accidents, sometimes dogs come running in the house and jump on furniture, if you don't wipe off their feet, expect to have muddy furniture at some point because the dog isn't going to not go on the furniture just because they have dirty feet!

want4rain
February 25th, 2008, 03:26 PM
i was CRUSHED!! my childhood cocker spaniel, brought her bowl home from my folks house and Mister totally turned his nose up to it. :sad: i was sooo bummed out. she was the kindest soul to see me through a rather lonely childhood.

we have found raw feeding is much less expensive than quality kibble and also much much healthier. its also easier on us because we prefer to keep a zero waste house and thats a little hard when Jeffrey (my 2yo) decides some things look better on the floor... in the carpeting... in the dogs mouth.... i swear, he has done a better job training Mister than i have!!! i can account for the stuff Jeffrey feeds him, whats left over from our meals or supplies. its an absolute piece of cake to feed a larger dog because more often than not, grocery portions are just the right size for daily or every other day feeding. some days Mister gets a whole chicken, he eats what he wants and in the winter buries it in the back yard (YUCK!!! EWWW!!!) or in the summer we bring it back into the fridge.

also, Mister is well over a year old and the cats are JUST now starting to accept him. we only drew the line at the cats really really laying into him as we figured they were the best ones to teach him boundaries. and boy did they ever!!! they never actually drew blood out of scratches but he had a few holes in his muzzle and Baby Girl still chases him around on occasion. otherwise he is quite submissive and obedient to the cats. they never hated us for bring him home but for the first few months they hid upstairs or in our bedroom. we actually never had to teach Mister to not go upstairs. the cats did that for us. we reinforce it sometimes but ive seen our cats run from across the upstairs to chase him back down so they made THAT job easier for us. they like their territory uncontaminated by dog. :laughing:

=ashley

clm
February 25th, 2008, 03:28 PM
Your kitties will still love you even if you disrupt their lives with a dog.

Mine look at the pups with disgust from time to time, but they still come to us for loads of love and affection.

Cindy

Ford Girl
February 25th, 2008, 03:46 PM
I have a cat and brough home a tiny puppy...the cat was the boss, but the main thing here....my cat doesn't run...the prey drive is triggered by running of the prey...so when my cat didn't run - and in fact advanced on the dog, it was clearly the boss. Anbd my cat doesn't even have claws!! :laughing: He's that brave and grumpy!!

As for the bed/furniture, I think it has alot to do with the personality of the dog...more dominet dogs need to be kept in line, some dogs just accept their place and will be fine with it.

Dazy doesn't sleep on the bed or with us, she is allowed in there only when supervised and only to lay on the bed and wait...any play, wreslting or refusal to get off is unacceptable in our house...she is allowed on the couch - but that comes with a price too - when we go visiting, she assumes she is allowed on all couches, some people have nice furniture and don't like my big hairy drooly dog on their furniture...thats the tricky part cuz you can't expect them to rationalize...

But she kennels and pen extremely well, so I never felt the need to have her closer to us, she slept in our room crated until she was about 6 or 7 months old, and it got hot outside, then she basically refused to sleep in our room and wanted to be in her pen in the cool dining room. We were worried we'd have to move her out ourselves - being a young newly married couple - having a dog in your room isn't always ideal! :whistle::whistle:

Ford Girl
February 25th, 2008, 03:51 PM
Your kitties will still love you even if you disrupt their lives with a dog.

Mine look at the pups with disgust from time to time, but they still come to us for loads of love and affection.

Cindy

LOL! Totally true...Pubert think Dazy is the most disgusting creature on the planet...:rolleyes: You can see it in his eyes...thinking.."well - I've never!" or "stupid dogs"...:rolleyes: In the voice of Stewie from the Family Guy...

Dazy always keeps an eye on him if he walks by her dish or bone, and he's like..."as if I'd ever stoop so low as to drink from your slobbery dish or eat that disgusting thing" :rolleyes:

Cats do adjust eventually, they keep you feeling guilty while keeping the dog on it's toes...:laughing: My cat keeps the dog in line for no reason some days...just walks up to her and goes all kung foo on her face...:evil: :laughing:

danaekitty
February 25th, 2008, 04:10 PM
LOL - I love cats that get that need to kung-fu and then run away... it's hilarious!
You're making me feel much better about the dog-cats thing. I think I'll start inviting my friends' dogs over more often (all my gfs have these tiny yappy dogs that just know I hate them, so this is a big step for me) and get the cats used to another species, at least.
Zelda's not the biggest fan of Olive, after their war a couple months back, so I think her tolerance level may be okay for a dog, once she learns that she's the boss.

Gibbons
February 25th, 2008, 06:01 PM
Danae, I wouldn't worry too much about the dog thing. I think the cats are generally pretty happy with bossing around something that will (eventually, at least) be so much bigger than themselves! It just reinfoces the notion that they are the kings of the castle.

I also found- weirdly, maybe, but my cat is weird!- that having dogs has reinforced my relationship with my cat. Maybe he's jealous of the dogs getting attention, but he's also a lot cuddlier.

In either case, when my sister was living with us with her cat, Gibson wouldn't come near me. He got very snooty about it. He is not up to sharing the house with another cat. When we got dogs he was like, "ah-ha, you have brought home subjects for me to rule! Good thinking, human, why didn't I think of that? For this, you get cuddle time with the mighty King Gibson!"

If the cats run, though, dogs who aren't familiar with the antics of cats will chase- not necesarially to EAT the cat, just to be like "chase? This is a game? I like games!" If your cat is very liable to be stressed by chasing, then maybe get a dog who is used to cats. If your cat will just give them a good swat for getting too nosy, then no worries about that.

BHRR
February 25th, 2008, 10:22 PM
http://www.danesindistress.com/index.php


Gwen - I'm trying to find the website for DID - can you send me a link?

BHRR
February 25th, 2008, 10:48 PM
PM sent..... :)

Just be sure to ask many questions including those about health testing etc. There are many bybers out there that will sell you a pup for $1,500 but they are anything but reputable/quality. I would gladly pay $$$$ if it meant that I am getting a quality pup from a great reputable Breeder whom I trust who is breeding for the preservation of the Breed Standard; and not for the making of $$$$ and they breed for health, temperament, soundness, longevity over paying a lesser fee for a byber dog that I could then be dumping thousands of dollars in Vet bills as they have medical issues; let alone any temperament one's.

If you find that someone is reluctant to answer your honest yet very friendly/courteous questions, becomes defensive, does not health test, throws out things like 'comes from Championship lines' etc. or is not open in having you visit them, does not require non show puppies(show puppies need specific contracts too) to be altered etc. etc., has many litters a year, breeds the same bitch over and over and over and over again, does not believe in titling dogs(Conformation, Obedience etc.),do not stand by their dogs and won't take them back if needed; those are JMHO some 'red' flags.

Also, when you purchase a dog from a reputable/quality Breeder, no matter the breed; the dog should look like that Breed. For example, I love my GD Rescues to pieces yet some look like Black Labs, others like Greyhounds or Pitbulls and it is not that I do not love them or do not like the Breeds they resemble; yet that is not what a GD should look like.


Gwen
Gwen - Thank you so much for your detailed replies! It's good to talk to someone who actually works for dane rescue and has unlimited experience.
I'm glad you mentioned how the amount of $$$ does not necessarily constitute the better dog - a breeder close to me was asking over 1700$, which is definitely out of my league, whereas one I found on puppyfind, in the states, was only 200$. Both blues. I am wondering what the name is of the breeder in my area you would recommend...?

I know that we both have to be on board for a dog before we can realistically get one. I'm getting there...starting to catch the puppy fever the more I search.

BHRR
February 25th, 2008, 10:53 PM
Many Danes have more of a 'play' drive with smaller animals that can often be mistaken for 'prey' dive. They need to learn how to be 'gentle' as they are truly unaware of their size. Yes, some can/do have a 'prey' drive. Yet if you have cats; a great Breeder or Rescue would place appropriately. Proper integration is also important for success too. :)

In my home(of which we have 17 dogs here at this time..yes, all in the home living in harmony...and I vacuum 3 times a day.....LOL...LP and Frenchy can vouch for how well everyone interacts! LOL); most of the Danes here are actually afraid of cats.

Gwen

EEK!!! I just read that danes can sometimes have a high prey instinct with small cats!!! My cats are quite small!! Any truth to this?!?

BHRR
February 25th, 2008, 11:03 PM
I love RAW and fed it to my beloved RIP GD Frost 'T' (my avatar) as he had 3 heart conditions. It was not more expensive for me to feed compared to kibble. I feed the rest of my gang; three home cooked meals a week in addition to Canidae.

In respect to sleeping in a kids bed; I would not allow that until a child is old enough. I believe that most kids and most dogs are JUST wonderful/beautiful together yet feel that there should be supervision up until a certain age for the children/dog interaction. Dogs often do not regard children has 'leaders' and accidents do/can happen. My two are 4 & 7 and none of the dogs are allowed to sleep with them. The dogs would 'push' the kids out of the bed as they stretched out and they would be sleeping on the floor! Our rule in our home is they are not allowed on anything leather. If they are on my bed; they get off when I ask them too etc. I am the leader in my home and via mutual respect, proper obedience, correct communication etc.; there are no issues with listening. One has to be consistent with the rules and it is much easier to have them in place first and follow-up each and every time there is a 'break' then to be completely lax, let the dog rule the house and then try to tighten up the reins later.

I have to have what I call 'organized chaos' to have the home that I have with the dogs, horses, rescue etc.

I'd never heard of a Raw diet before this forum - is it significantly more expensive than high-grade kibble? Especially considering I'll be getting a LARGE dog.

Mike and I have decided not to let the dog sleep in our bed, but once we have kids, the dog can sleep in theirs. I had to push really hard for this - one of Mike's fave things about dogs is sleeping with them.

danaekitty
February 29th, 2008, 03:23 PM
Does anyone know what kind of dog it is that Jin gives to Sun on Lost? Is it a chow chow?

BHRR
March 1st, 2008, 08:42 PM
Sharpei

Gwen

Does anyone know what kind of dog it is that Jin gives to Sun on Lost? Is it a chow chow?

luckypenny
March 1st, 2008, 09:43 PM
In my home(of which we have 17 dogs here at this time..yes, all in the home living in harmony...and I vacuum 3 times a day.....LOL...LP and Frenchy can vouch for how well everyone interacts! LOL)
Gwen

:thumbs up Yep, we just loved all the interaction...our interaction with all the dogs :D . Mostly kissy-slobbery-hugging interactions :goodvibes: . What I can't get over.... your home is so clean! I have a hard time keeping up with three :o .

Frenchy
March 1st, 2008, 09:50 PM
Mostly kissy-slobbery-hugging interactions :goodvibes: .

:cloud9: just like visiting grand parents :laughing:

:sorry: Just kidding :p

luckypenny
March 1st, 2008, 10:47 PM
I much prefer slobbering dogs over slobbering grandparents :laughing: .

BHRR
March 2nd, 2008, 05:38 PM
Sean does call me the 'clean freak' LOL I am so bad that it is not unknown for me to even whip out the vacuum while guests are here. :o :o It is important for us to have people over(and we try to have a mini open house monthly) to see how we live, how the dogs live and are being taken care of(that they are not living in cages but freely being spoiled in our home, are healthy etc.) and it is also great socially for both animals and us humans! :D

Hopefully, you can come visit later this month? :fingerscr :goodvibes: Sent you the date/time etc. via email! :)

Gwen
PS: AND I am sure your home is as wonderful as you are!

:thumbs up Yep, we just loved all the interaction...our interaction with all the dogs :D . Mostly kissy-slobbery-hugging interactions :goodvibes: . What I can't get over.... your home is so clean! I have a hard time keeping up with three :o .