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RABIES ALERT issued by Toronto Public Health

clm
January 23rd, 2008, 09:41 PM
Hubby heard this on 680 news on his way home.

Toronto Public Health has issued a rabies alert for people who were at the Dr. Flea’s flea market near Albion and Highway 27 on January 13. The alert was issued because a border collie puppy at the flea market died from rabies.



The person who bought the puppy took it to a vet, because the dog was ill. The puppy ended up at the Toronto Humane Society, where it died on Monday.



Anybody who may have been in contact with the puppy is urged to get in touch with health officials. There were as many as 11 other dogs sold that same weekend at the location and authorities are concerned because it is difficult to track them all down.



Rabies can be spread by coming into contact with saliva from an affected animal, so those who were licked by the dog and may have a cut or an open wound on their skin could be at risk.



The animals came from a farm in the Grey-Bruce area.



The puppy bit a worker at the Humane Society and the worker received the vaccine against the disease in hospital and has been given a clean bill of health.



Rabies can be fatal if not treated promptly. People who think they may have come in contact with the puppy, or other dogs, in question, can their doctor or call Toronto Public Health at (416) 338-7600.

Luba
January 23rd, 2008, 09:56 PM
Wow that's a rare situation and I didn't hear about this thanks for posting.

I wonder if the thread title could be changed though to something more specific:

RABID PUPPY AT DR. FLEA'S, Public health alert?

That way anyone who's been there will see it first off.

Animals came from a farm or a mill? I'm gonna keep my eyes/ears peeled on this story. Thanks again for posting it.

clm
January 23rd, 2008, 10:03 PM
I know, scary....all the other dogs sold at the flea market too, not to mention if anyone had taken their dog with them shopping at the market that had contact with the puppy. That poor puppy didn't have much of a life did it. :sad:

Cindy

Stacer
January 23rd, 2008, 10:23 PM
I heard about it on this evening's news. The story ended with Tre Smith (the animal control officer at the centre of that controversy this summer) saying that reputable breeders don't sell puppies at flea markets. I hope alot of people heard that last comment.

RIP little puppy.

Luba
January 23rd, 2008, 11:13 PM
http://www.toronto.ca/health/
I don't know if this is a picture of the dog in question but it's what they have on their site at Toronto Public Health. If it's just a picture of a random dog then that was stupid because people will be looking at the picture. This is the copied PDF media news release:

http://www.toronto.ca/health/images/rabies_pic.gif

Toronto Public Health is investigating human exposure to rabies from dogs purchased at a Toronto flea market.


Visit our website at www.toronto.ca
News Release
January 23, 2008
Toronto Public Health investigating rabies exposures

Toronto Public Health is investigating human exposure to rabies from dogs purchased at a Toronto flea market. One puppy purchased at booth #1513 at Dr. Flea's Hwy 27 & Albion Rd Flea Market on Sunday, January 13 tested positive for rabies after being brought to the Toronto Humane Society.


Toronto Public Health is asking people to call 416-338-7600 if they have touched or purchased a puppy from this booth on Sunday, January 13. This line will be open until 9:00 p.m. Wednesday and then will re-open at 8:30 a.m. Thursday. Rabies is a rare condition in Ontario, and, if left untreated, is usually fatal for humans and animals. People who have been exposed to rabies must be vaccinated to prevent illness. The rabies virus is found in the saliva of a rabid animal and can be spread through a bite, cut or
scratch, or if the saliva comes in contact with the moist tissues of the mouth, nose or eyes. Toronto Public Health is reminding the public to purchase or adopt animals from reputable sources and always ensure that the mother of the puppies has been vaccinated. It is also important that all pets have up-to-date rabies vaccinations.
Several other health units in the surrounding area are involved in this investigation, which is ongoing. Further updates will be provided as necessary.
For more information, visit www.toronto.ca/health. Rabies information can also be found at
http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/public/program//pubhealth/rabies/qa/rabies_qa.html.

Media Contact: Susan Sperling, Media Relations Coordinator, Toronto Public Health, 416-
338-7974, ssperli@toronto.ca

Luba
January 23rd, 2008, 11:16 PM
From CFTO News website:
(hey atleast they know what a border collie looks like lol)

http://images.ctv.ca/archives/CTVNews/img2/20080123/160_dog_080123.jpg


Alert issued for 60 people connected to rabid puppy
toronto.ctv.ca

Toronto Public Health is trying to locate at least 60 people who may have come into contact with a rabid dog sold at a city flea market.

Health officials would like to hear from anyone who may have come into contact with the puppy -- or any puppy sold at booth number 1513 at Dr. Flea's Market, at Highway 27 and Albion Rd., on Jan. 13.

"This dog was at a very busy flea market and we're not exactly sure how many people came into contact with this animal," said Tre Smith of the Toronto Humane Society.

Concerns arose after a sick dog bit a worker at the Toronto Humane Society about one week ago. The border collie cross died later that night, and test results showed it had rabies.

"It's very, very scary and very concerning. Rabies is real and it's potentially fatal to whoever contracts it," said Smith.

According to Toronto Public Health, rabies is a rare condition in Ontario. But since it can be deadly for humans, people who are exposed to the rabies virus must be vaccinated to prevent illness.

The virus is found in the saliva of a rabid animal and can be spread through a bite, cut, or scratch. It can also be transmitted if the saliva comes into contact with the moist tissues of the mouth, nose, or eyes.

The worker who was bitten by the dog has received rabies shots and is doing fine, but health officials say others may still be at risk.

There were two other puppies in the cage with the infected dog. It's believed the dog comes from a breeder in the Owen Sound.

Officials say the incident highlights the need for customers to do their homework before buying pets.

"Licensed and responsible breeders don't sell dogs at flea markets for 200 dollars," said Smith.

Luba
January 23rd, 2008, 11:20 PM
I normally wouldn't do this but I emailed the media contact and asked about the picture of the dog on their website if it's one of the dogs in question or not. If not it's not a good idea to post this picture.

krdahmer
January 23rd, 2008, 11:58 PM
Selling puppies at a flea market? :sad::frustrated::cry:

:rip: Little one.:pray:

clm
January 24th, 2008, 07:29 AM
Could you imagine if the puppy hadn't died at the Humane Society.....if it had died with the people who bought it, they may never have taken it to a vet to find out why it died or a vet may not have though to have it tested for rabies. :eek:

I sure hope they're making that Owen Sound so called breeder's life miserable because of this.

Cindy

happycats
January 24th, 2008, 08:31 AM
Stupid people buy this poor pup at the flea market, find out it's sick then dump it a the Humane Society:sad:

The Owen sound "BY breeder" should be charged and closed down!!:mad:

:rip: you have finally found your loving forever home:candle:

CearaQC
January 24th, 2008, 08:40 AM
Ok.... how does a puppy contract Rabies? From it's mother? It has to come from somewhere. And if a puppy was raised properly in right conditions it should never normally have exposure to rabies, right? I really don't know.... not being sarcastic and curious how the whole thing could have occurred.

What if the pups were born/raised by the dam in an outside kennel with barely any human interaction at all? :eek: Maybe I'm jumping the gun, but I hope they search. The whole story stinks like a puppy mill scenario.

That story ticks me off. Whoever was selling those puppies deserves to have their property searched, all dogs removed and also receive the rabies injection.

Do they still do it through the gut? I hope it hurts. lol :evil:

clm
January 24th, 2008, 10:09 AM
I've read more articles on this. CP24, CTV News, Etobicoke news, some say that there were at least 10 other puppies sold, another says another puppy yorki-cross was bought there and had died but was cremated and not tested. One report says that the pups mom was exposed to a rabid skunk on the farm.
Considering that this disease is fatal, I would think all the human society sites as should have alerts about this as well, at least the Toronto and Etobicoke humane societies.
One report said that the pups breeder had been notified.....ok, notified, not investigated? Was the mother vaccinated? How many dogs does this breeder have? Are they all under quarantine.

So many questions begging for answers. More digging to do.

Cindy

Luba
January 24th, 2008, 06:26 PM
This is a bloody miller I bet or broker. My email to public health was replied to. I requested they reconsider the picture they posted of the 'adult boxer' beside the rabies warning. It's very misleading, this dog wasn't even involved it's a general picture they use.

I hope they reconsider and put up some more appropriate photos on teh main page of puppies in question. the pups involved will now need to be in quarentine for 6mons. What a way to start a life, first with a jerkoff byb/miller and then sold at a flea market, then quarantined for 6mons. I wonder how many will end up with personality and behavioural issues 'now' along with any health problems.

happycats
January 24th, 2008, 07:14 PM
I watched the CTV news and they said the flea market booth had a "Pets R Us" sign posted on it.(everyone out ther reading this.....don't buy puppies from this sleeze ball!) they also said the guy selling puppies at that booth was handing out business cards, that said "feed me more pet's" l puppy brokers, with his name and #.

This should be outlawed!!! maybe because of this, they will finally pass a law that does not allow the sale of life animals (like meat or produce in a store) in flea markets!!
Maybe do something about the numerous puppy mills pumping out sick pups, it's about bloody well time that they stop treating pets like merchandise!!! And although no one seems to care where they come from, maybe now with the possibility of humans becoming infected with rabies, someone will finally pass some long awaited laws!

glitterless
January 24th, 2008, 08:46 PM
And if a puppy was raised properly in right conditions it should never normally have exposure to rabies, right?


No, not necessarily. I'm with everyone here... I doubt that the dogs were vaccinated against rabies, but it really is too soon to jump to conclusions. If the dogs go outside (which I hope that they did!), they can be exposed to rabies. Some areas don't usually have rabies. I'm surprised that there is rabies in S. Ontario at all right now. Isn't winter usually a slow time for rabies?

With the changes in the weather, I think we'll unfortunately see more and more cases of diseases like rabies because viruses can thrive year round in warm enough conditions.

I hope that this is brought under control quickly and that no other humans or animals were infected.

Luba
January 24th, 2008, 09:17 PM
I just heard that the guy had a sign up called

"FEED ME MORE"

I read another report similar to this one, from 2004 in the states regarding pups with rabies sold from a farm , skunk was the apparent culpret in that case. But they didn't find the skunk.
This is the story if you want to read it:
http://www.health.state.mn.us/news/pressrel/rabies092704.html



Here is more information on Rabies in general.

http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/public/program/pubhealth/rabies/qa/rabies_animals_qa.html








http://rabies.mnr.gov.on.ca/spectrasites/internet/rabies/history.cfm


Rabies is an infectious and contagious disease of the central nervous system. It has been known since the ancient days of 2300 B.C. This lethal virus still exists in almost all parts of the world.

Once infected, and left untreated, this disease is usually fatal. The rabies virus is concentrated in the saliva, mucus membranes and central nervous tissue of a rabid animal. Only humans, and other mammals, can become infected through a cut or scratch from an animal with rabies, or if the rabies virus comes in contact with the moist tissues of the mouth, nose or eyes.

There are two ways that rabies symptoms appear, dumb and furious. Both can cause abnormal behavior. Immediately prior to death, animals with furious rabies will appear to be ‘mad’: frothing at the mouth and biting anything that gets in their way. They may show extreme excitement and attack stationary things or animals. Bouts of furious rabies usually alternate with periods of depression.

In dumb rabies, there is no ‘mad’ period. With dumb rabies, paralysis, usually of the lower jaw, and a drooping head are the first sign of the disease. The paralysis quickly spreads to limbs and vital organs and death quickly follows. Animals with dumb rabies may become depressed and retreat to isolated places. Some may appear ‘tame’, having no fear of humans.

At one time, Ontario was known as the ‘Rabies Capital of North America’ due to the high number of rabid animals reported. Since 1992, the number of rabies cases has been reduced by 95% . In Ontario, rabies control programs focus on terrestrial rabies (Arctic fox strain and mid-Atlantic raccoon strain) while education programs focus on the various bat strains of rabies.

Arctic Fox Strain
This strain of rabies invaded southern Ontario, between 1954 and 1959, from northern Ontario and Quebec. In northern Ontario, the disease disappeared in 1972 but reappeared in 1989. It was eliminated from southeastern Ontario, but still persists in certain areas across southwestern Ontario.

Raccoon Strain
This strain of rabies (mid-Atlantic) was first reported in Florida in 1947, remained in the southeastern coastal parts of the USA until 1977, and then began to rapidly spread northward. It entered Ontario in July 1999. It was first discovered in a juvenile raccoon found dead in a dog kennel, just northwest of Prescott. To date (December 2005) 132 cases have been reported within this general area of Ontario. Wolfe Island near Kingston was held at six cases during December 1999 and has been rabies free for more than four years.

Bat Strain
These strains of rabies were first diagnosed in Ontario in 1961. There are eight species of bats in Ontario, all of which have their own strain of the disease, but the most common are Little Brown bat, Big Brown bat, and Silver-haired bat. Although bats are the most widely distributed mammal, less than 2% of bats submitted for testing have rabies (2% of all bats acting strangely, dead, or have possibly bitten a human or pet). In the overall population, this percentage would be much lower.

Role of the Ministry of Natural Resources in rabies management
The Ministry of Natural Resources has a department called the Rabies Research and Development Unit, whose role is to manage and research rabies in wildlife. They have focused on three means of controlling rabies: aerial vaccine baiting and TVR (trap-vaccinate-release) and controlling the disease at the point of infection when a new case is confirmed. Aerial vaccine baiting consists of dropping specially prepared vaccine baits from airplanes or helicopters in areas that have a high incidence of terrestrial rabies. The TVR program is used to immunize raccoons along international borders and in the rabies high-risk zone, in an attempt to prevent the disease from spreading or becoming established in Ontario. The MNR is also a leading agency in the research of this deadly disease. From studies of wildlife movement and genetics to vaccine and bait development, the MNR ensures that its programs are based on the best science available.

Luba
January 24th, 2008, 09:19 PM
Public Health update:

http://www.toronto.ca/health/pdf/rabies_update_jan_24_07.pdf

News Release January 24, 2008 Toronto Public Health expands rabies investigation Toronto Public Health is asking people who touched or purchased puppies at Booth # 1513 at Dr. Flea’s Flea Market since January 5 to call their local public health unit for assessment and advice. These puppies may have been exposed to rabies.

The flea market booth has a sign with the name “Pets R Us.” The vendor has also given out business cards with the name “Feed Me More Pets” and a business location of Chesley, Ontario. Anyone who has purchased puppies from this business at any location since January 3 should also contact their local public health unit. “Rabies is a rare and very serious condition that, left untreated, is most often fatal,” said Dr. Rosana Pellizzari, Associate Medical Officer of Health. “We have had close to 200 calls from the public so far and have been able to locate a number of the puppies sold at the flea market.” Toronto residents who may have been exposed to any puppies from this business should call Toronto Public Health at 416-338-7600 until 10:00 p.m. Thursday. The line will re-open at 8:30 a.m. Friday. York Region residents who may have been exposed to these puppies should call York Region Health Connection at 1-800-361-5653 until 8:00 p.m. Thursday. The line will re-open Friday morning. Peel Region residents should call 905-799-7700 until 10:00 p.m. Thursday or Friday during business hours. Residents who have come into contact with any animals purchased from this business at the flea market or any other location will be assessed and referred for medical treatment if required. Rabies vaccination is extremely effective in preventing illness if taken before symptoms occur. The vaccine is free of charge in Ontario. There have been no human cases of rabies associated with this investigation.

growler~GateKeeper
January 25th, 2008, 12:38 AM
Do they still do it through the gut? I hope it hurts. lol :evil:

If you meant Butt - yes that's where they stick it. :mwaha:


Rabies vaccination is extremely effective in preventing illness if taken before symptoms occur. The vaccine is free of charge in Ontario. There have been no human cases of rabies associated with this investigation.

I always find this interesting.........If a human comes in contact with the Rabies virus - vaccinate right away, human is fine. If an animal come in contact with the Rabies virus - they're quarantineed then pts - not vaccinated & are fine :frustrated: Why is the human vaccine so effective even after the fact but the animal one is not? :frustrated:

coppperbelle
January 25th, 2008, 06:32 AM
A few years ago my bil whose job it is to work with cow hides was called to pick up a dead cow. It had been killed by sometihng. Turned out whatever it was had rabies and since he may have come into contact with the virus he had to endure a series of vaccines.
They are no longer given in the stomach but in the arm or leg. Not sure about the butt.

In an unrelated story I heard on the news that a young girl iin the U.S. was diagnosed with the disease last week.

In Vermont last summer there were a number of cases of rabid raccoons found wandering in the city so neighboring New York state and southern Quebec dropped bait loaded with the vaccine.

happycats
January 25th, 2008, 07:06 AM
I just heard that the guy had a sign up called

"FEED ME MORE"




I heard it was "FEED ME MORE PETS" he was also handing out business cards, with this on it.

erykah1310
January 25th, 2008, 09:33 AM
Last summer or the summer before, my friend had called me about her moms barn cats acting strange. They displayed obvious signs of rabies ( in my eyes) so I told her to tell her mom to call around and tell people what was going on.
I believe it was MNR (ministry of natural resources) here that said. "It cant be rabies, there is no rabies around here"
Turns out all the cats died ( dont even get me started on this one, I know its a touchy subject but its what happened)

The point of this now... for those who are just not educated or even those who dont see animals the same way we do and see them more as working creatures as apposed to pets, how can they possibly change their views about the treatment of their farm animals if people such as MNR who are supposed to keep an eye out for stuff like this, dismiss it as nothing.

Iwas enraged that they didnt even tell her to have the cats tested, or encourage her to take them into a vet.
They just said, basically, that she was crazy and there was no way that the cats could have rabies as in our area there hasnt been a confirmed case in x amount of years.

Strangely enough a few weeks later there was a bat found in Espanolla ( a city 2 hours from here) who was positive for rabies.

14+kitties
January 25th, 2008, 10:23 AM
This site may answer questions about rabies shots and administration of them.

http://www.animalsheltering.org/resource_library/magazine_articles/sep_oct_2003/rabies_staying_vaccinated_and_informed.html

About 12 years ago or so my BIL, who owned a deadstock removal company, was called to pick up a horse who had been attacked by a rabid fox. The farmer didn't tell him it was rabid until AFTER it had been loaded onto the truck. By that time my bil had been exposed to umm... body fluids. He had to go through the full series of rabies shots which at that time was the navel area. Not into the stomach, but around the stomach cavity into the muscle. It was very painful for him. After that he asked every time he picked up an animal.

Luba
January 25th, 2008, 09:24 PM
I always find this interesting.........If a human comes in contact with the Rabies virus - vaccinate right away, human is fine. If an animal come in contact with the Rabies virus - they're quarantineed then pts - not vaccinated & are fine Why is the human vaccine so effective even after the fact but the animal one is not?

ME TOO! But I think we all know the answer to that one.

A friend of my aunts was bitten in her sleep by a rabid bat that entered the house through an open window a couple summers ago. She also rec'd the multiple injections.

I heard on the news that jerkoff from this place in question has been banned from keeping puppies on the premise. Well ya know he'll just move somewhere else now don't ya.

I wonder who he is, if he's been known as a miller before.


And well holy crap Toronto Public Health took the picture down of the boxer I was telling you about:

http://www.toronto.ca/health/

glitterless
January 26th, 2008, 12:12 AM
I don't think that animals are quarantined and then euthanized. They would only be euthanized if they actually had rabies or showed symptoms of it. Why spend the time and money on quarantine when the animal is going to be killed anyway? I think this is a misconception.

I have heard of entire farms being quarantined and that includes the humans on the farm. Rabies is very serious. I would call the MNR to investigate if I had reason to believe that a neighbour was irresponsibly handling rabies. It's not something to screw around with; especially if you have animals of your own. A rabies outbreak on a farm could mean losses in the thousands of dollars. I'm sure that there is some form of gov't compensation, but I'm sure it wouldn't be enough.

Growler -- I don't think that the human vaccine is more effective after the fact. Maybe someone can help me explain here, but I believe that some vaccines can actually be dangerous if given once an animal (human or otherwise) has already been infected with the virus. I think that in cases of a human coming into contact with the rabies virus, they are vaccinated as a precaution and that most people do not actually have the virus at this point. Based on how I believe that a vaccine works, I can't see how it would be of any help if the animal was already infected with the virus...someone please correct me or explain if I'm wrong.

An animal in quarantine still has to be handled and cared for. That means that that is at least ONE human life that will be at risk if the animal does in fact have rabies. Some people believe that it's better just to euthanize that animal and eliminate the risk, rather than wait and see.

I don't think that I could do that with any of my animals and that is precisely why I risk the side effects of vaccination and opt to vaccinate regularly for diseases like rabies.

Any more info on this case? Have other animals or any people contracted rabies?

growler~GateKeeper
January 26th, 2008, 02:27 AM
Glitterless please do not think I am attacking you or what you are saying, your response & questions are good ones & my responding to them is the easiest way for me to clarify what I meant :)

I don't think that animals are quarantined and then euthanized. They would only be euthanized if they actually had rabies or showed symptoms of it. Why spend the time and money on quarantine when the animal is going to be killed anyway? I think this is a misconception.

what I meant by that was the animal is quarantined & if showing signs then pts, but they wait & wait for signs - when first put in quarantined the animal is not vaccinated against Rabies as a precaution - which is what is done for humans exposed/potentially exposed the person is automatically vaccinated as a precaution, they don't wait & wait to see if they show signs then do something

Growler -- I don't think that the human vaccine is more effective after the fact. Maybe someone can help me explain here, but I believe that some vaccines can actually be dangerous if given once an animal (human or otherwise) has already been infected with the virus. I think that in cases of a human coming into contact with the rabies virus, they are vaccinated as a precaution and that most people do not actually have the virus at this point.

I get what your saying & yes some vaccines are dangerous to give once already exposed but the person who is potentially exposed is not tested or quarantined for rabies first before they administer the human vaccine - it's given automatically ~so is must be more effective right? ~ :shrug: very rarely do we hear of people potentially exposed or exposed (to a dead animal that had rabies), die from rabies after being given the human rabies vaccine

Maybe they are all just really lucky they didn't contract it :shrug: I don't know

Based on how I believe that a vaccine works, I can't see how it would be of any help if the animal was already infected with the virus...someone please correct me or explain if I'm wrong.

This is true but in most cases they don't know if the animal has already been exposed to the virus because the only test to prove rabies has to be done after the animal is dead. So why not vaccinate as a precaution.

My point is: if a person is suspected to have come in contact with the virus they are automatically vaccinated as a precaution

if an animal is suspected to have come in contact with the virus they are quarantined & watched

~why not just quarantine & watch people to see if they show signs? why do they get the vaccine right away?

~ why are animals not automatically vaccinated as a precaution against the virus like people are?

**my whole point of view on this probably stems from having more compassion for animals than people** :D

glitterless
January 26th, 2008, 05:48 AM
Thanks for clarifying, Growler :)

I quickly looked up some stuff.. it's on Wikipedia, so I can't guarantee the accuracy, but it seems that there is a difference between pre and post exposure vaccination. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabies

I hear you, Growler. It's unfortunate that animals don't receive the same treatment, although I can't see a vet refusing to vaccinate an animal that *may* have been exposed if the owner requested it. Maybe you're speaking of strays and wild animals.

Just out of curiosity, is anyone on here regularly vaccinated against rabies?

chico2
January 26th, 2008, 08:58 AM
I heard yesterday that the mother of the pups had been attacked by a skunk,maybe the pups were too young for vaccinations,but this could have been prevented,had the puppy-miller had the mom vaccinated,as required by law!!
I keep waiting for any news on an inspection of this mans operation,whether he is running a puppy-mill,this incident would be a good reason to shut this man down.
People dump there unwanted litters with him,but I am sure he also has his own breeding-business:yell:

Luba
January 26th, 2008, 03:33 PM
I think they're being tight lipped on the mill operation for a reason Anita.
I bet there were complaints about this jerk for a long time and nothing was done because under the current legislation nothing could have been done about the breeding.

I bet there were outdoor kennels or something. It's actually very odd for a skunk to be out in the really cold like this. They normally hide out for most of the winter living off body fat. So this skunk may have came out because it was sick?

I'm hoping that this event will be the stepping stone towards tougher legislation for breeding/mills/byb's. Maybe now would be a good time to start another petition since those who may not have signed it before, will now because of the rabies scare.

Luba
January 26th, 2008, 03:38 PM
Here is a link to the animal cruelty acts in Canada by province

http://cfhs.ca/law/provincial_legislation/



This is Ontario

http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca/html/statutes/english/elaws_statutes_90o36_e.htm


Standards of care for keeping cats or dogs for breeding or sale

15.1 (1) Every person who is engaged, employed or otherwise involved in the breeding of cats or dogs for sale and who owns or has custody or care of a cat or dog that is being kept for breeding purposes or for sale shall comply with the following standards with respect to every such cat or dog in the person’s ownership, custody or care:

1. Provide the animal with adequate food and water.

2. Provide the animal with adequate medical attention when the animal is sick or injured or in pain or suffering.

3. Provide the animal with adequate protection from the elements.

4. Transport the animal in such a way as to ensure its physical safety.

5. Not confine the animal to an enclosure,

i. with inadequate space,

ii. with unsanitary conditions,

iii. with inadequate ventilation,

iv. without providing the animal with an opportunity for exercise,

v. together with one or more other animals that may pose a danger to the animal, or

vi. that is in a state of disrepair or that is dangerous to the animal’s health or well-being. 2002, c. 27, s. 2.

Offence

(2) Every person who fails to comply with any standard of care listed in subsection (1) in respect of any one or more cat or dog is guilty of an offence. 2002, c. 27, s. 2.

Penalty – individuals

(3) Every individual who is guilty of an offence under subsection (2) is liable on conviction to a fine of not more than $60,000 or to imprisonment for a term of not more than two years, or to both. 2002, c. 27, s. 2.

Same, corporations

(4) Every corporation that is guilty of an offence under subsection (2) is liable on conviction to a fine of not more than $60,000. 2002, c. 27, s. 2.

Same, directors and officers

(5) Every director or officer of a corporation who authorized, permitted or participated in the commission of an offence by the corporation under subsection (2) is also guilty of the offence and on conviction is liable to a fine of not more than $60,000 or to imprisonment for a term of not more than two years, or to both, whether or not the corporation has been prosecuted or convicted. 2002, c. 27, s. 2.

Prohibition order

(6) If a person is convicted of an offence under subsection (2), the court making the conviction may, in addition to any other penalty, make an order prohibiting the convicted person or, if the convicted person is a corporation, the directors and officers of the corporation from engaging or being employed or otherwise involved in the breeding of cats or dogs for sale for any period of time specified in the order, including, in the case of an individual, for the remainder of the person’s life and, in the case of a corporation, forever. 2002, c. 27, s. 2.

14+kitties
January 26th, 2008, 03:49 PM
It's actually very odd for a skunk to be out in the really cold like this. They normally hide out for most of the winter living off body fat. So this skunk may have came out because it was sick?


Luba, it isn't really odd to see skunks every time of the year in OS area. I live there for 25 years and saw them all the time. In the winter time they lived closer to people's homes to get garbage when it was put out.

clm
January 26th, 2008, 04:04 PM
I see skunks here in winter, but like the possums, I only see them when it's above -10 at night. Colder than that and they don't come to the cat food dishes.
Like Luba, I make sure my outdoor cats and the dogs are vaccinated regularily for rabies. I know it's considered over doing it to have it done every year, but it's not a chance I want to take with such a lethal disease. The indoor girls are done every 2 years. I've only seen one skunk here in my 20+ years that I suspected was rabid. Animal control wouldn't even come out to see it. :frustrated: I saw it go under my neighbours shed and never saw it again, but it was noticibly ill. Staggering, making noises, and it was high noon in summer when it came ambling down my yard. I hustled the dog (yogi :rip:) in the house and kept an eye on it. It staggered and stumbled and finally got in it's den under the shed. It never looked at me or the dog, it just concentrated on trying to get to where it was going.
It's law in Ontario to have your dog or cat vaccinated. I've heard that the mother dog who killed the skunk had not been. That should be at least good for one fine to start with. Then she died and he sold off the litter. :frustrated: So not finding out if she was rabid when she died, knowing that she had killed a skunk, and then selling off the litter, should be at the very least an attempted manslaughter charge when dealing with such a lethal disease. If they want people to pay attention to how deadly this diease is and treat it seriously, then time to start making examples of people who don't vaccinate their pets against rabies.

Cindy

Luba
January 26th, 2008, 04:51 PM
We had a rabid skunk around our home many years ago, the poor thing couldn't stand up was falling all over drooling and very sick. Animal services came for it and I couldn't watch the rest of the story.

I occassionally, do see skunks in winter as well but not as often because they tend to stay underground or where they habitat during the cold. I guess the OS skunks aren't fattening up enough pre winter LOL ? Have no clue.

I read on the MNR site that rabies tends to be higher in the fall and winter months, but I haven't read why that is. I wonder if it's because of an incubation period.


There were rabies cases in MT this year too:
Last Updated Wed, 2 January 2008 06:25:42 PM

http://www.ckxtv.com/news_story.php?id=12441&Picture=0



Over the past three weeks, two cases of rabies, a viral disease that affects central nervous system has been confirmed in skunks in the southwest part of the city near marquis crescent.

Veterinarian Wayne Clayton says,

“Even though skunks normally hibernate during the winter months, if they’ve got rabies they can be out any time of year.”

Doctor Clayton says rabies is transmitted through saliva primarily through bite wounds, it can also be spread if infected saliva enters an open cut or wound, but residents don’t seem too concerned.

“We smelled a skunk in the area, but we never saw anything of it,” said one person.

“We have a fenced yard and we keep our dog on a leash so, if you’re dog runs free I guess there’s a chance of that but not really,”added a woman who lives in the area.

The Brandon Police Service is saying it’s not a huge problem at this point but they’re advising citizens to be cautious anyway.

“If you’re out walking or if you’re out with your pets just be aware not to approach any skunk not that you would anyway but if they see any skunks or any wild animals, just stay clear of these animals,” said Sgt. Larry Yanick.

Doctor Clayton says it’s quite easy to tell if an animal does have rabies because most of the signs relate to the effect of the virus on the brain.”

“They might be really aggressive and a few hours later they might be quite dumb and vise versa, so any animal that’s acting unusual…could be rabies,” says Doctor Clayton.

We’ve never had a case of human rabies in Manitoba according to Doctor Clayton, and says he’d like to keep it that way, and one way to keep it that way is to vaccinate you pets.

Luba
January 26th, 2008, 04:59 PM
Here are some Canadian Rabies Stats for those interested:

http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/im/vpd-mev/rabies-eng.php




During the past 6 years (2000-2005) a total of 2,238 cases of confirmed animal rabies were reported in Canada (average: 373 per year).

Skunks accounted for 40% of the total cases, followed by bats (26%), foxes (11%) and raccoons (8%). Bat rabies was detected in most regions across Canada, except the three territories and Prince Edward Island (PEI).

Three provinces accounted for the majority of cases: Ontario (43%), Manitoba (24%) and Saskatchewan (14%).

The species most affected, by region, during the 6-year period were as follows: skunks in Manitoba (434/540 or 80%) and Saskatchewan (243/316 or 77%); bats in British Columbia (91/95 or 96%), Alberta (20/21 or 95%) and Quebec (66/118 or 56%); foxes in the Northwest Territories/Nunavut (57/74 or 77%) and Newfoundland/Labrador (33/44 or 75%); and raccoons in New Brunswick (55/70 or 79%).

In Ontario the most affected species were bats (356/956 or 37%) and skunks (226/ 956 or 24%). Over the past 6 years, PEI reported one case of animal rabies (cat), and Nova Scotia reported three. Yukon had no reported cases of animal rabies. Spread to domestic species of animals, such as pets (e.g., cats and dogs) and livestock (horses and cows) has occurred. Dogs and cats accounted for 4.5% of animal rabies cases.

Bat rabies has accounted for 58% of the human rabies cases in the United States since 1980 and appears to be increasing in frequency. The increased incidence is due, in part, to the failure to recognize the small wound inflicted by a biting bat and thus omission of post-exposure prophylaxis. In most of the recently reported cases, there has not been a history of a bat bite although there has been contact, either recognized or unrecognized at the onset of the illness, with infected colonies. In the past, four cases were thought to have been acquired through aerosolized virus across mucous membranes.

chico2
January 26th, 2008, 05:02 PM
I have skunks,possums and raccoons in the summer,but wintertime I only see raccoons.
I did at one time see a rabid raccoon(did not know at the time he had rabies)outside the restaurant where I worked,he was stumbling around,a very sad thing to see and ended up just laying in the parkinglot,
The police got there faster than HS and they shot the poor thing.
Luba,I am hoping they are investigating this jerk and putting a stop to his wholesale of puppies:fingerscr

Luba
January 26th, 2008, 05:10 PM
It's sad isn't it to see them like that. I won't be watching Cujo the movie for a little while.

I read on the MNR site that rabies tends to be higher in the fall and winter months, but I haven't read why that is. I wonder if it's because of an incubation period.

In responding to my own question above, I just read that the incubation period can be up to a year. So I wonder why they are only keeping the pups in quarantine for 6mons then? They may do cerebral spinal fluid testing on the pups to see if they've been exposed to the virus perhaps?

Luba
January 26th, 2008, 05:12 PM
I"m sure there will be media pressure now Anita and people are going to be very upset over this as many people are having to undergo rabies vaccines over the next several weeks. NOt something I would want to do.

One news program did a good piece on breeders and such, telling people not to buy from flea markets and pet stores :thumbs up

chico2
January 26th, 2008, 05:33 PM
Yes,I saw that too,I believe it was on CTV,the Toronto Channel.
Hopefully she got through to some people.

growler~GateKeeper
January 27th, 2008, 01:10 AM
I quickly looked up some stuff.. it's on Wikipedia, so I can't guarantee the accuracy, but it seems that there is a difference between pre and post exposure vaccination. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabies

I hear you, Growler. It's unfortunate that animals don't receive the same treatment, although I can't see a vet refusing to vaccinate an animal that *may* have been exposed if the owner requested it. Maybe you're speaking of strays and wild animals.

From that article it sounds like there is only post exposure vaccine for humans not for animals :frustrated: In that section it only refers to "the patient" does not say the cat or the dog etc. I guess that is why they don't vaccinate animals as a precaution because there isn't one :shrug:

I was meaning all animals not just strays and wild ones

I guess if there is no animal post-exposure vaccine the standard pre-exposure one would either not be effective or may kill them if they are already infected :shrug:

A question to ask the vet next time ;)

I just read that the incubation period can be up to a year. So I wonder why they are only keeping the pups in quarantine for 6mons then? They may do cerebral spinal fluid testing on the pups to see if they've been exposed to the virus perhaps?

The quarantine would be only 6 months probably because that would be the approx timeframe for the virus to travel through the little puppy bodies :sad:

from above posted wiki article link
the virus must travel from the site of infection through the peripheral nervous system (nerves in the body) before infecting the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and glands to cause lethal damage

They can't effectively do cerebral spinal fluid testing because by the time the virus hit the spinal fluid the dog/cat/animal would be dead within minutes - I don't think they can safely or effectively test any other nerves? :shrug:

Luba
January 27th, 2008, 01:16 AM
They can't effectively do cerebral spinal fluid testing because by the time the virus hit the spinal fluid the dog/cat/animal would be dead within minutes - I don't think they can safely or effectively test any other nerves?

This is something I'm intrigued to find more out about and I'll post my finders keepers lol here for all to see if I get anything good! :thumbs up

growler~GateKeeper
January 27th, 2008, 01:39 AM
The only test I know of that is conclusive for rabies is testing the brain after the animal is dead so I don't think there is any other way :fingerscr they find one soon

Luba
January 27th, 2008, 01:57 AM
This is a really really good detailed article if anyone wants to read it (humans)

http://jcm.asm.org/cgi/content/full/36/4/1117


Most of the conventional techniques used for postmortem analysis of the brain are of limited value to support the intravitam diagnosis of rabies (9, 37, 61). We reviewed records of 39 cases of intravitam diagnosis of rabies in the United States during the period 1960 to 1996 (3, 10-27) and of 16 cases of intravitam diagnosis performed in France during the period 1970 to 1997 (Table 3). This confirms that the corneal smear first developed with mice by Schneider (54) was too insensitive for accurate clinical diagnosis (3, 4, 44, 62). The only test that has demonstrated reliable results is the immunofluorescence (IF) test on skin biopsy samples (62). In our study, the IF test (33), performed on frozen sections of the skin biopsy samples, exhibited the highest sensitivity (sensitivity, 0.86; n = 7). It detected the presence of rabies virus very early in the course of the disease and could be considered one of the most important tests for intravitam diagnosis


The average delay between the onset of clinical symptoms and the collection of specimens that confirmed the presence of rabies virus was 6.7 days


http://www.cdc.gov/rabies/diagnosis.html

Rabies diagnosis in animals
The direct fluorescent antibody test (dFA) is the test most frequently used to diagnose rabies. This test requires brain tissue from animals suspected of being rabid. The test can only be performed post-mortem (after the animal is dead).



Rabies diagnosis in humans
Several tests are necessary to diagnose rabies ante-mortem (before death) in humans; no single test is sufficient. Tests are performed on samples of saliva, serum, spinal fluid, and skin biopsies of hair follicles at the nape of the neck. Saliva can be tested by virus isolation or reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Serum and spinal fluid are tested for antibodies to rabies virus. Skin biopsy specimens are examined for rabies antigen in the cutaneous nerves at the base of hair follicles




Okay well my question is, if they can do these tests on humans why not on animals? Is it because it's easier to euthanize the animal and do the brain tissue test?

growler~GateKeeper
January 27th, 2008, 02:10 AM
Probably :frustrated: they just take the easy way out. I guess they figure the risk that an animal is already exposed is much greater than a human since more animals have died from rabies than people that just supports the easy way out theory.

I wonder though how effective the antibody or antigen testing is on animals - since in endemic areas all animals are supposed to be vaccinated against Rabies - therefore they would have the antibodies already present. Same with puppies to young to vaccinate, they should have some of mother's antibodies present - not enough to fight off the virus but perhaps enough to show on the testing.


But like I mentioned in previous post - if the antibodies are already present in the spinal fluid it would only take minutes to the brain :shrug: how effective is that test then on people too?

Luba
January 27th, 2008, 03:14 AM
Yes they should have the antibodies present 'if' they were given the vaccines. Having said that millers are notorious for producing fraudulent documents and often may only vaccinate a couple of the adult dogs. After all, you've seen the condition a lot of mill dogs are in right. What miller would take a sick and neglected mill dog (adult) to a vet for a rabies vaccine in that state and risk being caught.

Rabies is really one of the only vaccines I do support. Let's just hope the current strains that are active don't mutate. :pray:

BTW I always thought the name 'growler' was very cool. :thumbs up

growler~GateKeeper
January 27th, 2008, 03:45 AM
Of course, but those developing/producing vaccines are not thinking of millers etc, they are thinking in terms of nomal people who vaccinate

*sigh* so many questions not enough answers

BTW I always thought the name 'growler' was very cool. :thumbs up

thanks! :) my :rip::dog: Cally (Dal x Lab) was a growly boy :D - he'd growl @ when someone walked over him, when you told him to get off the couch, when he wanted to get someone's attention - it was who he was :lovestruck:

:shrug: seemed to fit for a username :D

glitterless
January 27th, 2008, 06:02 AM
Same with puppies to young to vaccinate, they should have some of mother's antibodies present - not enough to fight off the virus but perhaps enough to show on the testing.


I thought that if the mother was vaccinated at the right time, the puppies would be safe until they are due for their shots or even some time well after that.

I don't know much about dog breeding, but I know that with livestock, we have certain windows in which the animal needs to be vaccinated for this or that in order for her baby to be protected.

growler~GateKeeper
January 27th, 2008, 06:33 AM
I think they might be safe enough if not in direct contact with the virus, but I could be wrong :D, because the mother dog is not (to my limited knowledge of breeding practises) revaccinated when she becomes pregnant that years' vaccine is only given @ the usual time.

For example even with the mother dog being vaccinated against Parvo - some puppies will still get it prior to or even after their first puppy shot @ 8 wks & if the virus is severe most will not make it. The vaccines take time to work @ building antibodies in the blood, this is why they stagger the puppy boosters over a 3 wk timeframe.

It all depends on the level of antibodies against the virus in the blood - I wouldn't want to depend on the level of maternal antibodies against something like rabies - which is why everyone in endemic areas are required to have yearly rabies vaccines, but us in non-endemic areas can get the 3 year vx.

Luba
January 27th, 2008, 04:54 PM
Or perhaps it depends on the strain of rabies involved.

clm
February 6th, 2008, 09:42 PM
It is a law in Ontario. It should be a law anywhere that there is rabies.

Cindy

chico2
February 7th, 2008, 07:47 AM
It certainly is a law in Ontario,I believe probably all of Canada.
If China passed a NEW law,it's probably the one and only good thing they've done for animals and people too for that matter...oops I am straying:laughing:

hazelrunpack
February 7th, 2008, 08:51 AM
Doctor Clayton says it’s quite easy to tell if an animal does have rabies because most of the signs relate to the effect of the virus on the brain.

Just a word of caution. Don't bet your life on this. Around here, anyway, red foxes and skunks can look and act perfectly healthy and still carry latent rabies. This may also be true for raccoons.