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How often should a cat poop ?

Masha
January 20th, 2008, 03:28 PM
Hi,

A few months ago I switched my cat to grain-free wellness canned food and he is enjoying it and eating regularly. But since the switch he started to poop every other day. Before the switch, when he was on dry food, he would go every day. Is this normal? My guess is that this is because he has less "waste" as there are no grain in his diet..... :shrug:

Is it normal for a cat to poop every other day or should it be every day?

krdahmer
January 20th, 2008, 11:43 PM
Yep that sounds pretty normal. As long as he isn't straining, and there isn't any blood or anything else out of the ordinary, every other day is fine. And you are probably right, he is getting more nutrition and less 'filler'.

growler~GateKeeper
January 20th, 2008, 11:47 PM
Yup sounds normal, also depends on the amount of food the cat is eating. Higher quality food = less eaten = less waste = less poop. Just look out for the things krdahmer has mentioned.

Masha
January 21st, 2008, 05:52 PM
I haven't noticed any other changes, other than the frequency....oh, and the monthly hit on the bank account :rolleyes:

Thanks for your feedback!

wolfcat
January 29th, 2008, 06:37 AM
Wellness is a great pet food and worth it.

We've had experiences with other foods and some supposedly reputable foods (I wont mention names to protect the guilty) led to previous cats developing kidney problems that were fatal in two cases (different foods) and painful crystals in another. The latter cost over $2,000 in surgery/vet visits.

A good lesson for all of us is to look at what pet food compainies fell victim to the 'pet food poisoning' debacle of a year ago and which very few pet foods were unaffected.

Read the packaging and the ingredients, talk to a vet, then make the best informed decision you can make.

Like us, filler crap is .... er,.... well - crap. :D

Animals need high protein diets and to eat a little and often, as they would in nature.

(Rider: unless they have a specific, diagnosed medical condition)