Pets.ca - Pet forum for dogs cats and humans 

-->

Help! Cat suddenly has weak hind legs - X-Rays not showing Anything wrong

Breeee123
January 16th, 2008, 03:16 PM
Hi,

I just noticed late last night that my cat was having a hard time pulling her hind quarters up into a standing position, and she seems to have a difficult time walking or jumping. She'll walk a couple feet and then sit down to rest, and she's extremely reluctant to get up again. I took her to the Emergency clinic last night and they checked her pulse in her hind legs to make sure it wasn't a blood clot, and she had a strong pulse in both hind legs. They took X-rays, which showed no damage that would explain the limping. They basically just gave her a shot for the pain and said to watch her for a few days and bring her back in if the symptoms persist. This morning she was the same.

She's an indoor cat, so I doubt if there was any serious trauma. She's 10 years old and has always been in fantastic shape - always energetic and running around the house. This is the first time I've ever had a medical problem with her.

She did have a dental appointment a week ago, and they gave her anasthesia. I called my normal vet and asked them if it could have been the anasthesia, and they said probably not because it's been a week. They also did a routine blood test right before the dental, and they said everything came back normal and her glucose levels were fine so it's not diabetes.

Any help would be very much appreciated! :cry:

Thanks,

Briana

SARAH
January 16th, 2008, 04:02 PM
Sounds strange. I would still think of the anesthesia even if it's been a week, could be a delayed reaction to the nerves or something, - I'm totally guessing here, have no idea - I think I'd take her back to your regular vet if there is no change by tomorrow. 10 years isn't old for a cat.

Love4himies
January 18th, 2008, 07:16 AM
Did they check her for possible blood clots? How about any heart issues? Ask your vet if anything unusual happened during the procedure. Here is a link that I found about a cat who seems to have the same reaction as your cat:

http://www.vetinfo4cats.com/canesthesia.html#Effects%20of%20anesthesia%20and%2 0problems%20recovering

Remy21
February 10th, 2008, 10:58 PM
Hi,

Have you figured out anything new since you posted? My cat is having the exact same problem. He is only 10 months old and he has been healthy until the last week. At first I thought he was just imbalanced because he seemed to be swaying when he walked, he tipped over if I pet him, he tried to jump up on the table, missed, and fell on his back, etc. I thought maybe it was an inner ear problem so I brought him to the vet as soon as I noticed the problem.

The doctors at the clinic were stumped as they could not figure out what was wrong with him. They tested his glucose levels and said he doesn't have diabetes which oftentimes causes a cat's hind legs to be weak. They took x-rays and there were no bony abnormalities. He also did not have a heart murmur, his lungs were fine, and she checked out his ears, nose, and mouth which all looked fine. She said the pieces weren't fitting together and they just didn't know what was wrong with him. She said the next step would be to do a blood workup.

Right when I got home from the vet I placed my cat in his litter box because he'd been gone for a few hours and I figured he'd need to use it. After I put him in the litter box he started eating the kitty litter! He was eating mouthfulls. I pulled him out of there and put him by his food dish and he just went right back to the cat box and started to eat the litter.

The next morning I found out online that clumping cat litter contains something called sodium bentonite, and when ingested it causes cats to be weak and lethargic. For sure I thought this must be what was wrong with him. Then I started to wonder if he's sick because he's eating his cat litter or he's eating his cat litter because he's sick.

I went to the store and got the Cat's Pride brand of litter which states on the container it contains no sodium bentonite and is able to be flushed down the toilet. I read somewhere online that since sodium bentonite clogs pipes, imagine what it does to your kitty's intestines.

As soon as I filled the litter box with the new litter, my cat proceeded to eat the litter again. Since it didn't contain the sodium bentonite I wasn't AS worried, but I decided to go back to the store and get the Feline Pine brand, which is supposed to be completely safe and 100% pine, so it's okay if they ingest it, and it's able to be flushed down the toilet, etc. I haven't put the new litter in the box yet but I plan on doing so tonight.

I've read online that cats might eat their litter because they are lacking something in their diet. One source I found said that cats might eat their cat litter if they are calcium deficient or if they are anemic. I haven't had the blood test done yet so I don't know if it's either of these things. Another thing I read is that being anemic is probably caused by an underlying issue. I'm really hoping there isn't a serious problem with my kitty. I've only had him 6 months and he and my dog are best friends. I would be devastated.

I wasn't able to call the vet today and tell them about him eating his litter because they are closed. I left a message for the vet to call me back so I will be able to talk to her tomorrow.

One more thing I want to add that sounds completely crazy is that when we moved into this house 6 months ago, for some reason there was a small cinder block sitting on the floor in between the washer and dryer and nobody picked it up. I'm not sure why we just left it there but my boyfriend noticed, I'm not sure how long ago it started, that our cat was licking the cinder block. I'm wondering if maybe he does have some sort of deficiency and his eating the litter and licking the cinder block were giving him something he needs. We just threw the block outside recently and soon after is when he got sick. I'm not sure if he just started eating the kitty litter right after we threw the block outside but I've never noticed him doing it in the past. I have no idea if that makes any sense but I don't want to completely throw out that detail in case there's something important about it. I haven't told the vet about this yet because I feel kind of stupid saying I let my cat lick this cinder block for who knows long and didn't bother to throw it out.

Briana, have you ever noticed your cat eating litter? Even though his legs seem weak does he still seem alert and like everything is functioning properly except his legs, or does he appear sick overall?

Sorry this was so long but I wanted to give you as much information as possible. Maybe we can help each other along and let each other know if we find anything else out. Is there anything else you can share about your cat that might be helpful? Any similarities to my story?

Thanks!

Love4himies
February 11th, 2008, 07:42 AM
I have never heard of adult cats eating litter before. Here is a link to a story that seems similar to yours:

http://www.manhattancats.com/Articles/PICA.htm

Remy21
February 11th, 2008, 08:15 AM
Hmm, thanks for the info. I'll be sure to ask the vet about that. I left a message for the vet to call me today. They open at 8. I wish they would call me right away!

Briana, my cat sounds exactly like yours. He's having trouble pulling his hind legs up into a stance position and he'll only walk a little distance before sitting down to rest. He's also having trouble staying upright while walking; he's tipping over. Also a hard time getting into his cat box. Basically when he walks he looks like he's drunk, very wobbly (I don't think he has gotten into anything that could have poisoned him though, except for maybe eating the litter, if that is poisonous).

I don't think I mentioned this before but he's still urinating in his cat box, but he won't deficate in it. He's doing that on the floor next to the cat box. I think it's because his legs are weak and he's having trouble squatting so he does it on the floor where it's easier for him. When he urinates he squats a different way so he's still able to do that in the cat box.

I switched his litter to Feline Pine. He was hesitant to go in there and seemed scared of the pine pellets, so I put a layer of Cat's Pride (the kind without sodium bentonite) over the Feline Pine, and he urinated in the box, so when he covered it up he mixed the two litters together. Maybe in a couple days I can empty it out and fill it completely with Feline Pine (supposed to be 100% pine, natural, safe).

I feel so bad for him and I don't know what to do!

growler~GateKeeper
February 12th, 2008, 01:26 AM
Take him in for a full blood panel & a urinalysis......honestly this should have been done before the vet did the xrays.

You need to have the vet keep a close eye on the hemocrit/PCV - Packed Cell Volume on the blood test - this will determine the amount of red blood cells your cat is producing, if not enough the cat is suffering from anemia.

Anemia will show signs of weakness in the legs esp the back legs as well as the spine, pale gums, litter eating & concrete licking among other symptoms

Another cause of litter eating is mineral esp iron or calcium deficiencies: http://www.pets.ca/forum/showpost.php?p=236713&postcount=16

A fecal test should also be done to determine if there are any parasites such as tapeworm that could be causing anemia

Remy21
February 12th, 2008, 08:03 AM
I was really, really convinced before I went back in yesterday that he was either anemic and/or he had a calcium deficiency. His blood work was all normal. The globulin was slightly elevated but she didn't seem worried about it.

They have absolutely no idea what's wrong with my cat. They've done x-rays, glucose test, complete blood workup, and a fecal exam.

Either he's worse this morning or he's having more trouble because he just woke up, but he can barely walk. He falls down every few seconds and has a hard time getting up.

For the last 2 days he's also been deficating while he's lying on his side after he falls down. I'm not sure if this means anything but he's done this a couple times. He's no longer doing it in his litter box. He just randonly does it while he's lying on the floor after he falls down.

I have no idea what to do.

Is it safe to give my cat Methyl B12 even though the vet said he's not diabetic? Should I have the glucose test re-done? His glucose was 92 when they tested it the first time.

sugarcatmom
February 12th, 2008, 08:26 AM
Is it safe to give my cat Methyl B12 even though the vet said he's not diabetic? Should I have the glucose test re-done? His glucose was 92 when they tested it the first time.

Methyl B12 is very safe and any excess just gets peed out, but it probably won't have any effect in your case. By the time a diabetic cat shows signs of neuropathy, you'll also be seeing other signs of diabetes like excessive drinking and peeing, ravenous appetite, weight loss. Since his glucose tested normal and (I'm assuming) there aren't any other signs, I really doubt you're dealing with neuropathy. Is it possible he got into some kind of toxin? Maybe there's a nerve problem that wouldn't show up on x-rays? I have no idea how you'd find out. The only other suggestion I have is to try accupuncture or talk to a veterinary chiropractor about what's going on.

Remy21
February 12th, 2008, 08:43 AM
No, he doesn't have any other signs of diabetes. He actually hasn't urinated since Sunday. He has been drinking water though. Usually when they have a UTI, they urinate, or try to, a lot instead of not at all, correct? He hasn't used his litter box at all since Sunday and when he does go in there, he just eats the litter out of the box.

The vet I was seeing actually said she didn't think the leg weakness and the litter eating were related. I don't see why they wouldn't be if they both started at the same time. It's just really odd that I read online that concrete licking and litter eating are signs of anemia and/or calcium deficiency, but she told me he doesn't have either of those.

Does anyone think it might be helpful to get a urine test? She said his kidneys were fine from the blood test. The urine test is another $50. I've spent $270 already and I know nothing...

Remy21
February 12th, 2008, 09:21 AM
Does anyone know anything about FIP (feline infectious peritonitis)? Like I said his globulin was elevated and I researched elevated globulin and came up with FIP. I read on a couple different websites that a symptom of noneffusive (dry) FIP is neurological changes such as weak hind legs. The disease is also known to start showing signs when their younger, or really old.

I really hope this isn't what my kitty has. I don't have any other cats and he's an indoors cat, but I adopted him from a shelter where he was around other kittens.

SnowDancer
February 12th, 2008, 12:00 PM
Personally, I would want to see a neuro, but I warn you that the cost will be very high. Hope your kitty gets better.

Love4himies
February 12th, 2008, 02:43 PM
I would be seeing a different vet immediately. Not urinating for days can be life threatening. Have they done an ultrasound on his kidneys. Not all stones will show up on an xray.

sugarcatmom
February 12th, 2008, 03:55 PM
Hmmmm.....weak hind end, not urinating, and eating cat litter can sometimes be symptoms of acute kidney failure. Are you sure he hasn't gone pee somewhere else? I'd be taking him to emergency if he truly hasn't urinated since Sunday.

growler~GateKeeper
February 13th, 2008, 12:16 AM
To test for FeLk, FIV & FIP there is a snap test called the ELISa (Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant assay) test this will test for all three & can be done in-clinic.

I was also wondering about nerve damage. A neurological exam by a specialist will define which part of the nerve system has been affected.

Remy21
February 13th, 2008, 01:03 PM
I saw a second vet and he also suspects FIP/FIV/FeLV. He didn't mention the ELISA test... just testing individually. Also I think the test for FIP is really expensive, and it isn't 100% accurate either. He mentioned doing 2 tests... serum electro-something. He said it would see specifically which immunoglobulins are elevated. Also he wanted to do a blood smear. He's going to wait for me to call back if I want to do either of those. I think for now I'll just wait to see if the new diet and removing the clay kitty litter helps.

He thinks it's either that or possibly he was poisoned (maybe by the cat litter?). I will just have to wait 3 to 4 weeks to see if he gets better, and if he doesn't, it's probably one of the viruses.

He also mentioned testing for Lyme disease, but he didn't make it out to be a big concern. I read online that Lyme disease in cats can cause sudden lameless. My kitty was born in the springtime and whoever had him before had him outside sometimes. Anyone know anything about that?

Love4himies
February 13th, 2008, 01:11 PM
Here is a brief description of Lyme's disease symptoms:

Lyme disease in cats is rare, though cases have been reported. In a limited study, one third of feline blood samples were found to test positive for Lyme disease. It is probable that some cats are able to resist the illness.

Of reported cases, symptoms exhibited were: pain and stiffness in limbs and joints, lameness, fever, loss of appetite, fatigue, possible sudden collapse, a "zombie-like" trance and in cases of heavy infestation, severe anemia. Most cases are diagnosed because the owner has actually found a tick; otherwise symptoms tend to be ambiguous or other illnesses are suspected.

I know in dogs and cats it is treated with an antibiotic Doxycycline (sp?), not sure about cats.

Remy21
February 13th, 2008, 01:16 PM
Thanks. Hmm, I guess that doesn't sound too likely. I wonder if maybe I should see if I can give my cat an antibiotic even though we don't know what's wrong. His WBC count was 7,500 which isn't high, but maybe just in case? Couldn't hurt... right?

Love4himies
February 13th, 2008, 02:21 PM
I wouldn't give any meds without a vet approval. Some may not be good for cats and different antibiotics target different bacteria.

Remy21
February 13th, 2008, 03:31 PM
I meant I wonder whether or not I should ask the vet about giving him an antibiotic even though we don't know what's wrong with him.

Remy21
February 13th, 2008, 04:42 PM
I'm not sure that my cat actually ate any tinsel, but I'm trying to think of anything he could have eaten. We still have a pile of stuff from Christmas in the living room (I live with my boyfriend and his brother, and their mom brought it over, we never used it). I didn't know there was any tinsel but my boyfriend's brother told me there was.

Can tinsel actually be poisonous to cats, or is it only dangerous because it could get caught in their intestines?

badger
February 13th, 2008, 05:09 PM
How's your cat today? Any improvement?

Remy21
February 14th, 2008, 09:51 AM
His walking hasn't improved, but he seems more sociable. Is that a good sign?

He slept in bed with my boyfriend and I the last two nights and before that, ever since he became sick, he slept by himself in his crate.

Also during the day he has been coming into my office with me where I work and sleeping on the couch instead of in the crate. Usually he just hides out all day and right now he's sleeping behind me on the couch, side by side with my dog, instead of hiding. A little encouraging, I guess.

I wish Briana would check this forum and let me know what happened with her cat. Is there any way to get ahold of people of these forums?

Remy21
February 14th, 2008, 09:52 AM
Could it just simply be "nerve damage?" How do you treat something like that? Or does it just get better?

Remy21
February 14th, 2008, 10:11 AM
I was just rubbing my cat's back and legs, and I noticed that when I squeeze his back right at the base of his tail, his feet and toes "jump." Also I was feeling the muscle right behind his legs, and there is a certain spot on both sides that makes his tail twitch. He's not doing it voluntarily. When I squeeze these areas his feet/toes/tail consistently twitch and jerk. I'm not sure if it's a nerve thing. Does anyone think this is worth telling the vet?

Remy21
February 14th, 2008, 01:43 PM
For anyone who has been following me and my cat, what about an injury to the tail??????

I read online that symptoms can include lameness in the legs, urinary/fecal incontinence (he has fecal incontinence - he has been going on the floor, usually he falls down and then goes on the floor), and a drooping tail. I put him on the floor to watch his tail and he does keep it down towards the floor when he walks, but when he stretched, he lifted his tail up high.

On Superbowl Sunday, two Sundays ago, my cat fell off the table in the kitchen and landed on the floor, not on his feet. I just assumed this was the beginning of his weakness, because we actually noticed there was a real "problem" the following Thursday. Maybe when he fell he injured his tail????

It wouldn't explain his elevated glob at 5.6 (2.8-5.3 normal) and slightly elevated TP at 8.9 (5.7-8.9 normal), but they are only slight elevations. Maybe they don't mean anything at all?

I am starting to feel optimistic. Maybe I'm just in denial, but it's possible, right?? I should have the doctor look at his x-rays again. Or maybe if the injury is minor you wouldn't be able to see it on x-rays, but it could still affect the way he walks.

growler~GateKeeper
February 15th, 2008, 01:59 AM
I was also wondering about nerve damage. A neurological exam by a specialist will define which part of the nerve system has been affected.

Could it just simply be "nerve damage?" How do you treat something like that? Or does it just get better?

Nerve damage will most likely not get better on it's own, it would need to be treated by a neurological specialist - which they do have for cats & dogs.

I was just rubbing my cat's back and legs, and I noticed that when I squeeze his back right at the base of his tail, his feet and toes "jump." Also I was feeling the muscle right behind his legs, and there is a certain spot on both sides that makes his tail twitch. He's not doing it voluntarily. When I squeeze these areas his feet/toes/tail consistently twitch and jerk. I'm not sure if it's a nerve thing. Does anyone think this is worth telling the vet?

Since you don't know what you are dealing with everything is worth telling the vet, even better to bring him in & show them, they would better be able to tell from seeing his reactions.

:2cents: I think you should get the FIP test done to determine if that is what this is or rule it out. A diagnoses sooner is better than later since you would have more time to treat. If the FIP test comes back negative then I would recommend seeing a neurologist. :2cents:

Remy21
February 18th, 2008, 10:25 AM
:2cents: I think you should get the FIP test done to determine if that is what this is or rule it out. A diagnoses sooner is better than later since you would have more time to treat. If the FIP test comes back negative then I would recommend seeing a neurologist. :2cents:[/QUOTE]

There isn't just one definite FIP test though and all of this really confuses me. I have heard of the ELISA test and that might be something that tests for all the viruses (FIV, FeLV, FIP...?) I'm not sure about that though.

Otherwise I've read that it's impossible to actually "diagnose" FIP until the autopsy after death. :(

I'm not sure which tests I should be doing and if they are really worthwhile. If I do have to bring him to a neurologist I'm not sure how much that will cost and I don't know if I'll be able to afford it.

My cat is still the same. He hasn't gotten any better or any worse in the last week. He can't walk right so all he wants to do is lie down and rest or hide away somewhere, but otherwise he looks healthy. He's still eating and drinking. He's never had a fever when I brought him in to see the doctor. He's still urinating in his litter box but not defecating. Every single time he defecates he falls over onto the floor and he would go while lying on his side if I didn't hold him up everytime. :( I really don't know if I should just be waiting at this point or doing something. :(

I wish Briana would come back on here and let us know what happened with her cat...

growler~GateKeeper
February 19th, 2008, 12:36 AM
There isn't just one definite FIP test though and all of this really confuses me. I have heard of the ELISA test and that might be something that tests for all the viruses (FIV, FeLV, FIP...?) I'm not sure about that though.

Yes the ELISA test does test for more than just FIP, this way you can rule out the others @ the same time.

Otherwise I've read that it's impossible to actually "diagnose" FIP until the autopsy after death. :(

uhh I think you must be thinking of Rabies, that is the only virus that cannot be tested for until after death.

FIP is a coronavirus (similar in nature to the Corona and Parvo viruses that dogs get) & testing will give a definative diagnosis.
from http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/brochures/fip.html
Are there any laboratory tests that can detect the FIP virus?
The KELA, ELISA, IFA, and virus-neutralization tests detect the presence of coronavirus antibodies in a cat. A positive test result only means the cat has had a prior exposure to a coronavirus -- not necessarily one that causes FIP -- and has developed antibodies against that virus. If the test is negative, it means the cat has not been exposed to a coronavirus.

The number, or titer, that is reported is the highest serum dilution that still produced a positive reaction. Low titers indicate a small amount of coronavirus antibodies in the serum, while high titers indicate greater amounts of antibodies. A healthy cat with a high titer is not necessarily more likely to develop FIP or be a carrier of an FIP-causing coronavirus than a cat with a low titer. It also is not necessarily protected against future FIP virus infection.

Recently, two new tests have been developed that can detect parts of the virus itself. The immunoperoxidase test can diagnose FIP more accurately than traditional histopathologic examination because it detects virus-infected cells in the tissue. A biopsy of affected tissue is necessary for evaluation. Another antigen test utilizes polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect viral genetic material in tissue or body fluid. Although this test shows promise, PCR is presently only capable of detecting coronaviruses in general, not necessarily those that cause FIP.

A FIP test would be much cheaper than seeing a neurologist & will put one possibility out of your mind before moving on to the next.

zsvoboda
February 19th, 2008, 02:37 AM
Hello from Prague, Czech Republic. We have been fighting with exactly the same symptoms of my cat (7 months old male) for past two weeks. The cat can't walk, he is pulling his rear legs. No fever, he eats the cat litter sand, hiding away and he is very drowsy. We tried everything, antibiotics (quite a few of them), corticoids, steroids with no results whatsoever. He is not getting better or worse. The vet did the ELISA FIP test which turned positive. I do not trust this test. We have one more cat that had similar problems the vet did the same FIP test and recommended euthanasia. We did not do it, the cat healed and haven't had any problems since then (>2.5 years). Recently we have found that cat had ascarides worms (to our surprise as we use the Stronghold regularly and he does not have access outside of our apartment). I had quite an argument with the vet as he was diagnosing the FIP from the test only (the cat has no other usual FIP symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea, fever etc.). The vet also said that this might be a blod block or neurological issue combined with the worms (ascarides). I'll keep you updated regarding our progress.

sugarcatmom
February 19th, 2008, 07:52 AM
uhh I think you must be thinking of Rabies, that is the only virus that cannot be tested for until after death.

FIP is a coronavirus (similar in nature to the Corona and Parvo viruses that dogs get) & testing will give a definative diagnosis.


Actually, Remy21 is right about how difficult it is to test for FIP. You see, FIP is a mutation of the coronavirus, which many 'normal' cats have anyway, so the presence of FCoV antibodies is not a definitive diagnosis. Here's some more info from a leader in FIP research: http://www.dr-addie.com/WhatIsFIP.htm#Diagnosis%20of%20FIP

Diagnosis of FIP this section is intended for veterinary surgeons
FIP is a notoriously difficult condition to diagnose, many other conditions present with very similar clinical signs. Definitive diagnosis is only possible at post mortem, or occasionally by biopsy (though for accurate biopsy results one has to actually biopsy a visible pyogranulomatous lesion, which may necessitate laparotomy). Only 18% of samples sent to our laboratory for FIP diagnosis turn out to be FIP. Since cats with FIP are usually euthanased, it is absolutely vital that FIP is accurately differentiated from other, treatable, conditions.

In our laboratory at the University of Glasgow, we offer an FIP profile which confirms or rules out a diagnosis of FIP in over 90% of cases. The FIP profile consists of four parts: a feline coronavirus (FCoV) antibody titre, albumin:globulin (A:G) ratio on the effusion or plasma, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) level and cytology or haematology.

Note: many healthy cats and cats with diseases other than FIP have FCoV antibodies. The presence of FCoV antibodies alone is NOT diagnostic of FIP, if the other parameters of the profile do not indicate a diagnosis of FIP.

Remy21
February 19th, 2008, 08:22 AM
Yes, like sugarcatmom said, I've read that the FIP test may read positive but it might only mean they are carrying the coronavirus and many (something like 30% of household cats? correct me if I'm wrong) healthy cats carry the virus without ever becoming sick.


zsvoboda - When did you find out your cat had worms? I had a fecal test done on my cat which apparently ruled out all parasities (except tapeworms, she said), so does that mean my cat most likely does not have ascarides (I'm not sure what that is - a type of worm?) Does anybody know?

My cat quit eating the litter because I changed it to the Feline Pine, but we still have this little cement brick that he likes to lick and we gave it back to him (after throwing it out previously) because he likes it so much. I think it makes him feel better.

zsvoboda PLEASE keep me updated. This morning I am thinking my cat may be a little worse. He's walking worse and I noticed when he was sitting at his water bowl he was rocking back and forth. I'm scared that he will need to be euthanised if he gets any worse. :cry:

Remy21
February 19th, 2008, 08:23 AM
sugarcatmom - Do you know how to figure out the albumin to globulin ratio? His globulin was 5.6 and albumin was 3.3. I've read that if the "A:G ratio" is less than 0.6 (or some sources say 0.8) that it is another indicator of FIP.

Do you just divide 5.6 / 3.3 or how does that work?

Remy21
February 19th, 2008, 08:26 AM
The vet did the ELISA FIP test which turned positive.


The ELISA test tests more than just FIP, so are you saying it was positive for FIP or just positive overall?

This is all so confusing. I just want my kitty to get better.

sugarcatmom
February 19th, 2008, 02:15 PM
sugarcatmom - Do you know how to figure out the albumin to globulin ratio? His globulin was 5.6 and albumin was 3.3. I've read that if the "A:G ratio" is less than 0.6 (or some sources say 0.8) that it is another indicator of FIP.

Do you just divide 5.6 / 3.3 or how does that work?

Don't take my word for it, but I think you would divide the albumin by the globulin, so 3.3/5.6 = 0.589

Remy21
February 19th, 2008, 02:24 PM
Don't take my word for it, but I think you would divide the albumin by the globulin, so 3.3/5.6 = 0.589

Yes... that does make more sense since it is A:G ratio and not G:A ratio.... crap. :cry:

I read this somewhere:

Serum Protein Levels. If the total serum protein is 7.8 g/dL or greater AND the A:G ratio (ratio of two different blood proteins) is less than 0.6, FIP becomes a more likely diagnosis. A few other diseases may also cause this, but these are also very severe and usually fatal. These findings occur in 50% of the cases of FIP.

His TP is 8.9. :cry:

I don't give up though. I'm still not convinced it's FIP. Does anyone know if having a parasite could affect a cat's TP, albumin and/or globulin?

zsvoboda
February 19th, 2008, 11:58 PM
The FIP test doesn't say anything. According to studies 90% of cats that have access to outside and 30% of cats that live at home have been exposed to some form of coronavirus (in most cases NOT the FIP mutation) thus are "FIP" positive according to the ELISA test. If the test is negative it also does not mean anything as it does not detect the coronaviruses during their incubation period. The test has only one meaningful outcome. If it is negative, vets usually perform the more precise PCR test. If the PCR is positive than it again does not mean anything (just presence of some form of the virus, no one can say if it is the FIP form or not). If the PCR test is negative, your cat is the rock star with no coronavirus. Because of the above vets in UK stopped using the ELISA test as it is quite useless.

Our cat was positive to general coronavirus. Nobody can tell if it is FIP or one of the many other forms (which causes no serious issues).

If your cat licks the brick or eats the cat litter you should double check the parasites! This is the direction that we are now following as we have detected the worms (ascaris is one of the most frequent roundworm). Unfortunately all the misleading treatment that the cat has received in past two weeks (ATB, corticoids, steroids etc.) plus the worms (roundworms excrement many toxic stuff when they are dying) lead to issues with his liver and he started turning yellow yesterday (this is unfortunately very serious). Our only hope is that all his issues were caused by the worms and when they are gone, he'll start doing better. It seemed to me that he was a bit more agile today morning but it might be a false hope. I'll keep you posted.

Remy21
February 27th, 2008, 01:55 PM
Ok, I need some advice...

If you haven't read this whole thread, all of a sudden my cat's hind legs became weak on Feb. 7th. Then he started eating his cat litter. I changed the litter to Feline Pine and he quit. He was lethargic, seemed depressed, hid away, and was eating less, but still eating. He was still urinating in his cat box but would not deficate in it, seemed like he couldn't control it. I've been following him around and when he had to poop (he would always fall on the floor first, that was my cue) I would always carry him to the litterbox and hold him up.

He had a negative glucose test, negative x-rays, and his blood work showed slightly elevated globulin at 5.6 and slightly elevated total protein at 8.9. Finally the doctor talked to someone down at the University of Minnesota who suspected FIP.

I brought him to another doctor and he also was suspicious of FIP. Since there are no tests to definitively "diagnose" FIP, he suggested serum electrophoresis and possible a titer test. I decided to wait and see if he got better or worse.

Now today, a couple hours ago, I went to pet him on the couch and he smelled like urine. He peed all over himself. Then I put him on the floor to clean him up with wet paper towels and he all of a sudden got diarrhea (first time he's had diarrhea since he became sick) and he went all over the carpet and finally onto a towel after I hurried and got that under him.

I called the doctor and he said he thinks it's time to put him to sleep. I asked him if he thought I should get the serum test incase he thinks it might be ANYTHING besides FIP. He said it could always be something besides FIP, but at this point whatever it is is probably really bad.

If it were any of you, would you be worrying that it might be "something else" and be hesitant to have him put to sleep? After I cleaned him up he crawled (he can barely stand up anymore) to the little dog/cat carrier I have on the floor and he's been lying in there. His face and eyes still look alert and that's what kills me. I don't know how I could have him put to sleep when he's still looking at me like that.

Anyone have any advice? What would you do if it was your cat?

Remy21
February 27th, 2008, 01:58 PM
By the way I am tentatively scheduled to have him euthanized tonight between 4:30-6:00pm so a prompt response would be appreciated. Say anything, really, I just want to know what you all think.... thanks.

bendyfoot
February 27th, 2008, 02:07 PM
I think you're the only one who can make that hard decision...you know your kitty better than anyone else on the planet, and if you feel he still has a pretty good quality of life and is getting enjoyment out of things despite the mobility impairment and incontinence (which is the case for many, many pets who suffer from paralysis or other similar conditions), then maybe it's not time just yet. However, if you don't think the quality of life is there, then maybe it is time. It's a horrible decision to make, but you probably know the right decision in your heart of hearts. hugs to you.

RUSTYcat
February 27th, 2008, 02:21 PM
If I were faced with this situation now...and, having been in two similar dilemmas in the recent past...and, still having distress over the decisions I made in both cases, I would today do whatever was available to me to ensure that I had no choice but to make that ultimate decision.

I would have the tests done.

sugarcatmom
February 27th, 2008, 02:26 PM
Oh my gosh, that's so hard. I'm not sure if anyone can tell you what to do in this case. I had to euthanize my beloved kitty, Egypt, about 3 years ago after a month of struggling to save him. He had IBD, which wouldn't normally be fatal, but it's possible there was something else going on as well. He became incontinent, was projectile vomiting and had explosive diarrhea. The day I that I knew that he'd been through enough, there was just something in his eyes, a pleading desperation to make it all stop, and I couldn't get him to the vet fast enough. I certainly don't regret trying all that I did for that month, but I also wish his last day was more peaceful and not filled with my frantic hysteria.

I wish you peace and love in this extremely difficult time. Here's a link that talks about quality of life, maybe something in there can help with your decision: http://72.14.253.104/search?q=cache:TCD9v5ug414J:www.homevet.com/petcare/documents/quality.pdf+alice+villalobos+quality+of+life&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=3&gl=ca

krdahmer
February 27th, 2008, 05:05 PM
:sad:I am praying for you both. :pray::grouphug:

phoozles
February 27th, 2008, 06:18 PM
It's always tough to make that decision - you have to do what is right for you, and for your kitty. We're here for you no matter what happens. :grouphug:

Remy21
February 29th, 2008, 10:11 AM
Thanks for all the support everyone. We had him euthanized on Feb. 27 at 6:00pm. It was really hard to do and I stayed with him through the entire thing but deep down I knew he wasn't going to get any better. I don't think he was in pain yet but I didn't want him to be in any either. I'm really going to miss him. :cat:

sugarcatmom
February 29th, 2008, 01:22 PM
Thanks for all the support everyone. We had him euthanized on Feb. 27 at 6:00pm. It was really hard to do and I stayed with him through the entire thing but deep down I knew he wasn't going to get any better. I don't think he was in pain yet but I didn't want him to be in any either. I'm really going to miss him. :cat:

My condolences on your loss. It's such an incredibly painful decision to make, but you did a very brave and loving thing. :candle:

Deda Brada
March 5th, 2008, 03:04 AM
Hi,

I just noticed late last night that my cat was having a hard time pulling her hind quarters up into a standing position, and she seems to have a difficult time walking or jumping. She'll walk a couple feet and then sit down to rest, and she's extremely reluctant to get up again. I took her to the Emergency clinic last night and they checked her pulse in her hind legs to make sure it wasn't a blood clot, and she had a strong pulse in both hind legs. They took X-rays, which showed no damage that would explain the limping. They basically just gave her a shot for the pain and said to watch her for a few days and bring her back in if the symptoms persist. This morning she was the same.

She's an indoor cat, so I doubt if there was any serious trauma. She's 10 years old and has always been in fantastic shape - always energetic and running around the house. This is the first time I've ever had a medical problem with her.

She did have a dental appointment a week ago, and they gave her anasthesia. I called my normal vet and asked them if it could have been the anasthesia, and they said probably not because it's been a week. They also did a routine blood test right before the dental, and they said everything came back normal and her glucose levels were fine so it's not diabetes.

Any help would be very much appreciated! :cry:

Thanks,

Briana

Hi Briana!

Many years ago I read a letter from one cat lover whose young male (I still remember his name, it is Tazz) had the same problem and, after all, it was discovered that he had FIP (Feline Infectious Peritonitis)! It was of so-called dry form so Tazz managed to survive! But, if your cat is strictly indoor, it is hard to believe that she acquired that virus. Maybe it's worth checking your cat for the presence of retro-viruses? I really hope her disease is not so horrible.

Many regards from Deda Brada.

Deda Brada
March 5th, 2008, 03:06 AM
Hi Briana!

Many years ago I read a letter from one cat lover whose young male (I still remember his name, it is Tazz) had the same problem and, after all, it was discovered that he had FIP (Feline Infectious Peritonitis)! It was of so-called dry form so Tazz managed to survive! But, if your cat is strictly indoor, it is hard to believe that she acquired that virus. Maybe it's worth checking your cat for the presence of retro-viruses? I really hope her disease is not so horrible.

Many regards from Deda Brada.

jmbarshack
May 18th, 2008, 02:20 AM
Thanks for all the support everyone. We had him euthanized on Feb. 27 at 6:00pm. It was really hard to do and I stayed with him through the entire thing but deep down I knew he wasn't going to get any better. I don't think he was in pain yet but I didn't want him to be in any either. I'm really going to miss him. :cat:

I've just joined, after reading through this whole thread. I was initially interested in this topic and found this thread through google, because I was searching for answers and information to better understand and help resolve the rear leg weakness for my kitty Spot, 15 years old.

Remy 21, I just wanted to tell you that I greatly admire how well you cared for your kitty and how hard you tried to help him get better. And though it was so hard, you did the right thing to let him go. I really empathize. I had to let my 12 year old pug dog Tish (companion for Tucker) go last October, after battling rear paralysis for about three weeks.

You are a truly great cat parent, and there are so many kitties out there in the world who need good homes. I hope you will, when the right time comes, adopt another cat so s/he can have all the love you have to give. Bittersweet kudos to you.

plmgifford
June 26th, 2008, 03:39 PM
This started about two days ago that I noticed. Sam is an 8 year old - and very fat - 24lb - cat. A few weeks ago, one of my other cats was coughing - either asthma or acute bronchitis. Treated, but also stool sample revealed roundworms - so all three treated for roundworms. A week ago Monday, they all received their 2nd dose of roundworm treatment. This past Monday, I noticed Sam didn't really want to get up from the couch. Tuesday I noticed the same thing, but when he did get up, his hind legs are wobbly and they just don't seem to be working properly.

Took him to the vet yesterday. Xrays normal, CBC came back normal. No signs of infection, no diabetes. She's instructed me to keep a close eye on him, try to get a urine sample over the next week. Also, if he doesn't get better, more blood work to see if perhaps a clot.

I just had to put my 11 year old Simon to sleep in April after a 2 week stay in 24 hour care that cost me $5800 just to find out he had liver cancer and needed to be put to sleep.

Can anyone please offer some help with what might be going on with my Sam?

Thanks

bambi1980
August 13th, 2008, 02:32 PM
Thanks for all the support everyone. We had him euthanized on Feb. 27 at 6:00pm. It was really hard to do and I stayed with him through the entire thing but deep down I knew he wasn't going to get any better. I don't think he was in pain yet but I didn't want him to be in any either. I'm really going to miss him. :cat:

I found your post when i search in google "my cats back legs are weak" I read your whole post...My heart goes out to you. *hugs and i would like to say Thank You for the post.

On a personal side I'm 23 weeks pregnant and my cat (patches aka patcho). 6 years of age has started showing the samething, however not eating kitty litter. My boyfriend was spinning the cat on the wood floor Tuesday morning and nothing seemed to be wrong <-- inmature for 32.
Yesterday i noticed he's limping with his back left and front right. Patches is a indoor cat as well I've check all this paws for anything that might be sticking him, an nothing. Patcho is eating and drinking.
I only noticed it today that Pacho was having a hard time standing and limp's when moving around. He rather sit then stand. I'm going to give it until Friday and if he doesnt get any better im going to take him in...I've been off work for over two months due to this pregnancy and the money isnt there for me to ba able to take him in....Why is it always like this.

RUSTYcat
August 13th, 2008, 03:19 PM
...My boyfriend was spinning the cat on the wood floor last friday and nothing seemed to be wrong <-- inmature for 32...

Welcome to Pets.ca!.

I have to say, I urge you to put an end to that. Cats are not toys nor are they like dogs. One might play with a dog like that...I say "might" if the dog was interactive with the human and if it were gentle "play"...sorry, though, inappropriate for cats who are far more "delicate" and more easily injured...and, such behaviour may very well lead to agressive behaviour on the part of the cat.

I hope this was not the cause of the symptoms you are seeing.

Please book the appointment. Hopefully, a simple consultation will take care of everything.

I'll give you one caution - if the Veterinarian prescribes the drug Metacam (http://www.metacamkills.com) politely refuse and request an alternative. Click on the drug name to find out why.

RUSTYcat
August 13th, 2008, 03:51 PM
...He's limping with his back left and front right....
I only noticed it today that Pacho was having a hard time standing and limp's when moving around. He rather sit then stand...

With this kind of behaviour, it is usually recommended that the cat be confined to one small comfortable area without anything that can be used as a "perch" and where both food, water and litter are easily available without climbing.

Love4himies
August 14th, 2008, 08:32 AM
Welcome to Pets.ca!.


I'll give you one caution - if the Veterinarian prescribes the drug Metacam (http://www.metacamkills.com) politely refuse and request an alternative. Click on the drug name to find out why.

:eek: Thanks for letting us know, I hear so much about it being used on dogs, I probably wouldn't have thought twice about using it on cats.

badger
August 14th, 2008, 08:57 AM
Bambi, I'd take your cat in today. Nothing about what you describe is normal. Please don't wait until Friday.
And no spinning :eek:

bambi1980
August 14th, 2008, 06:43 PM
Welcome to Pets.ca!.

I have to say, I urge you to put an end to that. Cats are not toys nor are they like dogs. One might play with a dog like that...I say "might" if the dog was interactive with the human and if it were gentle "play"...sorry, though, inappropriate for cats who are far more "delicate" and more easily injured...and, such behaviour may very well lead to agressive behaviour on the part of the cat.

I hope this was not the cause of the symptoms you are seeing.

Please book the appointment. Hopefully, a simple consultation will take care of everything.

I'll give you one caution - if the Veterinarian prescribes the drug Metacam (http://www.metacamkills.com) politely refuse and request an alternative. Click on the drug name to find out why.

Oh dont worry i blasted him for doing it...

bambi1980
August 14th, 2008, 06:45 PM
With this kind of behaviour, it is usually recommended that the cat be confined to one small comfortable area without anything that can be used as a "perch" and where both food, water and litter are easily available without climbing.

Yes i've already done that. Might i also add i use to work at a vet office a few years back. You know how you go to the gym and your always sore not the next day but on the 2nd? i think this is what has happend. However if it doesnt improve i will take Patches in.

bambi1980
August 14th, 2008, 06:48 PM
Bambi, I'd take your cat in today. Nothing about what you describe is normal. Please don't wait until Friday.
And no spinning :eek:


I'd love to take him in however i dont have the cash until tomorrow. i moved about two months ago and this new place doesn't have a payment option. You just have to pay in full once leaving. Normally i have money, i work for the biggest communications company in North America. However have had to take some time off work due to complications with this pregnancy

bambi1980
August 14th, 2008, 06:50 PM
His walking has improved slightly...but not back to normal

bambi1980
August 15th, 2008, 08:14 AM
Well this morning jhe walking way better. Still not 100% however its a huge improvement from the other two days.

ryebread
August 20th, 2008, 07:27 PM
Unfortunately, my cat has been showing the same symptoms for the last two weeks. He's only about 10 months old. :(

We have two indoor cats of the same age (came from the same litter). The cats have never been outside from birth. They have all their shots, etc. and are very well maintained.

One has always been a bit clumsy -- missing jumps, sometimes misstepping, etc.. Two weeks ago he started walking slowly. He'd go 2-3 steps and then stop. He wouldn't jump onto things.

The next day he was declined through the day. By the end of the day he could hardly walk. He fell when he walked. He walked with his rear elevated and his front legs trembled. He sat for extended periods of time in his litter.

We took him on an emergency trip to the vet the next day. The vet has actually been terrific and has done several examinations, rounds of testing, calling the local university vet school, etc..

The blood work came back with everything within normal range. The only thing near the edge of a normal range was his white blood cell count, which was on the high side of normal. The vet suspects this is a result of trauma.

Like the original poster said, the x-rays came back negative. There were no signs of breaks or anything abnormal.

There are no signs of FIP and no real chance that he could have been poisoned (plus he's never vomited the entire time we've had him). He's never been outside so it'd be hard to contract anything related to a flea or tick.

For the first few days, the cat was on a pain killer and we had him isolated. He actually improved drastically on his own and returned to about 85% of his ability to walk and run on a flat surface. He still couldn't really jump and was slow on the stairs, but he was much improved though his front legs still had tremors. We felt that he could have had a happy life if he just plateaued at this state.

Yesterday he took a turn for the worse. He was again walking slowly and started to look as if he was in pain. He spent most of the day in his bed. He didn't want his back touched. By the end of the evening, he was walking weirdly and was falling again.

We called the vet again first thing this morning. Our cat is still a medical mystery. We're being referred to the neurology department at the local university.

If anyone has had a similar experience and actually found a positive resolution, please let me know. It's tearing us up to watch him in this state.

Thanks in advance!

RUSTYcat
August 20th, 2008, 07:52 PM
ryebread-

Welcome to the forum!

If you read through this entire thread, perhaps you noticed my post above...

I'll give you one caution - if the Veterinarian prescribes the drug Metacam (http://www.metacamkills.com/) politely refuse and request an alternative. Click on the drug name to find out why.

You mentioned you were given a drug for pain - unfortunately, Metacam is becoming a drug of choice for pain relief, it appears, and many cats are very muh the worse for it.

The nearby university...is that a Veterinary school? If so, you are very fortunate. Please keep us updated.

ryebread
August 21st, 2008, 12:19 AM
Rusty: Thanks for the head's up. Out vet has given us Buprenex for pain medication.

You're correct -- the university nearby has one of the USA's premier veterinary medicine programs. We're extremely fortunate. Now, if only we can afford it. ;) :)

RUSTYcat
August 21st, 2008, 07:55 PM
ryebread-
Check your PMs

ryebread
August 25th, 2008, 02:19 PM
We're scheduled for September 10th, but they're trying to work our cat in earlier. He seems to improve slightly if we put him in isolated rest, but he's obviously not nearly as happy as when he has free reign on the house.

Does anyone else have familiarity with these types of cases?

acky
August 26th, 2008, 11:31 AM
I have to admit we have had cats that we spun on the floor before. As long as you are not overly rough, I don't think it causes harm in a healthy cat. Just a quick point I wanted to make though. If you ever wonder if your cat is anemic, the characteristic sign is that all of the areas that are normally pink, lose their pink color. Depending on the cat they may not have any pink areas but if they do - gums, tongue, the little vein in their claws, their ears, their belly, anyplace that is normally pink is less pink or completely white. that is from the loss of red blood cells. My cat is anemic and thank goodness, her gums are a light color and I can check them for pinkness to keep tabs on her. Her brother is solid grey everywhere so the only place to check on him is his tongue. He isn't anemic so thank goodness I don't have to do that because he doesn't care to have his mouth messed with.

JennyD
October 21st, 2008, 10:54 AM
Hello,

I read this thread after searching on Google. Two nights ago, my cat "Radley" displayed the same trouble. She is 7 years old and has also always been an indoor cat, but she suddenly had trouble walking and the Vet and I are puzzled. I initially thought she had gotten hurt somehow, but the vet observed her all day yesterday and said she is displaying what he called "Shifting Lameness" which is unusual and her x-rays came out normal.

She did go to the Vet 2-3 months ago because she was having allergies, and the Vet gave her a steroid shot. The Vet said Diabetes was a possible side effect of that shot, and I am wondering if this may be a result of that as well. I am supposed to get the lab results on her blood and neurological tests today. I would appreciate if some of these posters with similar problems could keep posting with whatever they find, and I will do the same.

Thank you!
Jenny

Duchess08
October 21st, 2008, 12:28 PM
Hi,

I just noticed late last night that my cat was having a hard time pulling her hind quarters up into a standing position, and she seems to have a difficult time walking or jumping. She'll walk a couple feet and then sit down to rest, and she's extremely reluctant to get up again. I took her to the Emergency clinic last night and they checked her pulse in her hind legs to make sure it wasn't a blood clot, and she had a strong pulse in both hind legs. They took X-rays, which showed no damage that would explain the limping. They basically just gave her a shot for the pain and said to watch her for a few days and bring her back in if the symptoms persist. This morning she was the same.

She's an indoor cat, so I doubt if there was any serious trauma. She's 10 years old and has always been in fantastic shape - always energetic and running around the house. This is the first time I've ever had a medical problem with her.

She did have a dental appointment a week ago, and they gave her anasthesia. I called my normal vet and asked them if it could have been the anasthesia, and they said probably not because it's been a week. They also did a routine blood test right before the dental, and they said everything came back normal and her glucose levels were fine so it's not diabetes.

Any help would be very much appreciated! :cry:

Thanks,

Briana

My sisters persian had that happen, he died of heart problems... hope that is not it.

JennyD
October 22nd, 2008, 10:13 AM
We received most of the lab results which were negative for any viruses. The only notable results were an elevated white blood cell count and I guess something that indicated muscle inflammation. We are still waiting for some of the labs to come back ( I believe they are related to neurological tests).

Radley seems to be progressing in spite of the fact that we have not really treated her. I am just trying to keep her active by playing with her and trying to get her to stand up and walk around. She is able to stand and walk for longer distances, but still needs some help. She is also jumping up and down from furniture again, even though she is a little awkward/ off-balance when she does. She has still not been drinking much and has not gone to the litterbox as much as she used to.

We may take her back to the Vet again tomorrow for further observation.

JennyD
November 15th, 2008, 04:03 PM
Well, we have given it some time and it looks as though our kitty has fully recovered!

The Vet never found the cause to her trouble walking, but he did find low levels of Potassium and Vitamin B, and gave her a vitamin shot on her last visit. He also wondered if the low white blood counts could have been due to an infection of some kind. So he prescribed Marbofloxin to treat the possible infection and Mirtazapine to stimulate her appetite, since she had managed to lose some weight.

Radley is back to her old self, running around and jumping on things. We still are not sure what may have been the cause of her trouble, but we are thankful that she has recovered.

-JennyD

CaptainOlimar
November 15th, 2008, 04:09 PM
Wow, now that's good news! I'm glad for you and Radley. :highfive:

Love4himies
November 15th, 2008, 04:20 PM
Thanks for the update JennyD, glad to here she made a full recovery. Sure would love to see some pics of Radley :lovestruck:

PeanutEmmaEli
December 2nd, 2008, 11:04 AM
My 3 1/2 year old indoor cat suddenly appeared with a limp leg last night. We took her to the emergency vet and nothing came up on the xray. The vet said it may be nerve damage. She is very lethargic today and I found her laying in her litter box this morning. She doesn't seem to be in pain, but she is just laying there, seemingly helpless. I hate seeing her this way. The only thing that has changed was her kitty litter. I normally use feline pine pellets. I ran out and had a box of the clumping feline pine leftover in the basement. I used it once, but it made a mess so I haven't used it since. I don't know if this has anything to do with it, but I am letting the vet know anyway. The emergency vet said if it doesn't get better we may have to consider amputating. There is no way we could afford that, and Peanut is having a hard time not being able to use her arm too.

Blastasaurus
December 18th, 2008, 10:18 AM
Hey there guys, i've got the same problem with one of my cats. Mr Burns, or Burnsy, White Boy, Little Man or the Monster. He's one of three cats in our household but the only one with a problem.

He's a 10 month old, white domestic. Positive he's got some Balinese in him. He is usually very active, inquizative and extremely affectionate but over the last few weeks has become less and less like himself. At first he just seemed a little clumsy and arkward. We thought not much of it. He started urinating outside of his litter box which was right out of character. We were told that he was trying to mark his terratory. When he started falling short when jumping to tables and chairs we became a little concerned. His hinde legs were noticably weak. He was wobely. He looked uncomfortable whether sitting or walking. As we'd just started letting him outside we checked him over for any wounds or obvious injuries on his legs or belly. We couldn't see anything so hoped it was a passing sickness or he was simply growing into a clumsy cat.

Then, a few days ago he urinated while sleeping next to us in bed so we knew something was up. I mean, his "accidents" had become more frequent but it was only apparent now that he had no control over it. In the morning we took him straight to the vet. The vet found he had a minor urinary infection and gave him a shot of anti-biotics. He suggested the problem with his hinde legs maybe nerve related and caused by the inflamation caused by the infection. He told us the anti-boitics would kick-in in about 6 hours and to keep an eye on his walking. If he hadn't regained his agility within a couple of days then he should be brought back for x-rays.

The shot seemed to clear up the urinating problem but nothing else. That afternoon he seemed even more unsettled, uncomfortable and unsocial. He complained and would shy away when he was picked up. Later that night he was in too much pain to be handled so it was back to the vets this morning for the x-rays. 2 x-rays and countless tests later and they can find nothing wrong. They put him on a painkiller/anti-inflamatory (Metacam) and said if that didn't work then it may be a neurological problem. He came home as fragile as ever and still a little sedated from the x-rays. I know we've got a great vet but i knew they were a little stumped. Seeing my once vibrant and affectionate cat rapidly deteriorating with still no idea of what was wrong scared the hell out of me. I Googled every symptom i could think of and found out some pretty interesting things.

Unlike dogs, cats actually have quite a varied nutritional requirement. It's quite common for cats to have a calcium deficiency due to all-meat diets and to have Vitamin B1 (Thaimin) deficiency caused by cooking their food. Both these dificiencies have the exact symptoms mentioned all through this thread. I tried to supplement their dinner tonight with some watered down milk and some Vegemite on toast. It was the only Calcium/Thaimin rich foods i could to interest this usually ferocious eater. A dramatic improvement immediately. It may have just been the anti-inflamatories taking effect but he sprang back to life as soon as he finished cleaning a glob of Vegemite off his paw. He changed from a cripple back to a kitten. Sprawling over family members. Playing with the other cats.

The Metacam wears off in a few days so i'll be able to see if it's the drugs or the diet. It is probably a bit of everything we've done over the last few days but it's important to be aware of the need for a rich and varied diet. Kitty Milk is full of calcium and thaimin so it shouldn't be hard to supplement thier diet. We'd been feeding the cats nothing but tined tuna, mince meat and the ocassional pre-packaged cat food. Feeding cats the same food over and over magnifies the deficiencies in a diet and that's where we may have gone wrong with young Burnsy. Only time will tell and it's too early to tell yet. Atleast he seems content tonight. Even if there's more to his problem, i'm sure my new appretiation for his nutritional needs will benifit him so much in the years to come.

*i'm typing fast than i'm thinking. Hope that all made sense. It's late here and i can't be bothered with spell check

RUSTYcat
December 18th, 2008, 10:38 AM
Blastasaurus - Welcome to the forum.

First off.........has this cat been fed Orijen dry cat food?

sugarcatmom
December 18th, 2008, 12:02 PM
We'd been feeding the cats nothing but tined tuna, mince meat and the ocassional pre-packaged cat food.

Hi, and welcome to pets.ca! I'm hoping your kitty makes a full recovery, and good for you for looking more into his nutrition. I gotta say, that's a terribly unbalanced diet you're feeding. It's not that cats need a great variety in their food, but they do need properly balanced nutrients, particularly where the calcium/phosphorus ratio is concerned. A diet of canned tuna and ground meat is awfully lacking in calcium and should make up no more than 10% of your kitties meal portions. Please either feed a quality commercial canned food (dry isn't good for cats), or consider doing some more research into what it takes to make a homemade diet. I wouldn't feed tuna anymore either: http://catnutrition.wordpress.com/2007/09/22/eight-strikes-against-fishy-feeding-for-cats/

Here is a good site for more info on feline nutrition: http://www.catinfo.org/

I'll let RUSTYcat deal with the Orijen issue.

RUSTYcat
December 18th, 2008, 10:48 PM
Blastasaurus- It's midnight here on the Canadian east coast, so I may miss your reply to the Orijen question.

If it should be that the cat has had any amount of Orijen dry cat food, I know that you will need to go to the (Australian) CatWorld forum and get yourself up to speed on some serious health issues occurring there in cats who have used that food. The current discussion thread is here (http://www.cat-world.com.au/forums/index.php?showtopic=89088).

ryebread
December 19th, 2008, 10:49 AM
I wanted to provide a follow up on my previous post regarding my cat as there may be some hope and direction for other pet owners out there. Since my original post, we spent quite a bit of time trying to figure out what was wrong with our cat.

Our pet would cycle up and down. He'd seem to be improving for about a week or two and then he'd crash hard and revert back to some of his bad symptoms. Specifically he was extremely weak, had tremors, stiff limbs, and weird body twitching, was defecating on the mat in front of the litter box, refused to roll onto his back either for play or attention (which had previously been his favorite), was very withdrawn and often could not climb the stairs without stopping to rest. His weirdest symptom was that he felt like he didn't really have muscle in his limbs, but instead just had floating bones. He could be maneuvered into weird body positions without any sort of natural resistance. He cycled up and down several times over the course of two months and we'd exhausted the resources of the vet we use for primary care.

After a particularly bad cycle, we decided to "call in the big guns" and take him to the local veterinary teaching hospital in the last week of October. We're lucky enough to live next to one of the top 2-3 in the US so we felt like we'd at least isolate something. We went in with the full expectation that they'd want to do a MRI to look into the neurological symptoms. Both our primary vet and another vet whom we're friends with both suggested a neurological issue that would probably require a MRI to isolate.

We brought him in and spent about 5 hours with their neurology department. I believe that every vet in the neurology department who was present that day looked at him. They spent the majority of the examination (that we saw) testing his physical abilities.

They decided that no MRI was needed due to his specific combination of symptoms (saving us serious $$$). They felt that he either had a disease of the nerves or a disease related to where the nerves interacted with the muscles. They could definitively state there was no spinal cord injury, brain injury, neck or back injury, breaks, etc.. They could isolate which one by doing a biopsy of his nerves and muscle tissue if we wanted to.

Isolating the exact one would have been great, but would have cost considerable money and would have required anesthesia. We instead opted to try the long term treatments which would have been prescribed for many of them. Should they not work, we were going to take him in for the biopsy, another bloodwork analysis, etc..

Our cat's bloodwork that our original vet took did not show low levels of potassium, but did show elevated white blood cell counts. All the symptoms that our pet had seemed to point to hypokalemic myopathy, except for the one blood test which should have correlated with a the low potassium level. Our cat is a young Burmese (currently 1 year old) and this is a disease that rarely shows in young Burmese.

To make a long story short, the vet prescribed Vitamin E supplements as a treatment any nerve issues and potassium supplements in case he had hypokalemic myopathy. We give him a small scoop of potassium (your vet will typically prescribe it for liver failure so most vets should have it) in the morning and evening paired with a tiny dab of baby food (make sure that it's one that does not contain a toxin to cats). We have small 100u gel caps (orderable through CVS) that we cut open and take the contents out of. We do that in the evening and mix it with the potassium supplement and baby food.

It's since been six weeks and I'm cautiously, optimistically, able to say that this seems to have cured him. His personality has returned to his kitten levels. He's getting stronger each day. Today he completed a jump up to a bar stool that he'd never even completed before his first incident. He no longer twitches, has no tremors or stiff legs, sprints up the stairs like a track star and no longer feels "weird" to the touch. He's in the process of re-estabilishing himself as the "Alpha" cat in our house.

We're happy to have our cat back and are tickled about the low cost options (vitamin E pills are around $3 US for a 2 month supply and the potassium is $16 us for a month's supply). This seems like a very manageable, low cost solution long term.

One last thing to note -- I'd be very cautious if you're feeding your cat Wellness Brand Seafood dried cat food. Before the first incident started, we'd switched from Science Diet Kitten to Wellness Brand Seafood. We'd picked up one bag of the seafood and one bag of the chicken and were feeding our cats the seafood. Naturally when the first incident happened, we'd felt that it was probably linked to the food change. We tried reverting back to the old food, but could never stabilize him with the diet alone. We've since switched to a mix of the Science Diet Light and the Wellness brand Chicken to go along with the supplements mentioned above. One day we tried mixing in the Seafood again and he had his worst day on his recovery. We noticed a slight stiffening of his back left leg (which was his initial symptom). We pulled all the seafood pellets back out of the mix and he's not shown this again.

I was going to wait until the end of January to post this as I did not want to lead other pet owners astray. At the same time, I saw recent activity on this thread and feel like this might help people out. I'll check back on this thread in late January and provide a 3 month update.

Love4himies
December 19th, 2008, 10:59 AM
Thanks for the update. Have you contacted Wellness to let them know?

ryebread
December 19th, 2008, 11:19 AM
Truthfully -- I've not contacted Wellness. I cannot say for sure that it's linked to their product. Our other Burmese cat eats the exact same diet and has never shown any issues. If both had tracked to similar symptoms, then I'd absolutely be screaming at Wellness over their food and posting at every forum I could find. ;)

Maybe our cat just had a bad day on the one day of eating the seafood pellets mixed in? Maybe our cat has a seafood allergy? I'm not going to solely point fingers at their product.

I'm still using their chicken product as the cat enjoys eating it and it really gives him a soft, glossy coat. I will not be using the Seafood product again though.

My gut says that the cat probably has hypokalemic myopathy which shows up in young Burmese cats. When in a down cycle, he matches every single symptom.

Regardless of the ultimate root cause, if he can be treated with potassium and vitamin E supplements, then I'm more than happy to do it. His improvement is so drastic that one would not even believe that this is the same cat.

Hope this helps!

sugarcatmom
December 19th, 2008, 11:55 AM
One last thing to note -- I'd be very cautious if you're feeding your cat Wellness Brand Seafood dried cat food.

First, I would like to commend you on your perseverance in trying to help your kitty. That's great that he's doing better, and my fingers are crossed that he continues to do well.

As for the seafood cat food, even if it wasn't part of the problem, you were right in stopping it. Believe it or not, fish isn't a natural protein source for cats, since they actually evolved in the desert. It's a common allergen, and is likely to be higher in toxins than other foods. Check out my link above that lists reasons not to feed fish.


We've since switched to a mix of the Science Diet Light and the Wellness brand Chicken to go along with the supplements mentioned above.

Now about that Science Diet Light. I can't stress strongly enough that this is one of the worst cat foods on the market. Please please please find something better, preferably a quality canned food. Cats should not be eating dry food, and that applies exponentially to male cats, who are at great risk for suffering a urinary tract blockage when eating kibble. What makes the SD Light so particularly horrible is how high in carbohydrates it is. Cats are not designed to handle so many grainy carbs and it eventually takes a toll on them, often in the form of diabetes, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, allergies, dental disease, etc. The best food for cats is one that resembles what they've evolved eating: meat-based, high protein, low carb, and WET. This link explains everything you've ever wanted to know about feline nutrition, and how to transition over to a wet food diet: www.catinfo.org

Love4himies
December 19th, 2008, 12:41 PM
Truthfully -- I've not contacted Wellness. I cannot say for sure that it's linked to their product. Our other Burmese cat eats the exact same diet and has never shown any issues. If both had tracked to similar symptoms, then I'd absolutely be screaming at Wellness over their food and posting at every forum I could find. ;)

Maybe our cat just had a bad day on the one day of eating the seafood pellets mixed in? Maybe our cat has a seafood allergy? I'm not going to solely point fingers at their product.

I'm still using their chicken product as the cat enjoys eating it and it really gives him a soft, glossy coat. I will not be using the Seafood product again though.

My gut says that the cat probably has hypokalemic myopathy which shows up in young Burmese cats. When in a down cycle, he matches every single symptom.

Regardless of the ultimate root cause, if he can be treated with potassium and vitamin E supplements, then I'm more than happy to do it. His improvement is so drastic that one would not even believe that this is the same cat.

Hope this helps!

I am so glad he has gotten back to his old self.

I do second sugarcatmom's advice in getting a better quality canned for your kitties.

Oh and pics of course, you need to post some pics :D :lovestruck:

Blastasaurus
December 19th, 2008, 11:45 PM
Thank-you Rusty and Sugar for welcoming me to your forum.

Rye, that's so good. I'd also love to see some photos.

No, Burnsy has definitely not been exposed to Orijen cat food (thank god). I appreciate you mentioning that. I had no idea about the recall and it's, again, opened my eyes to how ignorant i have been on feline nutritional issues. As the carer of 3 cats i should really be more aware. Especially seeing Burnsy's symptoms are identical to those poor affected cats.

I agree with you Sugar, i should have said "balanced diet" rather that varied or rich. It was what i was meaning to say but it was late and sometimes words escape me. Their diet has been terribly unbalanced. In a way it's good to hear you confirm how bad this is. It's making me think i may have pin pointed his ailment and can do something about it. It would be nice to think i have some control over the situation and could end his suffering. You souldn't think of us as irresponsible or unattentive owners. The cats haven't always eaten this way. I have only changed to an all meat diet a month or 2 ago, ignorantly thinking less processed meals fit for human consumption would be an improvement to their diet. Problem was i presumed what was best rather than educating myself.

Razzy Cat is 18 months while Jaffa and Burnsy and both 10 months. They've all enjoyed a healthy, balanced, commercial diet for most of their lives. They were all raised to 6 months on Whiskas Kitten Food, Whiskas Milk Plus and Whiskas Dry Food for Kittens. They were then gradually weaned to the adult equivalent and we stopped the milk. Whiskas is a well respected, commercial brand. The dry food clearly states it contains carefully balanced levels of Calcium and Phosphorus. Extra Thiamin is used in the wet food so some survives the cooking process and it's full of natural antioxidants to boost his immune system. The milk also containes Thiamine and Taurine. Mince meat and fresh fish was a rare treat in the early days and of course fresh water has always been available. Razzy stayed on the kitten food for the full 12 months (as recommended) but Jaffa and Burns graduated earlier as they kept stealing Razzy's adult food anyway and the adult range had more flavours. We only started feeding the cats tined tuna in springwater on a regular basis a month or two ago. I then started giving them mince more often to add some variety. They've always had their Whiskas dry food served and topped up through out the day. Water changed twice a day. They've always atleast had a couple of Whiskas wet food pouches every week.

I'm in two minds about how much his diet has contributed to his current condition. There's no doubt it's a factor. Burnsy's decline could be seen as mirroring the change in his diet. He's been a little delicate and clumsy for a fews weeks now. He's been fragile and in pain for the last few days. His urinary infection was the cause of half his problems but would he have had the infection if he hadn't come off the commercial diet with all it's antioxidants? He seemed to have regained bladder control after he had his shot of antibiotics but he is still frail. I know antibiotics knock people and pets around but his balance and timidness is still a concern. Is he still suposed to be in pain? I still can't help but feel there's more to this story yet. He is back on his commercial kitty diet and we're looking into supplements but with sedatives, pain killers and antibiotics still in his system its hard to tell what's working and how much of a difference it's making. Only time will tell.

Unless anyone has more suggestions all i can do is continue surfing the net for answers while keeping him comfortble and well nourished. I'm scared it might get to the stage of neurological testing and am looking for any, less traumatic, alternative. I'll keep you all informed on his progress and anything more i find out.

RUSTYcat
December 20th, 2008, 01:22 AM
Blastasaurus-
Well, no Orijen is a relief!

Now, before you go...a word of caution about the anti-inflammatory the Vet prescribed.....

I know that Metacam is licensed for use in cats in AU. One thing you need to know is about its potential effects and about dosage.

Metacam is a kidney-killer unless it is used at miniscule dosages.

There is a very recent study (done in AU, interestingly) that demonstrated its safety and efficacy at a dosage about 1/10 of the licensed dosage...that should tell you something about its "strength"/potency....so, my brief message to you is, the less, the better. (In North America, Metacam overdosing is an epidemic, and cats are showing up "everywhere" with kidney failure...see www.metacamkills.com)

Here is the Australian study re reduced dosages
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18440263?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

If I were in your position, I'd speak with a trusted pharmacist, showing him/her the bottle and syringe and a copy of that abstract....s/he should be able to tell you how to reduce the dosage to the safer levels.

ryebread
January 28th, 2009, 04:52 PM
I just wanted to provide another update for those who might still be following this thread. As of this weekend, we'll officially be 3 months into the daily Vitamin E and Potassium treatments. As a result, our cat has never been better. He's now stronger, better balanced and more rambunctious than he's ever been in our time with him. He's just like a small child -- he'll play until he's utterly exhausted and then just drop and sleep wherever that may be. His litter mate (who never had a problem but who was historically more active) now cannot keep up.

I will not speculate as to whether the root cause was food related or whether the cat has an inherited disease. Regardless, we could not stabilize the cat on cat food alone and the treatment seems to have worked miracles.

It is amazing that this is the same cat. Our vet will be floored when he goes in for his routine check up.

Some posters here expressed a concern with the food that we were feeding our cats. Give our lifestyle and the fact that our two cats have very different eating patterns and appetites, dried food with wet food as "treats" is really our only option. We are in the process of switching them over to Innova's Evo line of dried cat food (currently we're blending this with the rest of our older cat food). They love the taste (way better than their previous favorite of Wellness brand) and they seem to have no negative side effects.

I cannot comment as to whether they eat less total volume when on the Evo food versus other foods. Many sites on the web have rumored this. I'm doing some testing though (days to eat a set amount of food) and I'll report back when they're 100% on Evo.

sugarcatmom
January 28th, 2009, 05:53 PM
Yay, that's so fantastic that your cat has made such a complete turn-around. You must be thrilled! :thumbs up

Some posters here expressed a concern with the food that we were feeding our cats. Give our lifestyle and the fact that our two cats have very different eating patterns and appetites, dried food with wet food as "treats" is really our only option.

Just so you know, it is possible to leave canned food out for free-feeding, if that's your concern. If you're still determined to feed dry, it would at least be a good idea to feed wet for more than just "treats". Doesn't have to be scheduled meals, but at least a daily serving of canned with some extra water mixed in will truly benefit your cats. I realize the convenience of kibble is extremely appealing, but the price for that convenience could be your cat's long-term health.

We are in the process of switching them over to Innova's Evo line of dried cat food.

While Evo is one of the better dry foods on the market, just a heads up that it's extremely high in calories. You might want to feed measured portions rather than a bottomless bowl, or you could end up with some very tubby kitties.

Love4himies
January 29th, 2009, 08:46 AM
Yay, that's so fantastic that your cat has made such a complete turn-around. You must be thrilled! :thumbs up

I too am happy you have found something that has made your kitty healthy and happy again

Just so you know, it is possible to leave canned food out for free-feeding, if that's your concern. If you're still determined to feed dry, it would at least be a good idea to feed wet for more than just "treats". Doesn't have to be scheduled meals, but at least a daily serving of canned with some extra water mixed in will truly benefit your cats. I realize the convenience of kibble is extremely appealing, but the price for that convenience could be your cat's long-term health.

Sugarcatmom is so right. Convenience is nice, but I also can tell you that cats who are transitioned from a dry diet to a canned usually become more active and happy. That is an indication to me that cats feed a kibble diet are chronically dehydrated possibly leading to kidney problems later in life.

While Evo is one of the better dry foods on the market, just a heads up that it's extremely high in calories. You might want to feed measured portions rather than a bottomless bowl, or you could end up with some very tubby kitties.

I hope you will reconsider wet food for your kitties. I leave canned food out for my cats all day while I am at work with no problems. Really opening a can of food is not much more work than measuring out some kibble.

ryebread
January 29th, 2009, 02:08 PM
I'm a guest on this forum who came to discuss a point problem in health that my pet faced. I am admittedly not a regular or a long time lurker.

I found this thread on Google after many hours of searching and research to try and get to the bottom of my pet's illness. I spent lots of hours and money on my pet and his overall health. I was extremely worried for months on end as we went through this cycle. Luckily we stumbled upon a very simple solution that I am hoping to share with others.

By comparison, many owners here and elsewhere have euthanized their pets as a result of very similar conditions. Hopefully this will be prevented and owners will try this before spending lots of money or turning to euthanization. Hopefully cats lives will be spared. That's my entire goal with sharing this information.

At the same time, while I appreciate the attempt to help and the genuine love for animals in general, I'm not sure that I'm thrilled with the constant badgering regarding the cat food on the thread. People don't know the dynamics of my home as a whole or the dynamics of my two cats. The one who has had the issues is a relative hog while the other is nearly completely indifferent to food. Our experiments with wet food result in him scarfing every single bit of food down. The ONLY way to serve wet cat food effectively to these two cats is to completely separate them, separate the portions, isolate them and then try to coerce the one to eat. Otherwise, the choice is to borderline starve them and then do the above. Neither are a viable solution.

Also, it is implied that I'm providing inappropriate level of care for my pets. I think that even the most avid cat lover would be quite surprised at the amount of grooming, cleaning, dedandering, playing, training, affection, toys, nail clipping, etc. that are provided for these pets.

I'm saying this because while I appreciate all the help and support, I'm admittedly not as happy about what seems to be the pushing of an agenda by some. While I have not searched other threads to see if the posters do this in other threads, I would hope that's not the case. It's a quick way to drive away posters and risk not having solutions such as this posted.

Love4himies
January 29th, 2009, 02:27 PM
Sorry you feel that way, it is just some people are not aware of the consequences of feeding kibble to their cats. I don't think anybody implied that you were giving borderline care. You can take the advice given to you or you can choose to ignore it. That is entirely up to you. I know the HUGE difference changing to a quality all canned diet did for my cats.

I also see the difference in my foster kittens that go from a raw/canned diet in my house to a kibble (Orijen, not the crap stuff) diet at the store where they are adopted from and that is in kittens, not even seniors. Sooooooooooo in saying that, you seem like a person that really loves your cats and thought you would like to know about kibble.

I do have a cat who eats everything and is pudgey along with two cats that are slow munchers. I know what it is like and the work that goes along with have this dynamics in a house so I can sympathize with you.

sugarcatmom
January 29th, 2009, 02:39 PM
At the same time, while I appreciate the attempt to help and the genuine love for animals in general, I'm not sure that I'm thrilled with the constant badgering regarding the cat food on the thread.

Sorry that you feel so defensive. I have not been hostile with my recommendations, so if that's what you're feeling, I can't help you there. The thing is, way too many cat owners don't put much thought into what it is they're feeding, they just blindly put their trust in Big Pet Food. The fact that you were feeding Science Diet Light at one point tells me that you haven't done a whole lot of research on feline nutrition. It doesn't mean you're a bad owner, only that you didn't know how bad that food truly is. I'm only trying to steer you in the right direction so that your cats can be as healthy as possible and live long happy lives. Evo is definitely a step up. But just so you know, even the best dry food is not as good as the worst canned. I'm only suggesting that if you can't feed wet full-time, at least consider adding more wet into your cat's diet. What's so wrong with that?

So that you understand my motivation for being so persistent on this issue, I also fed SD Light to my cats, for most of their lives. One then developed diabetes at the age of 9, and the other died at 11 yrs, from severe IBD. Both of these conditions, (and several others that I've spent big bucks on over the years) can be directly linked to a kibble diet. I've done a considerable amount of research over the past 6 years and I'm only trying to save you the same heartache. Take it as you like.

It's a quick way to drive away posters and risk not having solutions such as this posted.

Pretty much everyone has been quite receptive to learning new things that can help their cats. :shrug:

jeetz
February 21st, 2009, 08:35 AM
I have read the complete post and am sorry for everyone who have seen their cat's go through this pain, caz I have a 10 months kitten 'KITTY' and she recently has had the same problem, therefore I can imagine how painful it is to see your cat in such a state. However few details here; my 10 months old kitty was perfectly fine till yesterday and all of sudden she started rolling on the floor and immediately I noticed something wrong with her back legs (hind legs) we were at shock first and thought that shes got a paralysis attack, but after reading this post I think I have found the cause; since my cat is not allowed to go out of the house I am assuming the cause could be an improper diet (me being careless and feeding her adult cat food since last month or so) hence rise in blood glucose, or may be some nerve damage thing. I am more then sure its not physical damage that she has suffered.

I have immediately changed her diet from Me-O (adult) cat food to Me-O (kitten) ocean fish flavoured food and few improvements are seen. I am intending to take her to the vet after few more days only if situation gets worse, but before that I am checking her diet and reading everything and anything on forums. Is it ok for me to feed her with calves liver? since it is high in B-12 vitamins?

Will update more soon.

Regards,

jmob
March 22nd, 2009, 09:11 PM
My kitty Sam of 14 yrs. just recently came down with hind leg weakness. Took him to the Vet. Did all the blood work - all was normal. We put him on Duralactin. Sam takes it well. It is an inflammatory medication -- he is still weak, but all else is normal. He eats, drinks and relieves himself. He is unable to jump up on anything high, but have built him all sorts of short steps which he is able to navigate. I have five other kitties. My concern that this maybe contagious (?). My next step with my Vet is accupuncture and look into the possibility if he may have some sort of worm. He is an indoor kitty. If anyone has any answers or have received new info, would you be so kind as to email me the info. Sam came down with this about a month ago or so.
Thanks, John.

RUSTYcat
March 22nd, 2009, 10:34 PM
John-
Where are you located? (and welcome to the forum!!!)

jeetz
March 23rd, 2009, 01:59 PM
After my previous post, I found that changing kitty's food from dry to wet (purina canned) food all the symptoms such as weak legs, rolling on the floor, staying away from us & etc etc had gone away and she looked back to normal. But once again now she has started doing the same, this is after I have switched back to the dry food (for kittens) I have not yet started feeding her adult food, shes 10 months. I have consulted a vet and he says this is normal and kittens tend to do this when they're the only one being around, she will be normal in at least 10 days, on hearing this from the vet I was kinda shocked. However I am not taking that for an ans and will be switching to purina food once again to see the results, if she feels normal again then I think I,ll take her to a different vet.

Regards,

smithduke
March 27th, 2009, 04:52 PM
Has anyone heard back from Breeee123 at all? I'm worried because she hasn't given an update on her cat and fear the worst.

The same thing just happened to my cat Dillon two days ago. She's 20 and has been so healthy so I can't imagine what has happened to cause this so suddenly! As a matter of fact I made a comment to my husband at how agile and "kitten like" she is for her age. We rushed her to the vet and her blood work showed nothing remarkable except her thyroid was on the high end of normal. The x-ray also seemed normal. Dillon isn't in any pain and although she's been sleeping a lot, she seems very comfortable. She's not eating as much cat food as I'd like but she's at least willing to eat tuna and chicken. The vet put her on cortisone thinking that she possibly has a spinal or back injury. I've tried putting her in the litter box but she hasn't gone. Dillon is my little soul mate and it kills me to see her like this. Obviously I don't have a good feeling about this. I spent most of the day with her in bed, petting her, rubbing her ears and kissing her. Poor baby. :cry:

PeanutEmmaEli
April 6th, 2009, 02:33 PM
I just found the link from when I posted on this forum back in December.

Unfortunately, Peanut did not get better in the long run.

Her first incident that happened in the beginning of December. After three and a half weeks of giving her medicine and keeping her under careful watch, she seemed to get better. Then the day after Christmas it happened again, this time to both of her back legs. One minute she was up on the desk eating her food, then used the litter box. I try to clean it right away, so I got out the scooper and vacumn. She made it out of the litter box but would not move away from it. I nudged her to move her along, but then noticed she was dragging both her back legs. Her tail would not move either.

I called our regular vet, and the doctor could not speak to me yet. I called other vets to see if they knew what it could be after hearing of her previous incident. Then I called the vet's office where the neurologist was, and they gave me an appointment right away. They examined her, and it turned out it was a blot clot, or saddle thrombus. Peanut isn't a tolerable cat, she kept to herself and was friendly to our family members (my husband, myself, and our two dogs) - ONLY. No one else. She normally would growl and hiss if anyone tried to come near her. The vet said we could do a ton of tests, that would not promise anything. Then there would be her rehab - extracting her bladder (helping her go to the bathroom) and other things that Peanut would not tolerate. The vet said that it may not help her either. She told us that we would need to put her to sleep.

That was the hardest decision I have ever made. She wasn't an elderly cat, she was only 3 1/2!! How could something like that happen to such a young cat? It seemed like our only choice. After reading this forum months later, I wish we could have tried something with her diet, I don't know if it would have helped though.

Afterwards, I googled Saddle Thrombus in cats and it made me understand the situation better. I hope this never happens to your cats, it was horrible.

Love4himies
April 6th, 2009, 03:00 PM
I am so sorry to hear about your cat.

My co-workers cat developed a blood clot in his back leg and was in horrible pain. There was nothing to be done but have her precious baby PTS, diet change would not have changed the outcome. I do believe this may be caused by a heart defect.

smithduke
April 19th, 2009, 09:26 PM
I'm so sorry about Peanut! It's never easy!! :sorry:

jeetz
August 31st, 2009, 04:48 PM
Kitty seems to be fine, hence I did not bother returning to this thread.(Very selfish :sorry:) Anyways the latest is that my cutie pie kitty is doing brilliantly well (TOUCHWOOD) & food change for me has worked. I tried giving her the dry food a month regular and then she would show symptom's as earlier so I quickly changed back to wet food and would find that she is eating like a crazy cat and then once again she'd be fine. Therefore now I make sure that she finishes at least 2 big can's of the wet food (Purina, Me-O or anyother brand) in at least a period of 30 days.

jeetz....

lilycat
September 16th, 2009, 01:50 PM
Hello to everyone,

My cat has 8 years, i have never had a problem with her until now, i just noticed for the past couple of days that she is very weak on her back legs, the other day i was carrying her and usually when i let her down she jumps on the floor with no problem, but this time she jumped and fell to the floor, and had trouble standing up... also i have noticed that when she walks she tumbles to a side like because of weakness, also she doesn't want to eat or drink, she has lost weight and she just doesn't have energy like in the past.

I always give her ham bcz she loves it! and she always ask for ham, and i found out she had something weird (before i noticed the weak back legs) when the other night i gave her ham and she only smelled it and didn't want it... and she always does! even if she just ate her normal dry food...

i haven't seen her eating the litter but she doesn't want to eat and she is very weak!.... also i stretched her skin and put pressure on her gums to test for dehydration and she seems to be fine..

i of course am taking her to the vet tomorrow (today is closed) but i just can't figure it out!

jeetz
September 16th, 2009, 06:16 PM
Hello to everyone,

My cat has 8 years, i have never had a problem with her until now, i just noticed for the past couple of days that she is very weak on her back legs, the other day i was carrying her and usually when i let her down she jumps on the floor with no problem, but this time she jumped and fell to the floor, and had trouble standing up... also i have noticed that when she walks she tumbles to a side like because of weakness, also she doesn't want to eat or drink, she has lost weight and she just doesn't have energy like in the past.

I always give her ham bcz she loves it! and she always ask for ham, and i found out she had something weird (before i noticed the weak back legs) when the other night i gave her ham and she only smelled it and didn't want it... and she always does! even if she just ate her normal dry food...

i haven't seen her eating the litter but she doesn't want to eat and she is very weak!.... also i stretched her skin and put pressure on her gums to test for dehydration and she seems to be fine..

i of course am taking her to the vet tomorrow (today is closed) but i just can't figure it out!


This is so damn heartbreaking!! :(

Mer
December 29th, 2009, 09:41 PM
Hi all,
New to the forum but was seeking a solution for the exact same symptoms.
Took my baby girl kitty to the emergency (xrays, bloodwork, nothing found) then to a cat specialist (extra extra bloodwork, nothing found). Specialists suggested a neuromuscular specialist or accupuncture and prescribed light steroids. I switched food, held off on the steroids hoping she'd "snap out of it".
I switched to envelope soft food instead of canned. Stuck with chicken only.
And - in a week or two, she gradually started being her frisky, jumping self! This lead me to believe the problem was ingestion or exposure related. Though, I'm still uncertain.

Now...the boy kitty has slightly weakened back legs!

I will attend to the kitty litter - that one is news to me and worth a shot.

Also - I found I have poison house plants. Philodendron and Croton and Aloe Vera. All lovely but toxic - so I'll be passing those along to friends/family. (I grew up with outdoor farm cats so the whole indoor kitty care is an entirely new learning experience).

It is distressing. I'm open to learning as much as possible to get this resolved. I hate not being able to help or fix it. So please keep posting as you try and learn anything related!

quincymycat
December 30th, 2009, 04:12 PM
Hey there, Not sure if this helps you, but about a year ago, one of my kitties suddenly became weakened in the hind quarters and actually became parlaysed within about 3 days. I mean no ability to stand or sit on his own. My own vet who is very knowledgeable had no idea what the problem could be and sent him to be seen by a vet neuro. He was put through a full gamut of every test imaginable (most of which you already tried) and still the neuro had no idea what to diagnose him as having. He was put on a heavy dose of prednisone and was showing improvement very quickly - within about a week. He continued on the predisone for about 6 months, with weaning dosages and so far, after about an additional 6 months, thank goodness, has shown no relapse. I believe what they finally decided on was catch all "multiple neuropathy". Not very specific, but I guess when you have a bill as large as the specialist's was - including internal med, cardiology and neurology, they thought they should have some diagnosis.
I have to admit, I have no idea about the eating litter problem though. I have never heard of it before, but as a side note, just before this happened, I had changed to clumping kitty litter about 6 months prior.
I hope you come to some resolution. I know how hard this can be for you and your kitty. Good luck.

Dreamstalker
January 22nd, 2010, 08:52 PM
Hi everyone!

Our almost 19-year-old cat McGriff started acting "wobbly" today (I didn't notice it early enough to call our vet, will do so tomorrow). Initially I didn't think much of it as that happens on occasion, but as I observed him today I noticed that this was different. At times he will drag his left rear leg; other times he can walk, but wobbles. Mostly lies down (which again, is normal for his age).

He seems okay otherwise; he's eating, drinking, using the litter box (we use Tidy Cat Small Spaces clumping litter). No paleness on the gums/lips that I can notice and he doesn't appear lethargic. The weakness seems to come and go; he's been jumping up to his window seat tonight, I have a small set of kitty stairs next to my bed and he seems fine using those. It seems worse if he tries to get up from a lying-down position on the couch or bed (soft surface) or if he's been lying down for a while.

He did fall off the bed yesterday morning (went to roll over, rolled off the edge, bed is about 2 feet off the floor and he was able to grab onto the blanket and kinda slid down; I didn't actually see it happen), and yesterday I did find a turd right outside the box (that also happens on occasion so I'm not sure what the significance would be). The sudden onset of the leg weakness is just odd; he was perfectly fine last night.

I did notice last night that he seemed to be "itching" his left hind hip; I didn't see anything on or under the fur and he hasn't done that since.

Here's his list of conditions (poor guy):
Diabetes, controlled with insulin
Kidney problems, controlled with Prescription Diet k/d wet and dry (we also give chicken baby food and cooked runny egg yolk sparingly as a special treat) and sub-Q fluids 2x/week
Hyperthyroidism, he gets methimazole for that.

Dreamstalker
January 22nd, 2010, 09:09 PM
The same thing just happened to my cat Dillon two days ago. She's 20 and has been so healthy so I can't imagine what has happened to cause this so suddenly! Dillon is my little soul mate and it kills me to see her like this. Poor baby. :cry:
I know what that's like. We got McGriff when I was 10, so he's almost 20 now as well. Poor guy has been through so much; hit by a car, strokes (a stupid vet who put him on a human blood-thinner medicine), diabetes, kidney failure, etc.

Dreamstalker
January 26th, 2010, 05:53 PM
Update on McGriff:

The vet saw him today; they're going to keep him overnight to run some tests and also get X-rays to check for fractures, blood clots (he had reduced circulation in both hind legs), or anything else abnormal; he was very dehydrated so he'll get fluids to correct that as well as a blood thinner to hopefully deal with clots that aren't too bad.

EDIT: We had to put him down yesterday :cry: He was in severe congestive heart failure; his lungs were building up fluid, heart was throwing clots and we could see he was struggling to breathe. We saw him in a private room and he was growling, hissing and trying to claw us which he never, ever did. Even the vet said a referral to the big hospital would only put him through more pain which we just could not do. There wasn't a single dry eye in the clinic.

Kit Kat
February 11th, 2010, 04:56 AM
Hi,

Have you figured out anything new since you posted? My cat is having the exact same problem. He is only 10 months old and he has been healthy until the last week. At first I thought he was just imbalanced because he seemed to be swaying when he walked, he tipped over if I pet him, he tried to jump up on the table, missed, and fell on his back, etc. I thought maybe it was an inner ear problem so I brought him to the vet as soon as I noticed the problem.

The doctors at the clinic were stumped as they could not figure out what was wrong with him. They tested his glucose levels and said he doesn't have diabetes which oftentimes causes a cat's hind legs to be weak. They took x-rays and there were no bony abnormalities. He also did not have a heart murmur, his lungs were fine, and she checked out his ears, nose, and mouth which all looked fine. She said the pieces weren't fitting together and they just didn't know what was wrong with him. She said the next step would be to do a blood workup.

Right when I got home from the vet I placed my cat in his litter box because he'd been gone for a few hours and I figured he'd need to use it. After I put him in the litter box he started eating the kitty litter! He was eating mouthfulls. I pulled him out of there and put him by his food dish and he just went right back to the cat box and started to eat the litter.

The next morning I found out online that clumping cat litter contains something called sodium bentonite, and when ingested it causes cats to be weak and lethargic. For sure I thought this must be what was wrong with him. Then I started to wonder if he's sick because he's eating his cat litter or he's eating his cat litter because he's sick.

I went to the store and got the Cat's Pride brand of litter which states on the container it contains no sodium bentonite and is able to be flushed down the toilet. I read somewhere online that since sodium bentonite clogs pipes, imagine what it does to your kitty's intestines.

As soon as I filled the litter box with the new litter, my cat proceeded to eat the litter again. Since it didn't contain the sodium bentonite I wasn't AS worried, but I decided to go back to the store and get the Feline Pine brand, which is supposed to be completely safe and 100% pine, so it's okay if they ingest it, and it's able to be flushed down the toilet, etc. I haven't put the new litter in the box yet but I plan on doing so tonight.

I've read online that cats might eat their litter because they are lacking something in their diet. One source I found said that cats might eat their cat litter if they are calcium deficient or if they are anemic. I haven't had the blood test done yet so I don't know if it's either of these things. Another thing I read is that being anemic is probably caused by an underlying issue. I'm really hoping there isn't a serious problem with my kitty. I've only had him 6 months and he and my dog are best friends. I would be devastated.

I wasn't able to call the vet today and tell them about him eating his litter because they are closed. I left a message for the vet to call me back so I will be able to talk to her tomorrow.

One more thing I want to add that sounds completely crazy is that when we moved into this house 6 months ago, for some reason there was a small cinder block sitting on the floor in between the washer and dryer and nobody picked it up. I'm not sure why we just left it there but my boyfriend noticed, I'm not sure how long ago it started, that our cat was licking the cinder block. I'm wondering if maybe he does have some sort of deficiency and his eating the litter and licking the cinder block were giving him something he needs. We just threw the block outside recently and soon after is when he got sick. I'm not sure if he just started eating the kitty litter right after we threw the block outside but I've never noticed him doing it in the past. I have no idea if that makes any sense but I don't want to completely throw out that detail in case there's something important about it. I haven't told the vet about this yet because I feel kind of stupid saying I let my cat lick this cinder block for who knows long and didn't bother to throw it out.

Briana, have you ever noticed your cat eating litter? Even though his legs seem weak does he still seem alert and like everything is functioning properly except his legs, or does he appear sick overall?

Sorry this was so long but I wanted to give you as much information as possible. Maybe we can help each other along and let each other know if we find anything else out. Is there anything else you can share about your cat that might be helpful? Any similarities to my story?

Thanks!

I know this might not be any help at all, and I know it's a while since you posted, and I've only just joined, but I had a very similar problem with one of my cats. When you said you'd found of cinder block this struck a cord with me. About 5 years ago my British Blue girl - Dimples started acting strangely she didn't eat her cat litter but kept licking the fireplace where I have a woodburning stove, and also she started to come out in terrible spots on her head and her coat and muscels seemed to be withering. Anyway she had every test imaginable and nothing came up even biopsy on the sores on her head was clear - the Vets didn't know what was causing it and prescribed steroids which didn't do a thing. Until one day I was in the bathroom, and I found her licking a lump of soap which was on the bath, I kept it because it was a pretty colour, and noticed that it was well and truly 'used' but not by me. I realised that Dimples had been eating it for some time. I removed it immediately and threw it out - it was Coal Tar soap (I now know very poisonous). Dimples made an almost lightening recovery, she stopped licking the fireplace and went on for another 5 years (died this Autumn). I'd recommend getting rid entirely of that cinder block, check there aren't any more or anything like it in the house. Don't think it's the cat litter think that's a symptom. It could be an allergy. Hope this helps a bit, sorry to hear your baby is in ill.

Kit Kat
February 11th, 2010, 05:06 AM
[QUOTE=Kit Kat;883376]Hi, I'm new to this, but something similar happened to my cat.I know this might not be any help at all, and I know it's a while since you posted, and I've only just joined, but I had a very similar problem with one of my cats. When you said you'd found of cinder block this struck a cord with me. About 5 years ago my British Blue girl - Dimples started acting strangely she didn't eat her cat litter but kept licking the fireplace where I have a woodburning stove, and also she started to come out in terrible spots on her head and her coat and muscels seemed to be withering. Anyway she had every test imaginable and nothing came up even biopsy on the sores on her head was clear - the Vets didn't know what was causing it and prescribed steroids which didn't do a thing. Until one day I was in the bathroom, and I found her licking a lump of soap which was on the bath, I kept it because it was a pretty colour, and noticed that it was well and truly 'used' but not by me. I realised that Dimples had been eating it for some time. I removed it immediately and threw it out - it was Coal Tar soap (I now know very poisonous). Dimples made an almost lightening recovery, she stopped licking the fireplace and went on for another 5 years (died this Autumn). I'd recommend getting rid entirely of that cinder block, check there aren't any more or anything like it in the house. Don't think it's the cat litter think that's a symptom. It could be an allergy. Ask your Vet to check Hope this helps a bit, sorry to hear your baby is in ill:cloud9]

Vinny&VitosMa
February 28th, 2010, 01:16 PM
Hello Everyone, I've just read this entire blog and am thankful to read that some of your kitties have recovered after having hind leg weaknesses. I have two cats-Vinny & Veto. Vinny, a purebread blue pt siamese who is 4 and 1/2 years old is the smartest and most friendly and loving cat I have ever known. (Veto is a great cat too, but often skiddish and moody and as healthy as a tank.) Vinny has had different health problems since the first week in our home as a tiny kitten. Most notably at 1 years old (on his birthday) he was having difficulty breathing, wheezing alot and coughing. We took him to our regular vet who quickly referred us to Vet Specialists out-of-town since his lungs were filling w/fluid. We took him there. He was hospitalized that day and stayed there in their ICU for about a week. They honestly saved him..He was in one of those oxygen tents the newborns go into! They performed every test in the book and then treated him for broncho-pneumonia with complications from asthma. We had no idea he was asthmatic! He now has an albuterol inhaler (which he never needs anymore) but is also on a daily steroid-dexamethasone.

About a year ago, we noticed the his right hind knee would pop-out when walking/running..sometime he could get it back in himself and continue on his way..other times my husband would lay him down and stretch it out..This went on for weeks..then miraculously it quit happening. We thought perhaps a side affect from the daily steroid.

A week ago on Saturday, something worse happened for the first time. He was walking beside me and just fell-down..kinda like a face-plant. He got back up himself and started hobbling. (He was just at the vet on 1/22/10 for his rabies shot and check-up. He had also had had a couple days of diareah right before the appt that we thought maybe started from a change in his food flavor (lamb to chicken). My husband had to wash his backside 2x b/c it got on his legs. That completely went away and the Vet said he looked great.)

Now we've been watching him to see if the hip-hind leg thing gets better like before with the knee. Over the past 7 days, I have been watching him. There are days where it seems like he is fine. He still jumps on the bed, couch, sink, etc. He goes all around the house and is eating/drinking fine. But then there are days when it seems like it is getting worse like today. It doesn't seem like it is the knees either but rather both hindlegs, like the hips maybe. He hasn't fallen down again that I've observed but they definitely go-out..sometimes he just stops and starts again and he hobbles..like an old man. He is still super happy, jumping on things, eating/drinking, purring but seems more tired. I also think his gums are less pink.

My husband isn't going to be game for another $5K worth of testing/treatment hence our not taking him to the vet yet (plus he has had the knee thing before that totally went away and is otherwise acting normal.) I'm going to just take him anyway tomorrow, but wanted to get feedback from you all that have gone down this path. PLEASE.

LibbyCat
July 31st, 2010, 03:38 PM
My mom's cat Libby is a Russian Blue. She is about 6 years old. She probably is a bit mixed, since her grey hair is very long and her eyes are yellow. Anyway she is a sweet cat, barely makes a peep, and has always had robust health.

A couple months ago, she started to fall over and couldn't jump up onto the bed or couch. I googled her symptoms and found this thread. Frankly, reading other cat owner's plights with similar cat symptoms, was a very scary read.

We took her to the vet here in Pembroke Pines, FL and he quickly found a tenderspot on her spine. He took a couple of xrays and found some inflammation between two of her vertebrae. I don't remember which two, but it was where the nerves divert to the hind legs. He didn't know the cause or extent of damage to the disc, but suggested an injection of a strong anti-inflammatory into the disc. He advised that to go any further would require MRI's and that nobody spends less than $5k for that process.

He gave her the injection and it took about a day for it to take effect. Happy to report that she regained her full abilities and the problem was resolved.

ske
August 8th, 2010, 11:21 AM
I'm shocked by how many others have experienced this! It's comforting and heartbreaking at the same time.

I have a 12.5-year-old female ragdoll who has always been prone to bothersome health issues- food allergies, horrible teeth (despite several dental procedures under anesthesia), digestive issues, etc. These have been more or less manageable, until now. Last weekend, she tried to jump onto the windowsill, missed it with her rear legs, and fell. I did a double-take, but dismissed it since she's been a bit accident-prone for as long as I've had her. I did watch her more closely, though, and suspected she was maybe feeling a little stiff, but didn't get concerned until Thursday evening, when I noticed that she would take a few labored steps and then stumble or sit. She was walking on her hocks.

I took her to the vet Friday morning (actually cried in the waiting room, expecting the worst) and he did a full physical exam, urine test and bloodwork. All of this checked out normal (no diabetes), and he diagnosed her with neuropathy. He prescribed prednisolone 5mg and she has now had 5 doses over 2 days, with no visible results. His plan is to try the prednisolone for 10 days before moving on to other testing. I am, however, a very anxious pet parent, and am already beginning to feel nervous about not seeing any results so far.

Does anyone have an idea how long steroids should take to produce a result? Thanks so much for reading - I'm a wreck!

AmberH
November 4th, 2010, 09:34 PM
Hi everyone!!!!

I'm new to the board, found it several weeks ago, bc our own cat started having symptoms of her back legs giving out. (Lassie, 1 yr old.....our kids named her bc her coloring is like the famous dog's!) :)

I researched the internet, and from the information I gained from this forum, and many prayers to the Lord, it appears that our kitty is completely better!! It has been several weeks now (over a month) since she has exhibited those symptoms, so I wanted to write back and share with you the good news, and hopefully help anyone else out there!! Here are the details:

Out of the blue, she started having her hind legs give out....this was hard to determine at first because she must've been so scared that she was kind of tumbling and backing into corners, and meowing....we could not figure out what was going on!! It would last just a few seconds and then she was fine. A few hours later, the same thing would happen again. She seemed just fine in between those episodes. Well, a few days went by and it seemed to be getting worse.....episodes happening closer together, however, she seemed more used to it at this point, so she wasn't as terrified, being more calm about it and we could then see what the problem was.....her back legs seeming to just fail on her. I had already talked to the vet, and they had no idea what it could be, and said they could only do a blood panel. Well, as I researched the internet and found this forum, I found that many others had gone before me....same symptoms....had the blood panel done.....and it revealed nothing either. From what I read, all the vets were completely mystified, even after doing test after test. So.....the thought of bringing her in and spending all that money only to be told that they didn't know, I have to admit didn't seem very helpful. One week later after the first symptom, she finally had a day where it suddenly began happening constantly, and lasting a long time, she was almost dragging her poor little legs behind her, and looking up at me sadly.

We were praying and asking the Lord for wisdom!!!!! (and of course healing!)
What others here on the forum had written got me thinking.....there were several things people mentioned that seemed to be in common.....one had mentioned a cat licking a cinder block, another cat licking a brick by the fireplace.....another person had changed the diet of her cat and given vitamins, and had witnessed her cat totally recover.
I started thinking about what had changed that week in our home when she began having the symptoms.....why was it out of the blue? Well, that very week, I had 1) put out my fall decorations 2) used a different kitty litter that a friend had passed on to me (one of the members mentioned her cat kept eating it)
and 3) my husband had brought home a new candle and set it out

Well, I threw out the kitty litter right away and would you also believe, my kids out of the blue came in the room and told me, "Mom, Lassie is licking on a candle!" Yes!! It was that same candle....it was in a little pot, a citronella candle. Of course I got rid of that right away, and I also changed her diet completely to canned food that day (NOTE: diet is SOOOO important for a cat!!! Our last cat was completely healed of all his diabetes symptoms by putting him on a canned food diet and taking him off the dry food....not saying that will work for everyone, just that it regulated our cat!!!!) Well, I had gotten a little lazy with our new cat, and gave her dry food occasionally, but I stopped that too.

After that day, for several days I did not see any symptoms....I was so relieved! Then one day she seemed to have a small episode. I then got rid of the fall arrangement sitting on our sofa table, bc I had seen her chewing on that, but hadn't really thought that was it. After that day, over a month ago, I have seen NO MORE EPISODES!!! THANK YOU LORD!!!!!!

I would also like to add that my husband was reading an old magazine last week (National Geographic, October 2007 issue) and he quoted to me from an article that caught his attention.......it was talking about how certain foods are poisonous to pets, and caution should be taken to make sure they don't ever ingest them....well, we've probably all been made aware of many of them.......however, regarding Macademia Nuts, it said, "Experts have yet to determine why just a few of these nuts can produce tremors, even temporary paralysis, in a dog's hind legs" WOW!!!! That sounded similar to what was happening in our cat!!!!! And the cats on this forum I've been reading about!!!! Could they possibly be slowly being poisoned by something we just don't know about?

So, whether it was the prayer, or one of those items I threw out, or all of the above, our dear kitty is all better, and happily back to her playful self!!! We are SO grateful!!!!

So, if your kitty is having the same symptoms, yes, take him to the vet, and also take some time to really think about what you have done differently since he started having problems, and/ or whether you need to change his diet too! (and pray!! :) )

I hope this helps some of your kitties out there!!!!

pbpatti
November 4th, 2010, 10:06 PM
What a great thing you have done here, thank you for taking the time to write about your experiences with your cat regarding lameness in hind legs. I do not have kitties but you have maybe helped dozens of kitty owners that come across the forum and thread. Thank you AmberH... patti

dicos
November 6th, 2010, 10:18 PM
Hi, my 5yo boy Dicos has come down with weak back legs. Its been like this for 2-3 days now and it just seemed to come out of nowhere. He cant jump at all, walks slow with his hips and tail down. He cries in frustration. If you put too much pressure on his back legs he'll cry too.

Ive read all the posts and Im going to try giving him more wet food (he eats dry) and get him some liver Also gonna change out to a new litter brand. I bought a cheap variety this month b/c funds are low.

He has always had a bad habit of licking the shower curtain but never had this problem before. One of the cats, either him or his sister, had bad diarrhea a week or two ago but it cleared up and we never found out who had it. Anyway, just wanted to thank yall for all the good advice and Ill let you know how he does. Praying he is ok, he is such a good boy.

Love4himies
November 6th, 2010, 10:37 PM
Please take you cat to a vet. It could be as serious as an injury or a blood clot.

vl356
March 26th, 2011, 09:04 PM
My 9 yr old female cat had walked wobblely and could not able to jump. I took her to the vet, the vet injected her medication, I am not satisfied because I think the med for pain is too strong. So, I use Glucosamine HCL complex (a supplement) for her, she walks well now. She walks and runs but still not jump. I found glucosamine is helpful to joint, and it is a supplement which you can get from your vet or pet store.

vl356
April 15th, 2011, 10:17 PM
My cat jumps onto Sofa today. My practice works, better than the vet. I did not check her blood and do X-rays as vet said. Since the vet prescribed the pain killer to her, which has potential bad side effect, I think that is not right. I know if joint hurts, it takes a hundred days to heal. My cat did not jump since Feb. 1, 2011. Today, she jumps again!

catlover661
April 20th, 2011, 06:45 PM
http://hubpages.com/hub/Cerebellar-Hypoplasia basically weak motor skills, these cats are disabled in effect, and though can live long lives, do have to be "sympathetically managed with affection and understanding" because they will wobble and fall, do watch the video, it could also mean your kitten/cat wouldnt have to necessarily be put to sleep.

Kittin la Gorda
August 5th, 2011, 07:22 PM
Hi all,

I found this post on Tuesday (today's Friday) when looking online for anything I could find to understand why my beautiful Kittin (8 year old female Chartreux, rescued 7 years ago) suddenly had weak back legs and problems walking normally and jumping.
Suffice to say the info I read here was brilliant especially those comments about and with links to issues pertaining to DIET.
Not withstanding, I took Kittin to the vet today given that, whilst her mobility improved significantly over the past few days, she had not poo'd for all these days and I was worried that she had constipation (caused by early diabetes perhaps?), or a bladder problem (but she was pee'ing ok), or a kidney problem, or worse (FIP, CKD...etc).
Vet did 2 xrays of the spinal column after feeling around to determine that whilst Kittin was evidently in pain it wasn't from kidney or spleen issues but back, maybe muscular (strain, bruised - she's very active despite being 6 kilos 13 pounds and so a little tubby).
Xrays revealed absolutely and perfectly normal spine with maybe just slight early stages of arthrosis in V2 & V3 evidenced by the tell-tale small growths from the edges of the vertebrae which is the body's way of attempting to protect itself and bind the vert's together.
Anyway, what it turned out to be (we hope) is inflammation and perhaps injury, remediable with pain and swelling meds (Artrin and Arnica) which are a trial to administer orally but...I will persist !
Constipation will hopefully pass too - at least she did **** once today (pardon my french) after coming home.
Fingers crossed that is all it is.
Having said that, I did read a LOT about diet thanks to the many many GOOD links from this forum.
I will summarize here what I read (it came from - http://www.catinfo.org) for those of you unlucky enough after me to have to try and take this all in as I did.

What causes sudden health changes and problems (often fatal) in cats?

* if we feed our cats dry food (ANY) we are doing them serious harm despite all the marketing hype, convenience, cheaper cost and typical vet's lack of good advice to cat owners regarding food and diet (not to say the marketing of the dry cat food manufacturers who fill it with wheat not meat to make $$$).
* Cats are carnivores and meant to eat meat (fur and feathers are best - so rabbit and poultry - rather than red 4 legged animal meat or fish (fish not even - see below)
* cats are not meant to eat grain-based dry food which lacks moisture vital for avoiding dehydration that causes kidney problems & renal problems - and bladder problems especially in male cats ; and which lacks animal protein (plant protein is often what's used and this is not the same nor what a cat needs); and dry food is loaded with carbohydrates (which cats don't need in the quantities that are in dry food (40-50% of calories come from carbs in dry food when what they really need is that level of calorie intake from protein, but sadly however as low as 5-10% of the calories come from protein in dry food - when their diet requires the other way around); and the worst is that dry food lacks moisture (water) which cats need lots of, that they do get from wet canned food (typically with 75-80% water content) but don't get from dry food (which typically has about 10% water content), and they still do not even get enough if they drink from a bowl/tap/pond etc aside; and so with all the above when combined - a diet of dry food (high carbs, low water content, low protein) - often if not most times results in diabetes (or worse) in cats....something controllable and reversible with a 100% non-dry food diet if caught early on or before signs appear !!!

It's all here...
http://www.catinfo.org AND
http://catnutrition.wordpress.com/2007/09/22/eight-strikes-against-fishy-feeding-for-cats/

I hope as a summary this is "educational"...sure is something I never knew and no-one ever told me but wish they had !

Good luck fellow cat lovers !

Cat Woman 77
November 4th, 2011, 07:29 PM
One of my cats had a problem with her legs, she could not stand up. This happened approximately one week after her vaccination. For 10 days she was so sick that I was afraid we would lose her. I had to leave the country during that period and my mother was doing everything to help her, including calling a naturopathic doctor. The doc prescribed my cat a cleansing/detoxification drops. It helped. I will never again vaccinate my pets for anything other than rabies - and only ONCE.

Now, my other cat has a problem with his hind legs. He was given Revolution. I wonder if it had anything to do with his condition.

Melissalc
November 14th, 2011, 06:04 AM
I have a 4 year old Bengal who is also experiencing weak hindquarters . We had noticed that he was kind of clumbsy for a while, but we didn't think much of it and chalked it up to his long slender body. Suddenly one day his back legs became very stiff and he began walking rather like an iguana. This has gotten increasing worse. If you even touch his hindquarters he falls over and has to drag himself up by his front legs when he attempts to jump. We took him to our regular vet who x-rayed him and found some hip displasia which he said shouldn't cause the weakness he was exhibiting. Next it was on to our local veterinary school , UC Davis, where they sent him to the neurological department where he spent the night and had a battery of tests including a complete head to toe MRI, a spinal tap, a blood panel and and exploratory surgery to his inner ear. Basically we make a large donation to UC Davis because they came up with nothing. My vet tried him on a course of steroids and latter pain meds for the hips. Benny is the sweetest best natured cat I have ever seen and this is killing me. It has been about 4 months now and there has been no improvement. I have been reading some of the other symptoms that you have described and have noticed that he did start marking a lot. He has been strictly on a raw diet of chicken and rabbit since he was a kitten and the vet tried some vitamin injections to see if that was lacking. I have not noticed him licking anything but he has developed a voracious appetite in the last week or so and will lay by his bowl and scream for more after I feed him. Since he was a kitten he has always had a thing for chewing leather an has destroyed a few shoes in his time. I don't know if whatever they cure the leather with could have something to do with it. I'm desperate to figure this out and hope someone here has an answer. Thanks for listening.

sugarcatmom
November 14th, 2011, 08:18 AM
He has been strictly on a raw diet of chicken and rabbit since he was a kitten

What's in the raw diet? Is it whole prey model? Ground? With or without supplements? Where do you source your meat from?

he has developed a voracious appetite in the last week or so and will lay by his bowl and scream for more after I feed him.

I'm imagine he's been tested for diabetes. Has he lost any weight? How are his energy levels?

Medea
March 2nd, 2012, 05:05 PM
I have been searching the internet for answers as my FurBee has alot of these same symptoms. We have done all the blood tests etc and come up normal. Two months ago this was a healthy, vital young cat, now he has lost alot of muscle tone, no appetite, just lays around. The vet is stumped.
I've tried everything I can think of. He's been on canned food with small amounts of dry food, now even raw food doesn't interest him. The vet put him on a course of prednisone but so far ( 2 days) there is no change. Things are looking grim for him and I am at my wits end. This is a cat who had a voracious appetite for food and life and to see him weak and lethargic is heartbreaking. I thank you for this forum as a place that I can spout off and get my concerns out in the open, I will keep you informed as to our outcome.:cry:

NWMoomin
March 28th, 2012, 03:55 PM
I found this forum after hours of Googling the same symptoms others have discussed. My then-7 mo. old rescue cat, Ponchik, developed weak hindquarters -- first just sort of clumsy, then losing all muscle tone. He'd jump down from a sofa and his hind end would just collapse. He began sleeping more, lost his appetite, and instead of raising his rump when pet, he would seem to "melt" under the slightest touch. He'd had a severe ear mite case leading to infection, so we originally thought it might be neurological damage. (Switched vets during the course of the issue, and turned out he was also allergic to that antibiotic ... new vet was *far* better & cat specialist.) Nothing helped him improve -- not antibiotics, not prednisolone, not anti-inflammatories, nothing. He continued to grow weaker. His hind legs just weren't working.

Our vet ran tests after tests. Nothing showed up. Then I found this thread, read the posts by Ryebread, and I looked more closely at my cat. After some research into traits and characteristics, and looking at pictures, I realized Ponchik was obviously part-Burmese. I went back to my vet with some of this information, but he said that my cat didn't look Burmese (except for his coat), that his potassium and CK serum levels were normal, and that he had no cervical ventroflexion (dropping his head/neck, which is supposedly the classic symptom of hypokalemia). So I kept researching, while my cat kept declining -- and by now, he had a major eye inflammation that wasn't responding to treatment, & it was getting redder and more closed. He also started peeing outside the litter box around the house because he'd wake from sleep & be too weak to get himself to the box in time.

I found another link to an article on vet site that discussed how hypokalemia could occur with or *without* the cervical ventroflexion (http://www.thecatclinic.com.au/category/info-for-vets/). At the end of my rope, I took that to my vet, who said we could try a low dose of potassium as a last ditch effort. (My cat was now 10 mo. old, and she thought he was declining too rapidly and we might have to discuss "other options," i.e., euthanasia.)

It's now been less than two weeks, and like Ryebread's posts, my cat is improving drastically. He gets 1/2 tablet of potassium 2x/day. His back legs are gaining strength fast, and while he's still a touch clumsy, he climbed up into my child's top bunk yesterday, and he's been playing again (chasing a string down the hall). His appetite is back & he's gaining weight. He'd stopped talking, and now won't shut up -- and his voice is stronger (talkiness is also a main Burmese trait). He follows us everywhere and simply seems SO much happier. Our other two cats, who had started ignoring him, are now interacting with him again. His recovery is absolutely amazing. Ryebread talked about the major improvement of her Burmese kitten in 3 and 6 weeks. I feel as though if mine has improved this much in less than 2 weeks, I have real hope that he's going to be "normal" again.

I am so thankful that I pursued this course of treatment, and that I found these resources through Google and kept searching. If not, my cat would probably be dead by now. I don't know if this will help anyone else. But if you suspect your cat is even part Burmese, and he/she shows any weakening, weight loss, etc. (do a search on Ryebread's posts for a great description of symptoms), talk to your vet about potassium supplements -- EVEN if your cat isn't dropping its head/neck, and EVEN if the potassium level, white blood count, CK level are all normal. The bottom line is that a low dose won't hurt, and it's meant the difference between life and death for my kitty. We are so, so happy!:)

willow007
April 28th, 2012, 11:53 PM
A blood clot traveled and blocked a major artery that affected his hind legs. It's not that uncommon. Happened in a few weeks. It'd painful. Please ask your vet about such blood clots. So sorry but my kitty didn't survive it.

ggirard
May 11th, 2012, 09:14 PM
tell you vet to check for heart disease, it's very hard to diagnose heart disease, I found out the hard way. The only way would be with an ultra sound, my kitty's heard sounded fine when they checked it, even on the x ray it looked fine. Cats can hide heart disease very well. My kitty had the same problem two years ago with her legs. Then last month she got really sick - I posted the story on the forum. We didn't know what it was, they finally put her on meds but she lasted a month. Still grieving as I'm writing this I loved her so much. Then the vet told me that looking back that would've been a sign, but at the time they also had no idea what it was. If you catch it early a cat can live a long live with heart disease, so please get her heart checked out. My kitty was only six and I wish they could've saved her, but they tried everything. Please keep us updated. :confused:

Lycan709
May 27th, 2012, 08:34 AM
My cat Lycan (I have a thread posted on here somewhere) has develeoped rear leg weakness and muscle spasms. He's constantly stretching out his back legs like they are bothering him, and the muscle spasms include almost his whole body. Other than that, he seems fine. He is eating and drinking, and playing. He just seems more tired now, and has to take breaks for his legs. The vet did a bunch of tests, including a Neurological exam, and nothing has shown up to be wrong. The Neurologist says that it's probably FIP. But he has nothing to back up that information - it's just a guess based on the fact that he doesn't have anything else wrong with him. He told me the next step would be to do a Spinal Tap which is very dangerous, and life-threatening. I do not want to do this to my cat and risk his life - what if he doesn't have this fatal disease?! I've been looking everywhere online for information, and there are so many possibilities. I'm at a loss. He also likes to lick and eat things that are not edible. I'm going to try and change his food to wet, and maybe change his litter to pine. Does anyone have any further suggestions? Here is a link to the spasms he is having:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qr6fJwnZQBg&feature=g-all-s

CatWalking
November 5th, 2012, 12:38 PM
I was researching online and came across this string over the last few days of doing my own online research... My cat has a lot of the same or similar issues as stated here. He first wasn't walking with his tail upright, then he wanted to be next to me, and was shaking. Rapidly, he stopped walking and didn't want to use his hind legs. He was in obvious pain and let me know. Took him to vet, then emergency vet, etc. X-Rays, blood work, antibiotics, prednisone, pain meds, enema, etc... was performed. I added in more supplements, he eats a fabulous diet...Nobody could find anything wrong. He was in pain constantly, crying whenever he had to move. I had to bring him food and water, he would eat. He would drag himself to the litterbox which I set his petbed next to, when I couldn't lift him to it when I wasn't home.

Then, my primary vet wanted to use a laser. I would try anything at this point, it was awful to hear him cry with pain, and see him like that. As long as he didn't walk on his hind legs, he was okay laying on his side. So, he had a few minutes of laser across his mid to lower spine area. I packed him up and brought him home to his petbed. They were suspecting some kind of trauma or injury to spine area which affected legs... I will try anything!

When I opened the crate, he walked out, walked around (kind of fumbling a little) and seemed bright, happy, meowing with joy and chatty with me. He sat down, then got up went to his litterbox to use it, then walked around me for a few, then went to his bed to lay down. I am blown away! Who knew? I wanted to make sure I got the word out, as I was stumped at what was wrong with him and nothing helped him. He is still uncomfortable, and I have several more appointments for laser. It's obvious he now has some kind of injury which could take weeks and weeks to heal up. The laser I believe from what I saw today will help and assist with moving along his healing.

I want to be sure that I registered so I could post to this forum, to bring awareness that this is one more thing to possibly ask your vet or try! I have HOPE and I am happy!!! We'll see over the coming weeks!

Bayham12
January 7th, 2013, 03:16 PM
I found this forum after hours of Googling the same symptoms others have discussed. My then-7 mo. old rescue cat, Ponchik, developed weak hindquarters -- first just sort of clumsy, then losing all muscle tone. He'd jump down from a sofa and his hind end would just collapse. He began sleeping more, lost his appetite, and instead of raising his rump when pet, he would seem to "melt" under the slightest touch. He'd had a severe ear mite case leading to infection, so we originally thought it might be neurological damage. (Switched vets during the course of the issue, and turned out he was also allergic to that antibiotic ... new vet was *far* better & cat specialist.) Nothing helped him improve -- not antibiotics, not prednisolone, not anti-inflammatories, nothing. He continued to grow weaker. His hind legs just weren't working.

Our vet ran tests after tests. Nothing showed up. Then I found this thread, read the posts by Ryebread, and I looked more closely at my cat. After some research into traits and characteristics, and looking at pictures, I realized Ponchik was obviously part-Burmese. I went back to my vet with some of this information, but he said that my cat didn't look Burmese (except for his coat), that his potassium and CK serum levels were normal, and that he had no cervical ventroflexion (dropping his head/neck, which is supposedly the classic symptom of hypokalemia). So I kept researching, while my cat kept declining -- and by now, he had a major eye inflammation that wasn't responding to treatment, & it was getting redder and more closed. He also started peeing outside the litter box around the house because he'd wake from sleep & be too weak to get himself to the box in time.

I found another link to an article on vet site that discussed how hypokalemia could occur with or *without* the cervical ventroflexion (http://www.thecatclinic.com.au/category/info-for-vets/). At the end of my rope, I took that to my vet, who said we could try a low dose of potassium as a last ditch effort. (My cat was now 10 mo. old, and she thought he was declining too rapidly and we might have to discuss "other options," i.e., euthanasia.)

It's now been less than two weeks, and like Ryebread's posts, my cat is improving drastically. He gets 1/2 tablet of potassium 2x/day. His back legs are gaining strength fast, and while he's still a touch clumsy, he climbed up into my child's top bunk yesterday, and he's been playing again (chasing a string down the hall). His appetite is back & he's gaining weight. He'd stopped talking, and now won't shut up -- and his voice is stronger (talkiness is also a main Burmese trait). He follows us everywhere and simply seems SO much happier. Our other two cats, who had started ignoring him, are now interacting with him again. His recovery is absolutely amazing. Ryebread talked about the major improvement of her Burmese kitten in 3 and 6 weeks. I feel as though if mine has improved this much in less than 2 weeks, I have real hope that he's going to be "normal" again.

I am so thankful that I pursued this course of treatment, and that I found these resources through Google and kept searching. If not, my cat would probably be dead by now. I don't know if this will help anyone else. But if you suspect your cat is even part Burmese, and he/she shows any weakening, weight loss, etc. (do a search on Ryebread's posts for a great description of symptoms), talk to your vet about potassium supplements -- EVEN if your cat isn't dropping its head/neck, and EVEN if the potassium level, white blood count, CK level are all normal. The bottom line is that a low dose won't hurt, and it's meant the difference between life and death for my kitty. We are so, so happy!:)

Having same problem with my cat. He adopted us about 5 mo ago .we do know him for about 2+ years .a very sweet neighborhood kitty. Took him in he needed a home. He looks like Burmese cat and has all the characteristics of one . Well a week ago i noticed a limp in one back leg the next day the other leg and now he is very weak in the back legs. He eats great and does use his box and wants to play but not like he normally does he has to be laying down on his side .he is at the vet now. Has to be sedated cause he will not let anybody touch his back side. I did ok all the normal tests to be done but i think i know what the answer will be. I hope i am wrong. I was up most of the night reading you postcard learned a lot. Printed out the article that rybread shared and i am taking it to the vet wjem i pick up midnight today.because she said she will not give him potassium she said it will kill the cat .she will do the test but if not lol she will not give it to him. It worked for you guys. Now did you get your vet to just agree to it.help i love this little guy and want him healthy and back to normal. By the way this all started after i gave him his 3rd mo treatment of revolution. Never again

goldilockks
July 6th, 2013, 07:39 AM
Hi,

Have you figured out anything new since you posted? My cat is having the exact same problem. He is only 10 months old and he has been healthy until the last week. At first I thought he was just imbalanced because he seemed to be swaying when he walked, he tipped over if I pet him, he tried to jump up on the table, missed, and fell on his back, etc. I thought maybe it was an inner ear problem so I brought him to the vet as soon as I noticed the problem.

The doctors at the clinic were stumped as they could not figure out what was wrong with him. They tested his glucose levels and said he doesn't have diabetes which oftentimes causes a cat's hind legs to be weak. They took x-rays and there were no bony abnormalities. He also did not have a heart murmur, his lungs were fine, and she checked out his ears, nose, and mouth which all looked fine. She said the pieces weren't fitting together and they just didn't know what was wrong with him. She said the next step would be to do a blood workup.

Right when I got home from the vet I placed my cat in his litter box because he'd been gone for a few hours and I figured he'd need to use it. After I put him in the litter box he started eating the kitty litter! He was eating mouthfulls. I pulled him out of there and put him by his food dish and he just went right back to the cat box and started to eat the litter.

The next morning I found out online that clumping cat litter contains something called sodium bentonite, and when ingested it causes cats to be weak and lethargic. For sure I thought this must be what was wrong with him. Then I started to wonder if he's sick because he's eating his cat litter or he's eating his cat litter because he's sick.

I went to the store and got the Cat's Pride brand of litter which states on the container it contains no sodium bentonite and is able to be flushed down the toilet. I read somewhere online that since sodium bentonite clogs pipes, imagine what it does to your kitty's intestines.

As soon as I filled the litter box with the new litter, my cat proceeded to eat the litter again. Since it didn't contain the sodium bentonite I wasn't AS worried, but I decided to go back to the store and get the Feline Pine brand, which is supposed to be completely safe and 100% pine, so it's okay if they ingest it, and it's able to be flushed down the toilet, etc. I haven't put the new litter in the box yet but I plan on doing so tonight.

I've read online that cats might eat their litter because they are lacking something in their diet. One source I found said that cats might eat their cat litter if they are calcium deficient or if they are anemic. I haven't had the blood test done yet so I don't know if it's either of these things. Another thing I read is that being anemic is probably caused by an underlying issue. I'm really hoping there isn't a serious problem with my kitty. I've only had him 6 months and he and my dog are best friends. I would be devastated.

I wasn't able to call the vet today and tell them about him eating his litter because they are closed. I left a message for the vet to call me back so I will be able to talk to her tomorrow.

One more thing I want to add that sounds completely crazy is that when we moved into this house 6 months ago, for some reason there was a small cinder block sitting on the floor in between the washer and dryer and nobody picked it up. I'm not sure why we just left it there but my boyfriend noticed, I'm not sure how long ago it started, that our cat was licking the cinder block. I'm wondering if maybe he does have some sort of deficiency and his eating the litter and licking the cinder block were giving him something he needs. We just threw the block outside recently and soon after is when he got sick. I'm not sure if he just started eating the kitty litter right after we threw the block outside but I've never noticed him doing it in the past. I have no idea if that makes any sense but I don't want to completely throw out that detail in case there's something important about it. I haven't told the vet about this yet because I feel kind of stupid saying I let my cat lick this cinder block for who knows long and didn't bother to throw it out.

Briana, have you ever noticed your cat eating litter? Even though his legs seem weak does he still seem alert and like everything is functioning properly except his legs, or does he appear sick overall?

Sorry this was so long but I wanted to give you as much information as possible. Maybe we can help each other along and let each other know if we find anything else out. Is there anything else you can share about your cat that might be helpful? Any similarities to my story?

Thanks!

My cat is going throught the exact same thing ( eating litter, walls etc.) lost balance and is now almost paralyzed in the front legs, can you please tell me what happened with your cat?

RUSTYcat
July 6th, 2013, 12:05 PM
My cat is going throught the exact same thing ( eating litter, walls etc.) lost balance and is now almost paralyzed in the front legs, can you please tell me what happened with your cat?

Hi goldilocks and welcome to the forum.

I believe that you are probably frantically searching for an answer to a so-far-undiagnosed issue with your kitty.....

Please read carefully what I'm going to say........

First of all, the answer to what happened to Remy21's cat is found within this thread.....a more careful read would have revealed it to you...I'm NOT criticizing YOU, though.....I've been in the same position as you, and, more than once. From those experiences, I would say to you that it's very dangerous to draw any conclusions from other cats' outcomes. Now, read that again: "from conclusions from other...outcomes".

So, you should not draw any conclusions about your cat's health from what may/may not have happened to another person's cat.

What could be helpful and beneficial is pinpointing and listing your cat's specific symptoms - and

pursuing each for potential causations

looking for "clusters" among that list which could be indicative of a disease/condition

Sometimes there are clues from other cases which may help - most other times, similar symptoms are purely coincidental.

So, if you want, we could engage with you - NOT to play 'amateur Vet' - but to help you consider possible issues which you could then bring forward to the people treating your cat.

Do you want to first tell us your cat's story (age, breed, medical history, first symptoms of the current problem, treatment to date)?

That would be a good starting point.

Just as a BTW.....is there a Vet University/teaching school where you are? Can you find out where your Vets are trained?

BeeKeeps
July 18th, 2013, 03:31 PM
So, I've read the entire thread and am still confused as to what to do. My cat is 14 and, besides kidney stones surgery at age 5, has been healthy all of her life. She's an indoor cat and looks to be most similar to a grey calico. About 8 months ago, she got outside unbeknownst to me and was outside the entire night until I finally found her the next morning.

When I found her, her back legs were giving out on her badly. I took her to the vet where she was given a pain shot and I was told that because of her age, she could take some time to recover. They did xrays, blood work, and everything looked fine. No broken bones, all her organs were working properly, her blood work was fine. The vet said it looked like she may have overextended her joints, maybe trying to jump too high. I did find her in the neighbors patio where she had to craw really low to get underneath the fence. I know she crawled because she is adopted and has been declawed. I thought maybe she had overextended trying to get to an area that felt safe to her.

It's been almost 8 months and on and off again visits and talks with the vet as to what's going on with her. It's not diabetes. She doesn't seem to be in pain even after multiple physical examinations. The past month or so she has dropped down to 5 pounds. She has always weighed 6-7 pounds as she is a small cat and was thought to be the "runt" of the litter. The vet has always said that that was a healthy weight given her size, but that 5 pounds was starting to feel the bones and she'd like to see her gain weight. She suggested kitten dry food as it is high in calories, so I put her on that. She's been eating it fine for about 3 weeks, but no signs of significant gain. She continues to drink, eat, urinate, and use her litter box normally. She's still playful at times, but mostly just lays around and is wobbly when trying to make turns.


The vet prescribed a steroid this past week to increase her appetite and also to try and help her legs. She hasn't taken well to the medicine and vomits shortly after taking it.

Now, moving to the nutrition issue. She is a dry food cat, always has been. I tried some wet food with her this week and she ate all of it. I've noticed that she is strangely curious about the new caulking that was put in my bathroom last week and has been licking it. I haven't heard back from my vet on what the next step should be given that she isn't taking to the steroid.

I'm thinking I will try her on a wet food diet and see how she does. She also loves dry cat treats, but I wasn't aware just how awful dry food was for cats. Maybe this will help. I'm just not sure what other options are out there. My vet seems to be puzzled as much as I am.

Any suggestions?

BeeKeeps
July 19th, 2013, 10:25 AM
Just an update, my vet's attempt at making my cat more comfortable wasn't really answering my questions as to what was really going on with her. They were pursuing answers, but nothing was settled upon and I've been directed to see a specialist to find out what's really going on. Infection was ruled out due to the fact that she hasn't been running a fever and the wobbly legs has been persistent.

I've been directed to the nearest University specialists, which is about an hour away, for an MRI. My vet says all signs may be pointing to a cyst or cancer, perhaps in the spinal area. My questions was, how is it cancer when it's something that happened overnight? But she said the stress or an injury could trigger it.

She has gained back a pound in the past month, but still feels too thin. Around her back hip area seems sallow or sunken inward, but that could be the weight loss. She's always had a long back that dipped a bit as well.

I'm at a loss. It seems like my option is to get an MRI to find out what's really going on or see if a steroid will make her more comfortable and hope that it's just something that will fix itself. I don't care to just sit by and guess. Any idea how much a cat MRI costs or thoughts about what may be wrong?

Thanks

hazelrunpack
July 19th, 2013, 10:38 AM
If you call the University clinic they should be able to tell you the costs. They might even be able to eMail you a schedule of fees.

We've had very good luck with University clinics--they see so many more difficult cases than a regular vet would. Well worth the 2-3 hour drive to get there.

I hope you get a diagnosis and treatment options soon! There's nothing worse than not knowing what's going on... :grouphug:

growler~GateKeeper
July 20th, 2013, 12:59 AM
They did xrays, blood work, and everything looked fine.

Was the thyroid hormone level tested? Often listed as T4 or Thyroxine.

Did you get a copy of the bloodwork?

The vet said it looked like she may have overextended her joints, maybe trying to jump too high.
...........
She doesn't seem to be in pain even after multiple physical examinations.

Were the joints out of place at all?
Does it seem to come & go like the joints have popped in & out?

I've noticed that she is strangely curious about the new caulking that was put in my bathroom last week and has been licking it.

Please ensure she no longer has access to the bathroom with new caulking, who knows what kind of harmful chemicals are in that stuff. :yuck:

Sometimes when cats start licking things they shouldn't (concrete, litter etc) it's a sign of anaemia or a calcium imbalance, could also be a weird liking to the taste :yuck:.

As for nutrition at this point I'd be inclined to feed whatever she will eat to ensure she doesn't lose any more weight, however a higher quality protein based wet food will be the best option.

Barkingdog
July 20th, 2013, 08:56 AM
Just an update, my vet's attempt at making my cat more comfortable wasn't really answering my questions as to what was really going on with her. They were pursuing answers, but nothing was settled upon and I've been directed to see a specialist to find out what's really going on. Infection was ruled out due to the fact that she hasn't been running a fever and the wobbly legs has been persistent.

I've been directed to the nearest University specialists, which is about an hour away, for an MRI. My vet says all signs may be pointing to a cyst or cancer, perhaps in the spinal area. My questions was, how is it cancer when it's something that happened overnight? But she said the stress or an injury could trigger it.

She has gained back a pound in the past month, but still feels too thin. Around her back hip area seems sallow or sunken inward, but that could be the weight loss. She's always had a long back that dipped a bit as well.

I'm at a loss. It seems like my option is to get an MRI to find out what's really going on or see if a steroid will make her more comfortable and hope that it's just something that will fix itself. I don't care to just sit by and guess. Any idea how much a cat MRI costs or thoughts about what may be wrong?

Thanks

My daughter has a rescue cat and he was not able to move his hind legs , he had to drag his body around. The vet could not find out what trigger his. The only everyone could think of that the cat had to had an old injury no one knew about. He did get better , I do not remember the meds the cat had to take but he got better and so far been OK . We think the cat may had jumped off his cat tree and landed the wrong way.

Twocents
August 7th, 2013, 03:23 AM
Other possible causes for hind end weakness when diabetes has first been ruled out (I apologize if these have already been mentioned. If they have, I overlooked them):

1. Flea products - even if they came from another pet, especially a dog. Cross contamination or direct application of over-the-counter flea products have been know to cause all kinds of issues, including neurological ones. To prevent, do not use OTC products on any pets in household, only ones from vet clinic. Let vet know if this might be a cause.

- More info, emergency what to do, how to report... - http://www.hartzvictims.org/

- Neurological issues developed after OTC flea products used - www.TinyTimmy.org

2. Convenia injectable antibiotic (or generic equivalent) - has been shown to cause problems like anemia and death in some pets, even those who have had it before. It's not even an appropriate antibiotic to use for dental procedures. See Dr. Pierson's info - http://catinfo.org/?link=convenia

- Also see FB page - "Convenia adverse reactions in cats/felines and dogs/canines" - http://on.fb.me/174b1Sz

- Avoid Convenia by telling vet before any procedure & put it in pet's chart since some will give it without consulting you first (College of Veterinarians of Ontario disciplined a vet and noted they should not give it without a consent and for using it for off-label reason - on a Guinea pig. The pet died.)

- FDA notes what Convenia is not suitable to treat - http://noconvenia.com/#Uses
- Emergency - What to do if Convenia is Used by Your Veterinarian for an Off-Label Purpose - http://noconvenia.com/#ACT

3. Steroid use can cause cats to become diabetic with symptoms of hind leg weakness, so it's good to re check that. Ideally your vet should also have a blood glucose meter in the clinic. Even a hand held one (they normally read slightly lower than the lab test).
- Example of such a cat - http://www.mypawsitivelypets.com/2013/01/steroid-induced-diabetes-in-cats.html#.UgHuYZK1GSo

Note - Diabetic cats can often be made well again and go into remission (get off insulin), but it's easier to prevent it in the first place by feeding low carb canned foods. Our cat vet confirmed that many vets are not familiar with how to achieve diabetic remission. Dr. Pierson's Diabetes info - http://catinfo.org/?link=felinediabetes

- Low carb or a balanced raw diet can reduce or eliminate inflammation so steroids may never be needed. http://feline-nutrition.org/one-page-guides

- Short article by Dr. Gaskin why so many cats end up diabetic - http://msvets.com/FelineDiabetes.html

- Diabetic Cats in Need can assist people in Canada and the USA with diabetic cats and help prevent cats from being euthanized. Financial and other assistance may be available. - http://fdmb-cin.blogspot.ca/

lovekitties
August 19th, 2013, 06:44 AM
Hi all,
this is my first time posting here although i have followed many threads on various occasions. One of my cats is showing symptoms which are similar to many posted in this thread. I have outlined symptoms below.
Beekeeps seems to have the same issue too with her cat, I wonder whether there has been any development?

Our vet is stumped and cannot suggest anything constructive. We should be doing a test for Thyroid soon to check for that too.

SYMPTOMS AND INFO:
My cat has been very weak on the hind legs, walking as though his is dizzy. He loses his balance easily. He is lethargic most of the time and barely has the strength to walk around. He eats reluctantly most of the time and i have to hand feed him to entice him to eat. He kind of 'stares' very often with a dead gaze...
He moans when i pick him up. He does enjoy being brushed... I suspect he doesn't have the energy to groom himself. He seems to have dandruff too now.

He has just started shaking today... hind legs and also his head :( I cannot comment about his litter usage as I have 3 cats.

His bloodwork is all fine, no sign of diabetes either. Thyroid hasn't been tested yet.
He eats wet food, mostly canned Whiskas as he doesn't like much else. Sometimes he accepts to eat the raw food that I feed my other cats. Now he is eating canned tuna sometimes.
He has lost quit a bit of weight too :(

We can't determine his age as he was adopted as an older cat. He is definitely older than 5yrs. He does go out, but not very far, mostly in surrounding gardens or small field next door.

We vaccinated him a few months ago [vet thinks this might be a cause] and recently had to sedate him to take his blood to be tested. The sedation had a very strong impact on him - it knocked him out very much.

He had one good day last week - more energy and he even jumped onto a low wall! That was the only day and after that, back to usual.

We are in constant contact with out vet who is baffled by this.

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

Thank you!

BeeKeeps
August 19th, 2013, 11:54 AM
An update on my cat. I took her off the steroid that the vet gave b/c she was throwing it up. The vet basically said she prescribed it to hopefully make her more comfortable. It just seemed like they were throwing darts in the dark at that point and my cat didn't seem to be in pain from her visits to the vet and their assessment.

The only other thing I didn't mention in my previous posts was that she sometimes has a slight shaking in her front legs when she's sitting straight up. She's always sort of had these nervous, jumpy twitches though since she was a kitten. She tends to get them when she is focused on something or excited and playing. I'm not sure if that means anything or if that's normal. I just thought it worth mentioning since my vet has throne the "neurological" word around as of late.

I'm not quite sure what else to do, honestly. Other than spend thousands to get a scan or make a specialist appointment to have them guess at what it is. She's still slowly putting a few ounces back on. I have since been feeding her low card, dry kitten food for increased caloric intake. After reading this board, I've tried to introduce wet food into her diet. I bought a low-carb wet food and an all-protein, natural wet food. I give her half a can twice a day and make sure that it is slightly warm. At first, she was just licking the juices off of it, but has since taken to first licking off the juice, leaving the dish for an hour, then eating what's left. If anyone has any suggestions on how to get her to eat more, please let me know. My main concern now is getting her weight back up. Please, take into consideration that she is 14 years old, so weight loss is somewhat expected in the later years, but she has definitely lost some due to whatever it is that has happened to her.




Below are answers to some previous questions:

>>Was the thyroid hormone level tested? Often listed as T4 or Thyroxine.

I'm not sure. I will have to contact the vet, but they said they ran a "full test" on her. I would hate to assume thyroid was included and wasn't. What is the significance to this in regards to her back legs? Would it not show up in blood work as well? I know the thyroid pretty much connects to all organs, but she has definitely had a run on organ work and everything checked out according to the vet.

>>Did you get a copy of the bloodwork?

It's on file and I'm planning on getting her records this week. I'm seeking a second opinion on her condition.

>>Were the joints out of place at all?

The vet didn't mention popped-out joints. She said they were over-extended a bit, but she didn't see anything in addition.

>>Does it seem to come & go like the joints have popped in & out?

It doesn't really come and go. Some days it seems definitely worse, or when she tries to move in a particular direction. One side seems worse than the other I've noticed. Her back left leg seems to turn in a bit as if she's found the most efficient way to walk with whatever is ailing her. It's not noticeable to anyone probably, but I notice it.

>>Please ensure she no longer has access to the bathroom with new caulking, who knows what kind of harmful chemicals are in that stuff. :yuck:

She has stopped licking weird things, thankfully. She has always, always loved to chew on photos though since she was a kitten.

>>Sometimes when cats start licking things they shouldn't (concrete, litter etc) it's a sign of anaemia or a calcium imbalance, could also be a weird liking to the taste :yuck:.

She hasn't been licking anything else thankfully.

>>As for nutrition at this point I'd be inclined to feed whatever she will eat to ensure she doesn't lose any more weight, however a higher quality protein based wet food will be the best option.

I have bought a combination of natural, low grain kitten food since the vet suggested kitten food for increased caloric intake and since she is used to dry food. BUT I have been giving her canned food daily. She was reluctant at first and just licked the juice off of it. Now she seems to be eating more of it. I bought her a low carb wet food and a no grain, natural wet food. I'm hoping to move her off of the dry and get her on high protein.

BeeKeeps
August 19th, 2013, 12:02 PM
Also, it's worth mentioning again that this ailment occurred after my cat got outside one night. I finally found her and whereas one day she was fine, afterwards she has had issues with mobility in her back legs. She is clumsy in the back, unable to really jump up high anymore, and just seems to struggle all together. Sometimes it's not as bad as other times.

One thing that I've thought about that causes neurological issues is toxoplasmosis. Has anyone had any encounters with this in cats? The only reason I suggest it is because she got outside and has always been an indoor cat. If she came in contact with something that night, she may have gotten it. Any ideas?

demonicek
August 22nd, 2013, 07:12 AM
prosimte muzes mi poslat na sebe kontakt, diky
Hello from Prague, Czech Republic. We have been fighting with exactly the same symptoms of my cat (7 months old male) for past two weeks. The cat can't walk, he is pulling his rear legs. No fever, he eats the cat litter sand, hiding away and he is very drowsy. We tried everything, antibiotics (quite a few of them), corticoids, steroids with no results whatsoever. He is not getting better or worse. The vet did the ELISA FIP test which turned positive. I do not trust this test. We have one more cat that had similar problems the vet did the same FIP test and recommended euthanasia. We did not do it, the cat healed and haven't had any problems since then (>2.5 years). Recently we have found that cat had ascarides worms (to our surprise as we use the Stronghold regularly and he does not have access outside of our apartment). I had quite an argument with the vet as he was diagnosing the FIP from the test only (the cat has no other usual FIP symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea, fever etc.). The vet also said that this might be a blod block or neurological issue combined with the worms (ascarides). I'll keep you updated regarding our progress.

hazelrunpack
August 22nd, 2013, 03:35 PM
Hi, demonicek. Unfortunately, zsvoboda hasn't signed on since February of 2008. Are you having similar problems with your cat?

BeeKeeps
September 13th, 2013, 09:46 AM
I hope everyone hasn't dropped off of this board. I feel there are so many questions still lingering. I've been doing more investigating as I hate to be stumped and want to know why all of the sudden my cat couldn't walk correctly and was losing weight. It's almost been a year and no one has been able to tell me what happened.

An article came out today about information regarding Chris McCandless' death (the young that had ventured out alone to Alaska and was found dead near the bus he inhabited... in the early 90s I believe). Something got me questioning plant neuro toxins, which is what they believe ultimately caused Chris' body to degenerate. Has anyone ever encountered plant neurotoxins in their pets? It got me wondering.

My cat has an infatuation with eating anything and everything plant-wise that is green. I have to watch her every time I let her out on the back patio or make sure all greenery is put up. It made me wonder if maybe she got into something that night she escaped. Thank you internet, but I found that the sweet pea plant grows around my house and was growing that time of year...and is very toxic to humans and animals. All of the symptoms were ones that my cat was having.

Everlasting Pea. (Common names include Sweet Pea, Perennial Pea). Toxic to cats, dogs and horses. Signs of poisoning include Weakness, lethargy, pacing, head pressing, tremors, seizures and possibly death. It is also very common for the hind quarters in animals that are exposed to this plant to become significantly weakened, making it difficult to walk. Weight loss is also a symptom.


She has certain tremors or shakes it looks like in her legs and her hind quarters seem to be the ones suffering the most. She experienced weight loss for the first time in her 14 years right after that night. Her legs were very faulty that morning after as well. I don't know if symptoms should show up that soon, but I wanted to see if anyone had any thoughts.

Father Goose
September 25th, 2013, 05:14 AM
Hi everyone.
New to this forum and I'm glad that I stumbled upon it! Thank you everyone (a special shout-out to ryebread!) for sharing your experiences & tips.

We have 03 indoor cats which we are fostering. 07-mth old Sasha suddenly developed weak hindquarters about 10 days ago. Sasha has now regained 90% of her strength & 'attitude-ness' and on the road to full recovery (we hope!). Jumps from sofa to sofa without much thought or trouble & starts scratching stuff, climbing & all.... sigh, back to her old self.

Anyway, what she had were the usual symptoms that many here have described. No evidence of physical abnormalities were found on her and we gathered too that she's not in pain (no nastiness/hissing/meowing/struggling when handled).

Tired, lethargic, losing weight fast, not eating well & goes 'splat' whenever she gets down from heights (even low ones). It's really sad to see her like that. We suspect that it had to be her nutrition. They are all fed wet food as their main diet; mainly canned wet seafood with dry food for snacks.

We did not take her to the vet. Vets here wont sell vitamins/supplements to you unless you bring your cat in for consultation etc and where I'm sure they'll run the full gamut of tests. Costs are dear as well.

So, we tried what ryebread suggested (Vit E & Potassium...) before anything else.
More info here>> http://www.vetinfo.com/potassium-supplements-cats.html
Should this fail, its the vet then.

What we did:
1. Do away with dry food.
2. Cut out the seafood
3. Palm fed her a 'feather & fur' diet (mostly chicken flakes w/some thick broth) for her 3 daily meals. Not forcibly.
4. Gave her Nurish-UM Nutritional Supplement (containing Vit E & Potassium; bought off the shelf at a pet store); twice daily; forcibly with a syringe for the first 5 days! Its once a day now. Forcibly still :evil:
5. Let her rest where and whenever she pleases as long as its safe
6. Give lots of care, love, attention & affection!
7. Pray (yes!)

Its been a week today since we started her on this 'diet'. Things are looking pretty good so far. Her right hind leg points slightly inward when she walks though but I'm certain in time to come it'll be back to normal.

But now she prefers ONLY CHICKEN!!! :shrug:

Father Goose
October 10th, 2013, 06:59 AM
UPDATE:

Sasha has made a full recovery! :)
We've stopped the supplements & varied her diet to chicken, meat & seafood (canned cat food).
And leave dry food around all day for snacks.

klbt
March 3rd, 2014, 08:57 PM
i had to register to express my thanx here.
To cut a long story short, my cat, a Napoleon, actually suffered similar symptoms.

Occurred in 2 phases
1) First phase, lose of strength in limbs treated and recovered with potassium supplements
2) Actually thought all is well and cut down on potassium doses, resulting in a relapse bordering on paralysis limbs down, after 2 weeks of potassium sups again, i had him running as per yesterday

I'm wondering if the supplements will be required lifelong in his instances?

RUSTYcat
March 4th, 2014, 12:39 PM
Welcome to the forum, kibt !

First off, I hope that you are NOT playing amateur-googleing-veterinarian !

You will need a competent feline Veterinarian....I have no idea where in the world you are, so it's difficult to give you specific direction on that front...if there is a cat-only Vet or clinic accessible to you, that would be a good place to start.

With a competent Vet on board, it is helpful if we, ourselves, have an general understanding of the issue - in this case (apparently) potassium levels in cats - that is something many people can absorb from this plain-language coverage of the topic: All About Potassium (link) (http://www.felinecrf.org/potassium.htm#low_potassium) (For now, ignore the fact that this site is focused on kidney disease....the general principles covered there apply to all small cats)

Hope those two suggestions are helpful !

klbt
March 12th, 2014, 04:08 AM
Thank you for your advices, in no way would i want to depend on google for the answers. I'm currently residing in China because of work, and sad to mention, the medical scene and in specific for cats are lacking over here. For example. there aint any DNA testing for animals over here.

I had been discussing with my vet and he has yet to come across similar symptoms, and he had given the go ahead to try the potassium supplements as he dont see any harm if given in proper doses.

Welcome to the forum, kibt !

First off, I hope that you are NOT playing amateur-googleing-veterinarian !

You will need a competent feline Veterinarian....I have no idea where in the world you are, so it's difficult to give you specific direction on that front...if there is a cat-only Vet or clinic accessible to you, that would be a good place to start.

With a competent Vet on board, it is helpful if we, ourselves, have an general understanding of the issue - in this case (apparently) potassium levels in cats - that is something many people can absorb from this plain-language coverage of the topic: All About Potassium (link) (http://www.felinecrf.org/potassium.htm#low_potassium) (For now, ignore the fact that this site is focused on kidney disease....the general principles covered there apply to all small cats)

Hope those two suggestions are helpful !

Kris35
April 2nd, 2014, 06:07 PM
I was researching online and came across this string over the last few days of doing my own online research... My cat has a lot of the same or similar issues as stated here. He first wasn't walking with his tail upright, then he wanted to be next to me, and was shaking. Rapidly, he stopped walking and didn't want to use his hind legs. He was in obvious pain and let me know. Took him to vet, then emergency vet, etc. X-Rays, blood work, antibiotics, prednisone, pain meds, enema, etc... was performed. I added in more supplements, he eats a fabulous diet...Nobody could find anything wrong. He was in pain constantly, crying whenever he had to move. I had to bring him food and water, he would eat. He would drag himself to the litterbox which I set his petbed next to, when I couldn't lift him to it when I wasn't home.

Then, my primary vet wanted to use a laser. I would try anything at this point, it was awful to hear him cry with pain, and see him like that. As long as he didn't walk on his hind legs, he was okay laying on his side. So, he had a few minutes of laser across his mid to lower spine area. I packed him up and brought him home to his petbed. They were suspecting some kind of trauma or injury to spine area which affected legs... I will try anything!

When I opened the crate, he walked out, walked around (kind of fumbling a little) and seemed bright, happy, meowing with joy and chatty with me. He sat down, then got up went to his litterbox to use it, then walked around me for a few, then went to his bed to lay down. I am blown away! Who knew? I wanted to make sure I got the word out, as I was stumped at what was wrong with him and nothing helped him. He is still uncomfortable, and I have several more appointments for laser. It's obvious he now has some kind of injury which could take weeks and weeks to heal up. The laser I believe from what I saw today will help and assist with moving along his healing.

I want to be sure that I registered so I could post to this forum, to bring awareness that this is one more thing to possibly ask your vet or try! I have HOPE and I am happy!!! We'll see over the coming weeks!


Hi CAtWalking, I wondered if you were still around? I'm so glad youposted about the cat laser thing. My darling 16 year old cat was jumping up trees (a running launch) just a few months ago but suddenly lost the use of her rear legs. It was awful. I had to take food and water to her - vets didnt know what was wrong until my primary vet said it was arthritis. I just do not accept this. She gave me Metacam and then we both agreed if it didnt work, we would ahvew her pts. Then I started researching online. Long story short - I took her off the Metacam and took her to see a homeopathic vet. The vet gave her a small session (two minutes) of laser therapy and she takes arnica tablets. She is now running up the stairs!! I wanted to ask you for an update. I want to get it out there also that laser therapy might be an option for cats with weak hind legs.


Thanks,

Kris

Kris35
April 2nd, 2014, 06:12 PM
Moomin, my Burmese cat (the one who is now running up the stairs) suddenly got a stronger voice and started to be really demanding (asking for me to do this and that lol). Very odd!!

Crazy Cat Mom
April 9th, 2014, 11:28 PM
You said your cat is walking like he's drunk & tipping over? I experienced this dame sudden onset with 2 different cats within a few years time. In both instances it was a stroke. No cause was ever determined as borh cats were relatively young (5 & 7) and very healthy & active & indoor only. It came on suddenly, one while sleeping the other while sitting on a chair gazing out the window. Sadly, for us, the only option was euthanasia because cats do not recover. I wish you well with your cat & pray for a curable cause for his problem.

Kris35
April 16th, 2014, 04:30 PM
Hi CCM, thanks for your reply and so sorry to hear about your cats. But fortunately, my cat has had a miraculous recovery. I can only put it down to an alternative vet who gave her laser therapy, or if not that, well, I really ahve no idea. My girl is running around and being her usual demanding self again. Unbelievable as I really thought she wouldn't recover. So happy!!

wbaccus
September 27th, 2014, 02:06 PM
We found this thread useful when researching the issues with our kitten.

After months and months of visits and several bouts of periodic near lameness in our 1 year-old Siberian, we finally got the right diagnosis, and it's something that I haven't yet seen mentioned in this thread.

Background
Mallow came to us at 10 weeks old, and was doing a lot of sneezing early on. He also had some eye discharge.

At around a month in, we noticed that his gait was a bit off, which progressed into him walking low to the ground and then to the point where he would just take 3 or 4 steps and then stop.

We took him to the vet, where he got some anti-biotics and pain medicine and an x-ray. Everything looked fine and they couldn't explain it. He got better gradually and was back to 100% after about 10 days.

About 4 weeks later, his 2nd eyelid got irritated and the whole process began again. He went downhill until he couldn't walk.

Other issues we've seen: he can't handle dry food well. He tries to swallow it whole, but ends up spitting it back up and then eating it when it's softer.

We took him to a surgical specialist and the had no diagnosis for us.

The vet also pointed out that he was dealing with stomatitis and was telling us to consider having his teeth pulled.

We were pretty much ready to do that when we figured out the real issue on our own.

We contacted the breeder and she asked her own vet and within 24 hours he had a possibility: FCV (calicivirus).

Our vet discounted the idea, but we asked him to test for it. The test involved putting him under while he scraped the back of his throat, and scraped under his eye, so it's not something that can be done with a simple blood test.

Mallow is up to date on vaccinations, so he HAS been vaccinated for FCV, but he still has it anyway, so if you have a cat with these symptoms, make sure to have them test for FCV.

Kris35
September 27th, 2014, 03:01 PM
I had forgotten about this forum until I just got a notification for this thread. Glad your cat is ok now wbaccus. Its important we get this info out there isnt it - I find vets haven't a clue about some issues.

Jascat
November 30th, 2014, 12:21 AM
Hello everyone,

I am so glad to have found this site as it has let me know that I am not alone when it come to this illness. Today I noticed that my otherwise healthy 7mth old kitten could not hardly walk on her hind legs. It's as if the right foot is hurting and she seemed to flintch whenever she tried to walk on it causing her to limp. I didn't think much of it at first, until I went to the store and when I returned home it seemed she was flinching on the left foot, and as I watched her walk more she started actling like she her front paw were hurting too. This is when I started wondering if she had been hurt when I went to bed the night before, but how and with what. After I fed her, she used her litter box and then she made her way to my bedroom and got up on the bed and went to sleep. She stayed in there well through dinner and I had to go get her out of the bed and take her to her food bowl. She did eat, dry food and then she went back to my room for more sleep. I pray that she is better tomorrow as I recently got her dry cat food today, that she had ran out of. I did not have anything for her to eat on yesterday, so I fed her ham. Now after reading this site and doing a little more google digging I've found that ham is bad for cats in large quanitities. I'm prayerful that getting her back on her regular diet she will snap out of the lethargy and her limbs will heal and she will be her usual playful self. Till the morning that's all I can do. Thank you for being here, I will monitor her progress over the next couple of days and report back.

Thank you all.