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How many would adopt a blind dog?

badgerdogbren
December 29th, 2007, 02:27 PM
I am trying to get an idea of who would adopt a blind dog and what would stop most from this kind of adoption? I would love to hear your thoughts and what your greatest concerns are? I rescue and re-home blind Doxies and of course have a VERY difficult time finding homes for them. Most people think it would be very hard to own a blind dog but in reality there is very little I do differently for the blind dogs as the seeing dogs. Maybe if more people knew how easy it is they would think differently. The blind foster doxie I have now was actually dropped off at the Vet to be put to sleep since the owner felt no one would want him since he went blind and he did not want him either. I just don't get it because this little guy is sweet and loving, potty trained and sits and shakes hands and is happy to warm my lap each evening. We are at our limit for sanctuary dogs so we need to find Joey a loving home. Thank you for sharing your thoughts and concerns in order to help us with his adoption.
Harmony Hounds Rescue/Sanctuary
Amelia, VA

Frenchy
December 29th, 2007, 02:34 PM
I would if I had only 1-2 dogs . I tried to adopt one last year , an abused , older Rottweiler , was blind in one eye and barely could see from the other. The rescue thought it would be best to place her in a home where there was less pets (I had 2 dogs + foster dogs + 1 cat at that time)

That is great that you are rescuing these dogs :thumbs up

want4rain
December 29th, 2007, 02:44 PM
if our children were older we would happily adopt a blind dog. i know several couples who are very routine based who would. they dont have children though. i think that would be a big deal, as with what Frenchy said, kids and too many other dogs (although i think too many other dogs would be much easier on a blind dog than kids!!!)

i would think that having another calm dog in the house would be a good thing. someone else who speaks 'dog' who can communicate with the blind one. id be interested in finding out how blind dogs get along with seeing dogs in a foster situation?? forever home situation? as opposed to living alone.

-ash

SARAH
December 29th, 2007, 04:15 PM
It would certainly make me keep everything in it's place so the blind dog wouldn't bump into things that shouldn't be there! I don't think blindness would stop me from adopting a dog. I've never thought about it before now, but since you threw the question out there ...

I never let the dogs off leash exept in their own back yard anyway, they are always tied when we go for a walk; a blind dog would obviously not be off leash at all, but at the same time I would imagine it being less of a puller since it couldn't see where it was going ? I might have to put a fence around the pool though, unless the smell of the chlorine would keep it away from the edge.

Other concerns ... not really. If a blind person can find their way around in a house, why should a dog be any different? In fact, a dog has a better sense of smell than the human, so orientation should be easier.

Walking that dog, I'd be a seeing-eye-human :laughing: original idea ;)

Probably not a choice I would make with really yong children who might not understand, but that would also depend on the child's personality and degree of maturity.

krdahmer
December 29th, 2007, 06:22 PM
I would definitely consider it. My only concern about adopting a dog is whether or not they could be trusted with and get along with my 6 kitties... but that is a concern blind or not. (and of course have allergies and lack of space to consider for now... but by meeting all the owners here with 'special needs' pets, I think I might actually look for a dog that needs me and may be less likely to find a home out there... )

wdawson
December 29th, 2007, 06:43 PM
i would.....but i'm in frenchy's position....3 dogs and 3 cats.

Byrd
December 29th, 2007, 06:46 PM
Yes, I would for sure.

SnowDancer
December 29th, 2007, 07:34 PM
At what age did the Dachshund turn blind? I ask because my first wonderful guy - who apparently never should have walked - and after suffering through 3 "events" had full neck and back disc surgery in 1988 at the age of 2 1/2 - and 40 days later walked. He was seriously Alpha which is why neuro went with the surgery because of his will to live and strong desire to stay put and keep me safe. But no guarantees of course. Several years later he went deaf - he could easily cope with that. On Sept. 12, 1997 he lost his eyesight and also control of his bodily functions - but I think that the eyesight bothered him the most. He was petrified until I touched him - a very in-control type of guy. So I guess what I am saying is that it would so much depend on the circumstances. He was 11 when it happened - no one ever thought he would live to be that age - least of all his surgeon. Probably a dog that was born blind and allowed to live would be easier to cope with - never would have seen - or a younger dog. The house sure was empty without him though, despite the other 2 mild mannered Dachshunds we had at the time. And wouldn't you know, but we heard about another guy - an Alpah Dapple who needed a home - we adopted him, the other dogs had a new leader and I had a new soul mate - but at age 6 Stage II disc disease hit and once again full body surgery - this time though, 10 months to the day of his surgery, he paralyzed again and a second surgery was not a health option for him. 7 years and 2 weeks was too young. We now have an Eskimo, but I sure miss my hounds. I commend you for rescuing Dachshunds. I couldn't do it.

ancientgirl
December 29th, 2007, 07:44 PM
What terrible owners to want to have their pet put down just because of blindness.

I don't think it would be any different for a dog than a human to maneuver around a home. Once they were taken around and got used to his surroundings.

If I didn't already have 5 cats, I'd consider it myself. If anything, it's animals who have special needs that really are in need of homes.

luckypenny
December 29th, 2007, 08:39 PM
He was petrified until I touched him - a very in-control type of guy. So I guess what I am saying is that it would so much depend on the circumstances.

I completely agree; it depends on the circumstances and the temperament of the dog, and what a new owner/family is prepared to do to help a dog in this situation.

Our Peanut (RIP) went blind about a year before he died. It did not affect him in the least until he lost his hearing as well near the end...at which time he did snap at anyone who frightened him when he wasn't expecting it.

Our Lucky wasn't born blind but went so in a shelter. No one knew what had caused it and if it was permanent. He was extremely petrified/anxious as well but showed no aggression. After months of following several courses of treatments for intestinal parasites, his sight slowly began to return. We were fortunate. Our children were 10 and 16 at the time and are well behaved around all animals so we weren't concerned. However, if I were to have had toddlers, I may have reconsidered bringing him home :shrug:.

CyberKitten
December 29th, 2007, 08:52 PM
If I did not have 4 cats, I too would not give it that much thought.

Animals, unlike humans , adapt well to what we call a disability. To them, it is just another way of life. Dogs and cats and bunnies too for that matter - manage very well if visually impaired Since their senses are different and the use their sense of smell more than their sense of sight - which is quite different than ours, a visually impaired dog would have certain needs to be sure that are unique but just as we teach humans how to navigate a room without sight, the same is true of animals and it is actually easier and less complicated.

People are much more upset by the loss of one of their key senses. Dogs manage extremely well and can figure out where things are and always know where their people are - and other animals - by their sense of smell. With loving care, extra help and a home made so they can navigate it, it would not be an issue at all.

I;d adopt a visually impared animal in a minute! And be thrilled to be able to do it.

StumpsMom
December 29th, 2007, 09:39 PM
If I was able to...I'd do it in a second. I too, never thought about a blind dog, but I don't know of any reason why not:shrug:

I can't believe the owner wanted to get rid of him because he lost his sight....what a :censored:!

Shaykeija
December 29th, 2007, 09:50 PM
I would in a http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff80/kw_big_bob/heart-15.gif. But our dumb bylaws say I can only have 2 dogs which by the way are smaller than the cat ...LOL

JanM
December 29th, 2007, 09:54 PM
I'm not at all sure I could adopt a blind dog - I'd be terrified when we went out on hikes that the dog wouldn't see or sense danger - a sharp drop-off, whatever and I might miss cueing the dog to it. Since I'm out in the wilderness with my dogs so very much, and doing that is important to me, I would hesitate to say YES I would adopt a blind dog.

Frenchy
December 29th, 2007, 09:58 PM
JanM , for sure you would have to keep the dog on a leash when on walks.

IMO , blind dogs need a quiet family and routine , and to not have someone rearrange furnitures too often. :shrug:

JanM
December 29th, 2007, 11:02 PM
JanM , for sure you would have to keep the dog on a leash when on walks.

IMO , blind dogs need a quiet family and routine , and to not have someone rearrange furnitures too often. :shrug:

True enough but out in the woods, a blind dog would be at a definite disadvantage in the event of a bear or cougar encounter. Which reminds me - we had a cougar "almost encounter" so I'll post that separately...

theplainsjane
December 30th, 2007, 10:11 AM
badgerdogbren: i know some rescue people you know! lorie, barbe--anyhow! i am taking in a blind 6 week old pit bull puppy on monday. i don't know if i'll ever place her, but going to try. this is an interesting thread for me. i'll try to remember to keep everybody posted.

Rottielover
December 30th, 2007, 10:16 AM
You know what, I would in a heart beat. I am not worried about the cats. Dogs use their noses. LOL
My Kayla is a few and far between when it comes to respect for animals at this young age, so a blind dog would be ok in our home.
Would a rescue ever adopt a blind dog to a family with a toddler, most likely not because most kids torment, and the dog has enough to adjust to.

SARAH
December 30th, 2007, 10:24 AM
JanM , for sure you would have to keep the dog on a leash when on walks.

IMO , blind dogs need a quiet family and routine , and to not have someone rearrange furnitures too often. :shrug:

True enough but out in the woods, a blind dog would be at a definite disadvantage in the event of a bear or cougar encounter. Which reminds me - we had a cougar "almost encounter" so I'll post that separately...

Well, you could take the blind dog on separate, safer walks between the houses, where no cougar and bear roam.

I agree with Frenchy to a degree. Calm as in not too much shouting and sudden noises, but not necessarily calm as in nothing happening. Being blind AND bored can't be any fun at all :sad:

Furniture, yes - leave it where it is! In other words, make sure you are happy with your interior before you bring the dog home :D

***

Same by-laws here, max 2 dogs. It says "4 cats, or 3 cats and one dog, or two cats and two dogs" never more than 2 dogs! Isn't that discrimination :frustrated: :shrug: :confused:

14+kitties
December 30th, 2007, 10:26 AM
That's something I have never considered before. I suppose if I was looking for an animal (not at the moment thanks) and I saw one who tugged at my heartstrings, it would not much matter if he/she was blind, had three legs, was deaf, any impairment. I would know that is the one for me.
My biggest problem would be that that would be ALL of the animals that I saw! :o

SARAH
December 30th, 2007, 10:29 AM
I want a property with lots of land and huge, well built barn to keep all the sad abandonned animals in :yell:

Frenchy
December 30th, 2007, 10:33 AM
I agree with Frenchy to a degree. Calm as in not too much shouting and sudden noises, but not necessarily calm as in nothing happening. Being blind AND bored can't be any fun at all :sad:


I didn't mean boring :laughing: I meant not too many people walking around in the house , or running , too much action , blind dogs could get startled easely. That's why I thought I would have been a good home for the abuse , half blind one. But I wasn't thinking about having too many dogs though. :sad: Rottielover knows that Clara , the rott I'm talking about , has find her forever home since :thumbs up

Frenchy
December 30th, 2007, 10:35 AM
But our dumb bylaws say I can only have 2 dogs which by the way are smaller than the cat ...LOL


never more than 2 dogs! Isn't that discrimination :frustrated: :shrug: :confused:

There's no limit in Sherrington :D

Frenchy
December 30th, 2007, 10:38 AM
i am taking in a blind 6 week old pit bull puppy on monday. i don't know if i'll ever place her, but going to try. this is an interesting thread for me. i'll try to remember to keep everybody posted.

Only 6 weeks old ? Poor little puppy. But that young , she will have more chance to get adopted :fingerscr please keep us posted (and maybe someone here would be interested , you could post a pic of her when you get one ) :thumbs up

Rottielover
December 30th, 2007, 11:01 AM
Oh yes sweet Clara, I still get shivers thinking about her. I am so happy she found her forever home, one that rightfully deserves her.

badgerdogbren
December 30th, 2007, 12:24 PM
Thank you for all your comments. It helps to know what most people think when they think of a blind dog. I will say just to clarify that because dogs use the nose and whiskers first they don't run into things like you would think. If I move furniture I just show them once where I moved it then they are fine. I also have a blind/deaf Doxie here. She has no problem getting around at all. Joey does actually pull on the leash and we are working on that. Dogs pull more because of what they smell ahead than what they see. Joey loves his walks in the woods but he is leashed only because he is stubborn at times and his recall is not 100% yet. Our blind/deaf Doxie can with supervision be let loose and she has a ball running with the pack. We have raked a trail through the woods and she knows if she feels leaves crunch under her feet she is to get back on trail or she may run into a tree. She is a smart cookie and has no trouble. She uses her scent ability (a dog's strongest sense) to stay with the pack when in the woods on our walks. In our 4 fenced acres she just runs to her hearts content and has totally memorized the property with no problems. As to small children it totally depends on the children and how the parents have taught the children to respect animals. Our blind/deaf Doxie Noel actually is the most bonded with our 11yr old daughter Kate and Noel adores children and all people. Joey our blind foster also loves children but as with any Doxie he may snap if a small child banged him on the head or pulled his tail. All you have to do before you approach a blind dog is blow a puff of air in their direction to let them know who is going to pet them. They also learn that this puff of air means they will be pet. This eliminates the startle. There are wonderful books out there too that teach you how to live with a blind dog so that you have little to no issues. For any who may consider adoption some day please don't let blindness stop you the blind dogs are wonderful too and deal with this soooooooo much better than humans. Thank you again to all the wonderful loving pet owners out there who responded and helped me out. God bless and Happy New Year!!