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Fed up with Puppy

kerryj
December 28th, 2007, 06:51 PM
Hi. This is my first post. Can anyone help us out? We have a male bichonpoo, age 7 months. He does not pee inside, but he has reverted back to pooping inside (every now and again). He does not ask to go out at the door, so it's hard to know when he has to go. He is VERY aggressive, he has periods of barking, snapping, lunging and biting. We have tried all the "usual" suggestions, including those from the Puppy Classes we completed a while ago. The only thing that works is putting him in his crate for a "time out." But we would like to stop the behaviour without having to go that far. He also gets up on the kitchen table and steals things (including food) and runs all around the house with them. It seems like the more we try to train or discipline him, the more stubborn and aggressive he gets. We are planning to get him neutered soon- does this really calm dogs down, or is that just a myth? Anyone out there with a similar dog, please help!

poodletalk
December 28th, 2007, 07:07 PM
It sounds like your pup is going through his rebilious teen age years.

First, I would suggest that you continue going to dog obidence classes. Also, your whole family must be consistent with the training of your dog and it needs to be practiced regularly not just once in awhile.

Sterilizing your dog WILL help in some matters but it's not a miracle to solve all your problems.

Do you take him out for walks? He needs to be socialized and during the walks you can teach him to walk, sit, stay etc.

Also, when does he go to the bathroom inside the house? Durning the night? In the afternoon? If he goes, during the night feed him his supper earlier and let him outside for longer time. If he goes while you are at work, you must feed his breakfast earlier and let him outside longer.

Frenchy
December 28th, 2007, 07:09 PM
Please don't give up ! For the neutering , it will not do miracles but do calm (a bit !) some dogs , but not all of them. For the pooping inside , I would suggest to take him to see your vet, just to make sure it's not an health problem.

For the behavior issues , this dog sounds like he needs exercise , lots of it. How long do you walk him , how many times a day , how long do you play with him outside ..... the more you do , the more he will be tired and will listen to you and will not feel the need to be :evil:

wdawson
December 28th, 2007, 07:27 PM
This is the worst time of year to get a pup,i know i have a 5 1\2 month jack.
But you have to be consistant with the walks and even short potty breaks.
I'm up at 4:30am take the older dogs for the 2km walk....then the pup goes,and we don't return till business is done,yes even in crappy weather,I think dogs need routine and discipline along with alot of attention,more so as a pup.

please hang in....it will get better with a little work and patience:thumbs up

angeldogs
December 29th, 2007, 01:01 AM
I would continue with OB classes.who did you go through here in Kitchener.
I would give him lots of excercise.and be consistent with your training.if you excercise him and burn off some of his energy.it should calm him down for you to work with him and his training.don't give up.it takes time and patience.
If he starts mouthing don't pull your hand away.that will cause him to lung for your hand.

mastifflover
December 29th, 2007, 02:27 AM
One other thing do not use his crate for time out. It should not be used for punishment otherwise you will create another problem for yourself. The dog will not want to go in his cage because he associates it with being a bad place it should be his safe place. Yes Yes Yes to more obedience training and socializing. The pup must know you are the top dog and what you say he does. Socializing small dogs is really important they can be very snappy and aggressive do not allow it. It is hard work but will be well worth the effort when you have a well behaved dog that you do not have to worry about

CearaQC
December 29th, 2007, 03:26 AM
Puppy-proof your home. Don't let stuff lay around within reach. Anything you don't want destroyed, stolen or eaten, remove or bind out of puppy's way.

Keep him on an umbilical leash inside the home, attached to a human every moment. Make him follow you everywhere, so you are there 100% the time to provide discipline and to keep an eye when he might want to act out or eliminate. When you cannot keep him attached to you in the house and he's already had exercise then put him into the crate. Toss in some toys/kong to keep him occupied while in there.

It's tiring doing the umbilical thing, but it does work. I learned that if you observe behavior closely you will begin to see when the dog thinks about doing something and then you can stop it before it goes any further. My dog will perk up her ears and look intently at the cat, and at that point of the ears perking, I remind/correct that is not acceptable behavior towards the cat, then she gives up.

Get the dog active to use up that extra energy. Once the extra energy has been spent try some training. Otherwise it's like trying to tell a human child what to do when he/she is high on sugar and confined inside the house all day.

Dogs normally need to go potty after waking up from naps/overnight sleep, after playtime and after eating. So, feed/water the dog at specific times of the day and time how long it takes to go through his system and plan potty outings accordingly. When he does go outside, praise him like he just performed a miracle.

SnowDancer
December 29th, 2007, 10:25 AM
Did the pooping inside the house start around the time we started getting snow? We are in Toronto and have an Eskimo and they hate to put their delicate butts down into the snow - they don't seem to care though about doing a full body dive and stuffing their faces with snow though. I would continue with the classes - and I strongly suggest that you limit treat training as much as possible - and also do not leave food out any place that the dog can get it. It doesn't seem to matter if the dog weighs 10 lbs. or 100 lbs., if food is on the table or counter, a smart pup can get it - when we had Dachshunds they were able to get things you wouldn't believe. Our Eskie will turn 3 years, 9 months on Tues. - I am counting the months because Eskies mature late - if ever - and some people I have spoken with have told me that their Eskies lived to be 17 or 20 and were puppies to the end. Nice in some respects, but not in others. I bought myself a book for Christmas that I saw recommended on an Eskie site - it is called "My Smart Puppy" by Brian Kilcommons and Sarah Wilson - I LOVE IT - my guy already knows many of the commands, but what I love about this book is that it explains to you certain unwanted behaviours that you will train your dog to do if you do XXX - and in our case a few of said unwanted behaviours are apparently a result of exactly what my husband has been doing. The book is for puppies and for people who adopt older dogs who need training. There is a DVD included, but it does deal more with the very basics, but good to see a few things. We are doing the "daily dozen" as suggested in the book. Unfortuntely Chapters had not reduced the price to the US equivalent, but then it was the last copy in the store. There are good reviews and bad reviews of this book, but I have to tell you, when my husband is starting to follow suggestions, something is right. I hope things work out for you.

want4rain
December 29th, 2007, 10:38 AM
i didnt read through everyone elses posts, im sure they have fantastic advice!! i just wanted to say YES!!! snipping will have a great deal of an effect, along with time. many of the things you are gooing through right now, be firm, consistent and ride the wave out. one day your dog will just up and decide its much easier to listen to you and be a part of the house than to rebel and be outside of the pack. just keep doing the right thing and give it some time for him to get over whatever hormonal issues you have. we got Mister fixed 'late in life' (ie the 'teen years') and it really helped over the next few months to readjust his attitude.

-ash

kerryj
December 29th, 2007, 01:13 PM
Thanks everyone for the quick replies. To Angeldogs, we went to Puppy Power here in Kitchener. To be honest, I was not overly impressed. The trainer has very quick "one line" answers to your concerns. Finley did learn sit, down, and come through the lessons taught in the classes. We taught him to lay on the floor with all four paws up in the air when we point a finger "gun" and say "bang-bang". I just am so tired and frustrated with this crazy, wild behaviour. He harldy ever wants to be held or cuddled (he usually fights like crazy) and it's so heartbreaking when you wanted a cuddly, warm puppy

angeldogs
December 29th, 2007, 01:31 PM
Hi kerryj.
i went through and work with a trainer here in kitchener.i've had problems with my boy and with her help we've gotten through them.it takes time and patients.they will fight when your trying to make them do something they don't want to do or don't know how.it can get frustrating.but try to stay calm.don't work with if your stressed or frustrated.he will sense that and will act on it.if you remain calm it will be easier to get him calmed down.lots of excerise is the key.puppies have energy to burn.and with out enough they will find other way to expell that energy.chewing etc.

want4rain
December 29th, 2007, 01:38 PM
maybe a NILIF approach is a good idea. make him work for everythign he gets... toys, food, treats and affection. take it all away and only give things to him when he gives you proper behavior. if you feed kibble, that should be very easy. just measure out his daily food and keep it in your pocket. when you are good and ready for it, make him sit or down for food. give him food when he shows you proper affection (NOT when he is being crazy) or is being calm. give him treats for going potty outside or fetching a ball or whatever it is you do with him socially. when he does the crazy bad things, make him sit for food and then give him a toy to play with after a tidbit of food.

-ash

SARAH
December 29th, 2007, 03:32 PM
Hi kerryj.
i went through and work with a trainer here in kitchener.i've had problems with my boy and with her help we've gotten through them.it takes time and patients.they will fight when your trying to make them do something they don't want to do or don't know how.it can get frustrating.but try to stay calm.don't work with if your stressed or frustrated.he will sense that and will act on it.if you remain calm it will be easier to get him calmed down.lots of excerise is the key.puppies have energy to burn.and with out enough they will find other way to expell that energy.chewing etc.

Calm assertive energy :D sounds like what's-his-name on Nat Geo channel, and I know many of you don't like the guy, but at the same time, he's right about that energy thing; as well as exercise to get rid of excess energy and make the dog more receptive to obedience training. Not saying to try the roller blades :eek: but a good walk/run should help!

Frenchy
December 29th, 2007, 04:23 PM
He harldy ever wants to be held or cuddled (he usually fights like crazy) and it's so heartbreaking when you wanted a cuddly, warm puppy

I'm sorry to say this but if you wanted a dog to held and cuddle , you should have adopted an older dog. Puppies are hard work and full of energy that needs to be burn off. Lots of exercise and training. :shrug:

clm
December 29th, 2007, 04:38 PM
Only time my guys are cuddly is if they're asleep. :laughing: When awake my pups have way too much on their mind to want to cuddle.
Frenchy is right, if you wanted a cuddler, an older dog would have been the right choice, not a puppy. Even as adults some breeds aren't cuddlers. I don't know about your pup, but my breed are known for being a little stand offish.

Cindy

wdawson
December 29th, 2007, 04:56 PM
maggie is cuddly.....if you can catch her mid zoomie:laughing:....sorry......it will get better with time,training and patience.....oh and cherish those puppy days....they grow up to fast....again sorry i just love the puppy days,guess i'm :crazy:

Longblades
May 30th, 2008, 06:45 PM
I'm not familiar with your breed but my 7 month old puppy is getting into things he never did before and acting more confident. I attribute much of this to him becoming a teenager and as for getting into things, he is bigger now and anxious to explore areas he could not reach before. I early taught him GIVE so retrieving contraband has not been a problem. I also strictly enforce the NILIF theory. Nothing In Life is Free. I really think it works.

How often is he pooping inside? How long is he left alone? A puppy may not develop complete sphincter control till six months of age and that is just a guideline. Has his diet been changed?

barking, snapping, lunging and biting. At you? That is serious and you cannot let it get out of control. I have no advice other than to seek out an experienced, qualified trainer who can help you.

We are planning to get him neutered soon- does this really calm dogs down, or is that just a myth? Many times it calms dogs down. Not always. There is some research to say bitches are at risk of developing increased aggression problems after spaying. At your puppy's age of seven months I have to wonder if sex hormones can be playing a part yet. I certainly don't think they are with my pup. You should contact your breeder and or your Vet with that question. Even if he is sexually mature at only seven months, neutering may not help. You can ask your Vet about the new drug at this link, http://www.peptech.com/HTML/Animal_Health/Superlorin_general.html which will suppress testosterone so you can evaluate if neutering is going to be of any help. What might end up happening instead is neutering will prevent the develop of male hormone and he will remain forever puppish in outlook and behaviour. The very behaviour you now disagree with. In my breed, Labrador, juvenile behaviour can be expected till about 2 years of age. It might just be that yours is only being a puppy who has been inadvertently allowed to get the upper hand in his family.

PM me if you would like links to research on other pros and cons of neuter/spay.

anna14
June 2nd, 2008, 06:23 PM
How to train your dog to let you know when he needs to go out:
Buy a little bell at a dollar store
Teach him to touch his nose to the bell and make it ring
Immediately after he does this ,take him outside
It will take a while, but be consistent! He will learn that when he rings the bell, he will go outside!
Keep a schedule of potty outings and when you give him his food!

As for the outrage burts:
He needs much more mental stimulation and excercise. Especially when their teenagers! Do go to obedience classes (avoid the choke method) and teach him proper manners!

Good luck and hang in there!

BlueBreeze
June 15th, 2008, 07:52 PM
I took my sheltie to Puppy Power (actually one of her students has her own classes at the same facility) and I wasn't overly impressed. We didn't learn alot in 6 wks.

A good friend suggested McCann's in Dundas for training classes. THey are more expensive, longer duration and worth every penny. My sheltie is very reactive and timid and we've actually done more classes at McCanns. I'm about 45 minute drive and have enjoyed the classes immensely :)

I also took her to a behaviourist because I felt I wasn't making any headway with her lunging and barking at other dogs and people when out walking. She was quite reasonable and I can highly recommend her also if you want.

angeldogs
June 15th, 2008, 09:33 PM
This is an older thread.so i don't know if she seen anyone or not