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Hello - Adding a new puppy to the Family

vjones201
December 4th, 2007, 11:13 AM
Hello,

I'm new to the Forum.

I currently have a one year old toy fox terrier, girl. We want to add a new addition. However, we cannot decided whether to get another girl or maybe a boy. I hear that girls fight alot. I also hear that boys are harder to train. Have also noticed that girls cost a lot more than the boys. I wonder why? Help me decide. We love our pet. Her name is Foxey, and she is the Queen of the house, and we want her to be happy. Which gender would she be happiest with, or is it the luck of the draw.

Thank you

Frenchy
December 4th, 2007, 11:35 AM
Wrong wrong and wrong ! :laughing: It depends more on submissive or dominant , that is what you have to look for, not the dog's sex. As for females being more expensive , you mean the adoption fee ? If someone charges more for a female , I guess it's in the intention of letting the new owner breed her , wich is totally unaceptable.

What type of dog is Foxey , I mean how is she with other dogs ? Would you say she's dominant or submissive ?

Oh and welcome to pets.ca ! :D

LavenderRott
December 4th, 2007, 11:41 AM
IF you plan on spaying your girl, you would most likely be better of getting a male pup.The general "rule of thumb" is that multiple dog households run more smoothly if the dogs are of oposite sex.

We are talking about living, thinking beings however so there are many exceptions to the rule.

If the thought of getting a male and breeding has crossed your mind - please leave that to the ethical breeders. Little dogs have some serious genetic issues that may not be evident in parents but can be passed on to puppies and they also have a harder time during pregnancy and labor.

Frenchy
December 4th, 2007, 11:46 AM
IF you plan on spaying your girl, you would most likely be better of getting a male pup.The general "rule of thumb" is that multiple dog households run more smoothly if the dogs are of oposite sex.



Sorry , I totally disagree. I have more males than females , and most of my fosters are males , never had any problem. Only once , and it was a dominant issue , had nothing to do with gender.

14+kitties
December 4th, 2007, 11:53 AM
I had a Collie/Shepard mix who was a year old when I got my female toy poodle. She was a very gentle lady :rip: and immediately adopted the little one as her own. They got along famously for 12 years until she developed cancer and had to be put to sleep.
I agree with everyone else. It is the dog's temperment, not the sex, that determines if another dog should be added to the mix. Also, toys do have a multitude of health problems bigger dogs do not. Mine suffers from epilepsy which started when she was a year old. Her parents were both perfectly healthy.
Good luck

LavenderRott
December 4th, 2007, 12:01 PM
I understand that you disagree. And that is fine.

Yes, dominance/submissiveness plays an important role. Again, as a general rule a dominant male dog with a stable temperment will do fine with a dominant female dog - so long as you don't start waving around raw bones and such. You are more likely to have problems with a pair of dominant females or a pair of dominant males. LIke I said, it is not written in stone.

vjones201
December 4th, 2007, 12:10 PM
Foxey is neutered, and we are not breeding anything. I'm not sure if she is dominant or not. She has not been around other dogs, and its just my husband and I. We don't know if she is dominant or submissive. We are looking, of course, for a submissive dog. My expected puppy is only 4 weeks. We have a choice of a boy or a girl and at this point, we do not have a clue about their personality traits. I thought we should get a very young dog, so that way Foxey would feel more in charge because she is larger.

We are new dog owners (less than a year). Foxey is a lap dog, very affectionate and somewhat spoiled..

LavenderRott
December 4th, 2007, 12:17 PM
If she has never been around other dogs you may not be able to bring either into your home.

When you go and look at the puppies, take her with you.