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Another Jumper Help Please!!!

white wrabbit
November 10th, 2007, 04:05 PM
well it is official.. Maggie can jump/ climb a 6 foot fence.. she was out side 10 mins unsupervised.. and she jumped it.. i found where she did it.. all the claw marks on the fence and the top lattice is broken a bit...

Just what i need another dog i can't trust to leave in the yard... and her recall was horrible this time i has to chase her down glad she ran in to a fenced yard down the street.. or i would not of been able to catch her and we are suppose to be heading over to mom in laws house for the night.. (good thing i saw her out the window as she walked by down the sidewalk)

now how am i going to trust her in the yard there.. yes she will have another dog or 2 to play with but now i got the what if's.. she has not been there before and it is in the city...

i really don't want to have to tie out another dog again.. and when we go some where have to tie her up cuz of the fence jumping we had to do that with our last dog.. at home yes we can fix it but we can't at mom in laws house.. or any one else's house we take her with us to visit...

Any suggestions for other people houses when we take her.. the dogs play... so they have to play out side no room in her house for it... and i can't leave her home cuz i won't be home till tomorrow evening...

oh and she is a Doberman/ hound cross.. not even a year old yet...

luckypenny
November 10th, 2007, 04:53 PM
Can you not stay outside and supervise while they play?

Luba
November 10th, 2007, 04:56 PM
Hounds will do whatever they can to get out of a yard, dig climb jump. It's their nature...site or scent hound....either way by chasing a bird, squirrel or a scent in the wind.

It's their nature and you won't really be able to train out of that, so I'd say just make sure you're supervising backyard time.

It won't make a difference if there is another dog there, she won't care one bit. But with you there, you can supervise and she will be less likely to take off as you're pack leader and she'll be following your lead. So redirect her by throwing lots of balls, frisbee's while out there.

I wouldn't let a hound off leash or unsupervised unless positively contained. It's genetic, there's no way around it, they're bred to hunt and go non stop no matter what it takes to get to the scent/site of what's caught their attention.

white wrabbit
November 10th, 2007, 05:16 PM
most time when at home she goes out with me when i have a smoke and comes in with me this time she was playing with her ball so i left her outside to play with it. (we don't smoke in the house) but when we are at some ones house there is too much going on in side the house family gathering or tonight my mother in law is baby sitting my 3 kids and the dog while sister in law and i go to a concert... i think her dog will be enough for now to keep her in the yard this time.. but now i am worried i wasent before she did this today.. oh and i got the fenced fixed in the spots where she could go under and where she did the other day.. (my fault that day for sleeping in)

to think i have this huge yard and i have to tie her up in it for the next month till i can get hubby to put back up the angled fence part we had before.. my mother in law has this huge yard as well.. my old dog never played with her dog but she does same high energy as Maggie and wants to play...

but i do know this Christmas she will have to spend some of that at home with the other issue we have to work slowly on with her.. one man at a time you could call it.. she is afraid of men and barks and growls at them..

Luba
November 10th, 2007, 05:21 PM
Don't tie her up just stay out there with her and play with her for awhile, not just while you have a smoke. Have some fun and enjoy her play and get some air into your own lungs. Make it an enjoyable thing not a chore!

I see in your future, shopping for some great balls, soft frisbees and rope!

white wrabbit
November 10th, 2007, 05:41 PM
we do play while i have my smoke.. but after a while she dosent want to play with me:cry: i take her toys and throw them away from her.. gets her running and burns some energy off of her..

kids play tug war with her quite a bit in the house..

i am just more concerned now about other ppls houses.. old blue dog use to get tied till inlaws got new dog then he got to be in the one part of the house to keep them apart from each other.. when we had the gathers but he would jump a baby gate she wont

Lissa
November 10th, 2007, 07:25 PM
Hounds will do whatever they can to get out of a yard, dig climb jump. It's their nature...site or scent hound....either way by chasing a bird, squirrel or a scent in the wind.

It's their nature and you won't really be able to train out of that, so I'd say just make sure you're supervising backyard time.

It won't make a difference if there is another dog there, she won't care one bit. But with you there, you can supervise and she will be less likely to take off as you're pack leader and she'll be following your lead. So redirect her by throwing lots of balls, frisbee's while out there.

I wouldn't let a hound off leash or unsupervised unless positively contained. It's genetic, there's no way around it, they're bred to hunt and go non stop no matter what it takes to get to the scent/site of what's caught their attention.

I completely disagree. Yes some hounds may try to escape but so will ANY breed that is getting inadequate mental/physical stimulation (boredom), sees/smells something, is left unsupervised, has no boundaries etc.... I really hate reading these breed stereotypes - this is the humans fault not the dog's! No dog should be left outside unsupervised - its an accident waiting to happen.

My yard is completely unfenced but my hound is 100% trusted in the backyard when I'm outside or cooking (kitchen overlooks the yard). He is well-exercised, well-trained so there is no reason for him to leave the yard and even if a critter passed by, he could easily be called off (and more than likely wouldn't leave the yard with or without my intervention anyway). :2cents:

Most hounds do not care for retrieving - its really no way to exercise a hound. Even my hound who's been conditioned to think bringing/giving to ME is great (and will fetch anything from coins to food) will only fetch a toy a few times before he loses interest. Using crinkly-noisy sounding lure's (cat teaser's are great) or using a fur toy or rubbing bottled animal scents onto toys can encourage retrieving but it cannot be the only source of physical activity for a hound.

If my memory serves me correctly, you haven't had Maggie very long right??? That could be part of the issue - you are all still learning about each other and forming a bond. Enrolling in OB classes with a good positive reinforcement trainer will do wonders... It will help build a bond, you can work on the men issues and learn how to motivate her (keeping her mind active is just as important as physical activity)...
With regards to her not "wanting to play with you"... While each hound is different, in general they are quite independent (mine is full out aloof). They are self-sufficient and unless you give them a REASON to, they don't naturally look to humans for direction. I always tell people that my hound makes me work for the privilege of being the handler - its humbling but worth it!

Now for the escape artist part - obviously the best option is management and setting Maggie up for success. So that means no unsupervised access to the yard. Secondly, make playing or being with you more exciting than anything she can do on her own. Practice recalls A LOT and make sure its VERY rewarding for her to come to you (I use cooked meat and/or tugging with Dodger). Self-control exercises like stays and leave its are just as important as recalls IMO so that's also something I suggest you work on.

IMO, leaving a dog tethered outside unsupervised is just as risky as being untethered. She could still slip her collar, chew the tether or injure herself. The only real solution is management, training and exercise (and I would add time since she is a new addition).

Writing4Fun
November 10th, 2007, 07:53 PM
My Phoebe's a climber. :rolleyes: But we had her in obedience classes from a very young age, so her recall is great. But she's my shadow at any rate. She only climbs to get to whatever side of the fence I'm on at the time. :D

You might want to look into boundary training. It'll be hard work, but in the end, you'll have a dog you can trust in the yard for more than 2 minutes at a time. In the mean time, you'll be on constant doggie watch. I don't like tying dogs outdoors. So much can go wrong ... they can wrap themselves around an object, a strange dog can get in and attack them, they can get cornered by a skunk, etc... Sometimes, they feel threatened or bored when tied, so they develop destructive behaviors like digging or aggression.

Good luck!

Luba
November 10th, 2007, 08:29 PM
It's unfortunately not a breed stereotype, it's just the truth of the natural instinct of the dog.

IF someone is lucky enough to have a hound who doesn't want to take off and follow a scent or site on something then well... that's just luck in my opinion and of course obedience has a lot to do with it.

I wouldn't trust this to chance myself. IT's far too risky to say because this one dog doesn't take off that most if not nearly all hounds will.

All you need to do is look in the shelters they are crawling with them. Its not a game of retrieval it's the 'hunt' so to speak.

SnowDancer
November 10th, 2007, 10:39 PM
My hounds were all escape artists - over or under the fence didn't matter - and they would try this when attached by a long tether to me! They couldn't help themselves - just their instinct - they sure didn't want to get lost or escape me - dogs just don't realize what could happen to them. I know longer have a hound, but a 22 lb. Eskimo who with a bit of room to give himself a good running start could easily find himself hanging over a 6 ft. fence - and no doubt break his neck when landing. He has a fear of crates, so that option was out. And at 13 weeks he was over an extra high baby gate in a second. Good thing my dogs have never wanted to go out without one of us accompanying them - particularly me on cold days.

Lissa
November 10th, 2007, 11:43 PM
To the OP - I hope you don't find this off-topic, I still see the relevance... If you don't, I'll delete this post!!:D

It's unfortunately not a breed stereotype, it's just the truth of the natural instinct of the dog.

IF someone is lucky enough to have a hound who doesn't want to take off and follow a scent or site on something then well... that's just luck in my opinion and of course obedience has a lot to do with it.

I wouldn't trust this to chance myself. IT's far too risky to say because this one dog doesn't take off that most if not nearly all hounds will.

All you need to do is look in the shelters they are crawling with them. Its not a game of retrieval it's the 'hunt' so to speak.

Are we talking about fence jumping here or walking hounds off-leash?

A bored hound is no more likely to jump a fence than a bored lab when left alone. Leaving the dog alone is the problem, not the breed.

Labelling an entire group of dogs that's made up of over 2 dozen recognized breeds is a problem. It means we don't have to commit to training or admit we failed because geez, hounds are a lost cause anyway. Many hounds in shelters are actually FAILED hunters, abandoned because they have no inclination to do anything but snuggle on the sofa!

Luck has nothing to do with Dodger not leaving the yard to roam. Dodger is not special - all that's involved is consistent positive reinforcement training combined with an abundance of physical and mental stimulation (not to mention setting him up for success). All hounds have this potential. (For the record, Dodger hunts everday - he is not an exception to the breed in that his instincts are less strong, I just make sure they are channeled safely).

I'd be interested to know how much hound experience you have and what training methods you use on them. It might shed light on why you think hounds don't care about other dogs (when its recommended you don't keep hounds alone); why all hounds will jump fences (instinct is an excuse to remove our accountability); why you're lumping scent/sighthounds together (they represent entirely different training challenges); and why you think a hound would find retrieving rewarding (if that's the most I could offer Dodger, he would jump my non-existent fence)...

:shrug:

CearaQC
November 11th, 2007, 08:40 AM
Why not use the dog's urge to follow scents and turn it into a game?

Mark spots outside with whatever scent and have her sniff them all out. I think there are training scents to buy and they might be found in hunting gear shops or sections of stores. Or ask your local search and rescue teams and see what they use for scent training.

Backyards really aren't enough to release pent up energy in my opinion. Walk, ride... or if you live in an area with enough snow, train the dog to haul you around while you wear cross country skis, called skijoring.

http://www.skijoring.com/

A funny video with a guy and his dog skijoring. lol

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2u5dtbxTqco

white wrabbit
November 11th, 2007, 06:54 PM
I know why she jumped the fence!!!!!!!!!! she heard me open the front door when i went to get the paper to bring it in to read.. i realized it last night.:lightbulb: the time before she heard us leave i think she might of thought we left her... and i have only left her home once when we went out and that was the last time she went under (that has now been fixed).. we had to run to bus stop that day and i had to carry my youngest...


My yard is easy to fix we never thew out he lattice that we had with our old dog who was a jumper even in his old age. we had it so it was angled inward... hubby just is not home till end of this month to put it back up for me..

My mothers in laws dog was enough to keep her in the yard but we put her dogs collar on her just in case has name on phone number on it..
(still waiting for mine that i ordered)

in the yard and in the house she has great recall.. even now when distracted with the cats.. it is other peoples houses i am concerned about now.. where i can't supervise her every min.. i think it is better to take her with us where is is welcome to go instead of having her in her kennel at home... even if it is an hour or 2..

and she does get plenty of exercise outside of the yard.. we go, she goes..

as for the sledding i am waiting for the snow.. i got the harness and the sled and the little boy who loves his rides..

Longblades
November 12th, 2007, 10:52 AM
http://www.coyoteroller.com/home

Check out the link. This device was made to keep coyotes out but has been equally successful at keeping jumping dogs in.

white wrabbit
November 14th, 2007, 12:38 PM
thanks it is some thing to look in too.. but i think angling the fence is cheaper for us... (at our house) as for keeping her in other peoples yards i was told about a collar that i don't like but i guess you place a devise in the middle of the yard and they get a shock if they go out side of that circle.... it is a rather large circle...

kiara
November 14th, 2007, 02:00 PM
A professional dog trainer would help. I have 3 friends with big dogs, their dogs jump on people and pull while walking. I really don't mind it, since I am a huge animal lover. This would be money well spent! Let us know what you decided to do. Yesterday I saw this little terrier walking on people's lawns and on the sidewalk (no leash). Just behind was a woman walking, I asked if it was her dog? She said yes. Of course your dog is trained? she said yes.