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Parents want to give "sick" cat away

tyranosarahrex
October 15th, 2007, 05:01 PM
I just found this site using google and I am very thankful I did.
I am extremely upset by what is happening to my cat.

Her name is Annie, she is a muted tortie, about 8 years old. We found her out on the streets about 7 years ago. She seemed to be abused since she would get scared when you went to pet her and also because she didn't know how to meow.

Over the years I taught her to meow better by rewarding her with drinks from the sink faucet- which she loves! I was very proud. She doesn't flinch when petted now.

She is very reclusive and when I lived with my parents she really only came around me. No one else really paid attention to her :sad:

We moved to a new house about 4 years ago. She seemed to adjust rather well but began having problems where she doesn't seem to clean herself "down there".

When I moved away for college 3 years ago, she began pooing outside her litter box. Sometimes right next to the box, sometimes not. Occasionally she scoots across the carpet and leaves marks. My parents have tried new foods, pills, and other things the vet has recommended. She has bouts where she is better, but then other times she is worse.
A month ago, they got a new puppy and Annie is not happy. She is usually very relaxed but has recently begun hissing and swatting, which we have never seen her do.

My parents are fed up and finally told me last night they want to give her away. I am devastated. I have been crying nonstop. They give me lots of reasons: it would cost too much to run tests, medicine isn't helping, her poo is putting bacteria all over the house, she isn't even that much of a "pet" to them, etc.

I don't know what to tell them! I sent links from some articles I found in this forum about all the tips you can do to see what the problem is with a cat pooing. But I feel it's either a disease or she is depressed since no one pays attention to her.

I'm scared to bring her to my own place, since my roommate has a very aggressive cat. Would that even work?

I'm scared to give her to a shelter since she is older and not in the best of health.

I'm not sure how to find someone I would trust enough or that is nice enough to take in a cat like Annie.

I don't really know if I believe putting animals down but I'm starting to think it would be better than putting her in a shelter where she would probably be more traumatized and might not get adopted ever. At least then I would know she is "ok" in kitty heaven and that I was there with her when she went.

I don't know what more to say. Please tell me anything! I'm very desperate to talk to some logical, animal lovers right now.:sad:

chico2
October 15th, 2007, 05:12 PM
I am so sorry and you really have no say in the matter,since your parents are now the caregivers.
I have no doubt the puppy started her showing her displeasure by pooping outside the box,also since there is no love lost between your parents and Annie,I am sure she is a very unhappy kitty:cry:
I would suggest you taking her to your home,an aggressive other kitty does not really mean he will be aggressive towards Annie,not with proper slow introduction.
Having her put down,or given to a shelter is of course the worst for this poor cat,I hope you can find a way to keep her with you:pray:

LittleMomma
October 15th, 2007, 05:27 PM
Oh my :cry: What a situation! I'm glad you came here! Honestly, I would take her with you... see how things work out... you may be pleasantly surprised!

We had a very, verrrrry aggressive cat years ago and we successfully introduced two more (timid) cats and they all lived as one big happy family. The key for us was to SUPERVISE all interactions in the first couple weeks. We kept the new kitty (each came seperately) in a bathroom or bedroom while the resident agressive cat roamed around as usual. Then, we'd bring out a towel that the new cat was on and let resident cat sniff. Cats go a lot by smell. They'd investigate eachother under the door. After a day or two of this, we let them interact but only while one of us was there to make sure no one got bullied. Don't get me wrong, resident cat was angry at first, but like I said, we were all one big happy family for years.... as long as there is a proper introduction, I really, really think things will most likely work out.

I have cats that have been abused... one of which was abused and homeless for years and years before we gave her a home. It was a rough introduction because of the different personalities of the cats... but all was well because they're curled up around each other as I type this :goodvibes:

sugarcatmom
October 15th, 2007, 05:30 PM
I also vote for bringing her to live with you. Is there a room she can have all to herself for a while, where the roommate's cat can't get in? Perhaps with a very slow introduction and some Feliway (http://www.catfaeries.com/feliway.html), they'll eventually get along. Certainly that's the best alternative out of the bunch. Taking her to a shelter is a guaranteed death sentence, and it will be a lonely, terrified death. Surely even your parents wouldn't be that cruel. By the way, what are they going to do to the new puppy if it gets sick, or starts peeing and pooping on the rug? Get rid of it too? Discarding a pet when it needs its care-giver's help the most is, well, I'll be polite and just say heartless.

kiara
October 15th, 2007, 07:07 PM
I am using this forum to explain to the public about rescue work and it's problems. This sure is a sad story, but we are here for support! Cats have all kinds of personalities, just like humans. Some are quiet, shy or agressive, it does not necessarily mean that she was abused, unless you know for sure. My son has a male cat that is agressive by nature and sometimes pees on stuff, ( X-mas tree, shoes, toaster, kitchen counter, stove ) You cannot leave any food on the counter because he will eat it. He is always hungry! He is from a shelter and we don't know his history! ), I think because he is mad that my son did not let him go outside and he wants to be outside all the time! He is bad when he is outside, he fights with other male cats and rips people's garbage bags apart. This summer it was so hilarious, he was walking home with a huge bone from someone's barbeque. ( Since I am a rescuer of cats, I don't know if I would consider him adoptable) His female cat often misses the box and my son gets fed up with both of them. Since Annie is 8 yrs old, she is showing signs of aging. Take her to another vet for a second opinion and bring her file with you. She may have all kinds of health problems and may need medication. Then if she is healthy you can take her to your place and introduce them slowly. Your vet has seen it all and can provide advice as what to do with her if things don't work out at your place. You have several options. (Euthanasia is always the last resort). Sometimes also, cats that have these types of problems could maybe become mousers at a farm, where they live out their lives at a barn. I am highly offended by comments from people on this forum about rescues, that it could be a death sentence for cats! (Yes there are bad rescues out there!) We the rescuers have become a dumping ground for people's sick and unwanted pets! We do what we can with the resources we have. We look after them well and hope to find them good homes. We are dedicated volunteers and we often put money out of our own pockets to help out. We feel that some pets are considered "unadoptable" and we use common sense in these situations. Good luck and keep us posted.

sugarcatmom
October 15th, 2007, 09:08 PM
I am highly offended by comments from people on this forum about rescues, that it could be a death sentence for cats! (Yes there are bad rescues out there!) We the rescuers have become a dumping ground for people's sick and unwanted pets! We do what we can with the resources we have. We look after them well and hope to find them good homes. We are dedicated volunteers and we often put money out of our own pockets to help out. We feel that some pets are considered "unadoptable" and we use common sense in these situations.

I'm not really sure what you're trying to say here, and I'm not criticizing rescues at all. But you're deluded if you think that abandoning an older cat with possible medical problems at a shelter isn't likely to result in its demise. It's hard enough to find homes for all the perfectly healthy and adorable kittens.

From The Cincinnati Post:

Some felines need 'Litter Box 101'

By Linda Lombard
Associated Press

Americans adore their felines, or so it seems. We own more cats than any other type of animal companion. Still, millions of them end up in shelters every year, where, according to ASPCA estimates, 70 percent are destined for euthanasia.

Sadly, a great number of these cats are surrendered for behavioral issues that can be corrected with just a little thought and experimentation. And one of the most frequent problems is often simple to solve.

"One of the most common complaints is 'won't use litter box,' " says Jim Monsma, director of communications at the Washington, D.C., Animal Rescue League.

Smiley14
October 15th, 2007, 10:17 PM
I'm not really sure what you're trying to say here, and I'm not criticizing rescues at all. But you're deluded if you think that abandoning an older cat with possible medical problems at a shelter isn't likely to result in its demise. It's hard enough to find homes for all the perfectly healthy and adorable kittens.

From The Cincinnati Post:

To expound on Sugarcatmom's comments, telling people the blunt truth about shelters should never be considered offensive and has nothing to do with the wonderful work that shelters and rescue workers do. Many people here are also fellow rescue workers. Part of the process of education includes the hard facts that too many pets are abandoned at shelters and sadly have to be ethanized because as much as they do, it's literally and physically impossible for the shelters and rescue workers to handle the overwhelming influx. This is not an offensive statement; it is the cold, hard truth that people need to know about and hopefully think twice about before abandoning their pet for frivilous reasons.
If you look, you'll see MANY posts advocating adopting from rescue and that many of our own pets are rescue. Rescue is our passion and what brings most of us here. It is offensive for you to hint otherwise.

I thank you from the bottom of my heart for all the wonderful and amazing work you do. You are my hero. But please do not discount or discredit the efforts of others here as well with your blanket statement, as part of those efforts include the education and full awareness of those coming here for help.

chico2
October 16th, 2007, 08:14 AM
Kiara,in no way was I putting down rescues,I say Thank Dog,all these dedicated people care,many of whom are right here in the Forum,be it in a shelter or private home:thumbs up
Our HS in Oakville,is a no-kill shelter,loaded with cats,some whom have been there for years.:sad:
A prime example for unadoptables is my Rocky,he's 11yrs old,has sprayed in the house since he was about 5yrs old,destroyed quiet a few things,has H-Tyroidism,would anybody adopt him???
I strongly believe he would be put down.
Not that I would ever give up on him,he's here to stay until the end of his days,spraying or not.
From the first day I got him,I adored him and always will,people are not pefect and neither are cats/dogs.

Love4himies
October 16th, 2007, 09:51 AM
Just wondering if you have two litter boxes. Some cats like to pee in one and poo in the other, my foster momma is like this.

Please don't take your kitty to a shelter, that will much too stressful on her. I agree that you should try to take her back to your apt, keep her seperated from the other kitty for a while, then do very slow, supervised intros. I had one extremely aggressive male cat who would attack any cat or dog he saw outside, but didn't go after strange cats that were visiting in the house :shrug:. He even left a baby squirrel, which were nursing back to health, alone.

Your kitty is not disposible, I do believe they have feelings and love their owners.