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why all the dog whisperer/millan hate?

kigndano
September 13th, 2007, 07:35 AM
ive been using the "two finger" touch to my dogs neck to train him to stay in a room when i tell him to; you really just have to touch him a little bit if hes not riled up or anything, and they will just go lay down. the man obviously knows what he is doing, but i notice that a lot of people seem to hate his methods.

i really dont understand why though, all he does is touch thedogs on the neck or on the belly; and use body language as far as i can tell; ive never seen him smack a dog or anything -- i dont think hed have such calm well behaved dogs through violent beatings.

someone fill me in on why people hate him so much

clm
September 13th, 2007, 07:46 AM
I actually quite like his show and personally don't see anything wrong with his methods. I'd like to see some of the out takes from that show though. :laughing:

Cindy

sugarcatmom
September 13th, 2007, 08:16 AM
http://www.urbandawgs.com/divided_profession.html

Winston
September 13th, 2007, 08:59 AM
I personally really like him....I think hiis approach makes alot of sense! and lets face it the people that dont like him dont have to and perhaps they have there own way of doing things! I have used the finger approach for the mailman coming around the house and it works very well....Winston tends to bark his head off when he hears the clang of the mailbox.....He hates that noise.....

I have watched alot of Cesar's dvd's and I found them great!

Cindy

kigndano
September 13th, 2007, 09:28 AM
well its good to know im not the only dog owner who thinks that his methods make a lot of sense.

for example when i saw him say that eventually if you jingle your keys to take the dog for a ride, instead of him getting excited, he will sit down if you block his energy; "same thing as saying sit".

all the commands are human created, and mean nothing to the dog until we pair them with a reward. but energy means everything to animals, so to me that makes the most sense. i guess i dont mind if my dog is laying, sitting, rolled over, or doing whatever as long as he is being calm and submissive.

ancientgirl
September 13th, 2007, 10:56 AM
I don't have a dog, but I've watched his show on occasion, and there are some things he does that look mean, but I do agree that sometimes distracting a dog by maybe a touch of the finger is a good idea.

I've also watched a show on Animal Planet called "It's me or the dog," It's a British woman who is the trainer, and she seems very good. I don't think I've ever really seen her touch or grab a dog.

If you haven't watched it, have a view, its pretty good and the things she says make sense.

Ford Girl
September 13th, 2007, 11:54 AM
I personally really like him....I think hiis approach makes alot of sense! and lets face it the people that dont like him dont have to and perhaps they have there own way of doing things! I have used the finger approach for the mailman coming around the house and it works very well....Winston tends to bark his head off when he hears the clang of the mailbox.....He hates that noise.....

I have watched alot of Cesar's dvd's and I found them great!

Cindy



Hey Cindy, Dazy is a real barker when it comes to people coming in our yard or around the yard for that matter, especially the mail man!! Altho she's gentle and is just coming to say hello, she's scary with her bigger then life bark and bouncing 70lb body....I don't get to watch these shows on TV, did you buy the DVD's or rent them? Where can I find them? The only shows I get to watch are End of my leash and Good Dog, both I like to watch, just cuz they invovle dogs, not so much for their training methods.

Winston
September 13th, 2007, 12:08 PM
Hey Cindy, Dazy is a real barker when it comes to people coming in our yard or around the yard for that matter, especially the mail man!! Altho she's gentle and is just coming to say hello, she's scary with her bigger then life bark and bouncing 70lb body....I don't get to watch these shows on TV, did you buy the DVD's or rent them? Where can I find them? The only shows I get to watch are End of my leash and Good Dog, both I like to watch, just cuz they invovle dogs, not so much for their training methods.

Hey Fordgirl! that is funny! Winston does the same thing! he has never even met the mailman only seen him from a distance but I guess Winston doesnt like the fact that he comes to visit 5 days a week but never comes to see him personally! As for the set I got it from someone and made a copy! It is a set of 4 dvd's and it is the entire season 1..I checked for along time at the movie store and they dont have it! If you like I could burn a copy for you and send it out in the mail? You could PM with an address ...I really enjoyed the series and it is not for everyone...but it gave some great tips and advice!!

Cindy

Ford Girl
September 13th, 2007, 04:13 PM
Sent! Thanks! I am one of those people who likes to learn it all regardless of the theory behind it, I found in training Dazy I've had to take bits and pieces of difference advice and methods for it to work on her. :thumbs up

I know some people don't agree with the theory behind End of my Leash Either - Brad Pattison. I called his company the other day, they are based in Calgary, the class they offer sounds really good...not treat based (which I'd like to try), it's at a different location around the city each week, sometimes right down town, but it's very expensive. I am really interested in his 4 legs to fitness class, so I started umbillical walking with Dazy, I might give it a go in a few weeks. I could use the exercise and Dazy would love it too.

t.pettet
September 13th, 2007, 10:16 PM
I have tried some of Cesar's methods and they have worked really well. Learn something new every time I watch his episodes.

OC_Spirit
September 14th, 2007, 12:33 AM
I personally dont like his methods because they are a danger to anyone trying to use them on a dog who has a bit more of an "edge" than your average dog. Not only that but other methods of his can also instill fear and distruct between dog and handler. How would you feel if someone grabbed you up and threw you on your back holding you there??? Not to mention studies have shown that both dogs and wolves do not alpha roll each other...What happens is the submissive dog WILLINGLY rolls over for the dominant dog. Sure the dominanting dog may chest the submissive dog (bumping into them hard with their chest and their head held high above) buit it is not enough to cause the other dog to fall and roll over. If that dog did not want to be dominated he could hold his ground and retaliate (which happens). So what happens if a person tries to flip a dog that isnt submissive enough to be willing to be flipped? Suddenly you get greeted with a mouth full of teeth in your face...and what happens if you go to flip the dog but suddenly realize he's actually too big/heavy for you to flip? Suddenly he has learned that he is stronger than you and if he has a dominant personality you risk him usin it to his own advantage and making problems worse!

The other thing that bother me about Cesar is that everything to him is a dominance issue. Whether it be the dog jumping on the furniture or being scared of the toatser...Not everything is a dominance issue people...

Lastly, yes the two-finger method is great for redirecting the dog's attention but what happens if you get a dog who redirects frustration? Lets say a dog is at the end of the leash barking and snarling at another dog (dog-reactive agresion) and you go and poke him in the side putting his attention on you. The dog is so frusterated about not being able to get the other dog that when you poke him he simply reacts by releasing his frustration on to you.

Thanks Cesar but I like my face and prefer to try to keep as many fingers on my hand as I was born with....

TeriM
September 14th, 2007, 03:06 AM
The other thing that bother me about Cesar is that everything to him is a dominance issue. Whether it be the dog jumping on the furniture or being scared of the toatser...Not everything is a dominance issue people...


Yep, I think that is my biggest issue with him as well. I do believe he has some good recommendations but overall I think he is just waaayyy to caught up in "dominating".

sugarcatmom
September 14th, 2007, 08:18 AM
He's also come under a lot of criticism for his "flooding" technique - trying to eradicate a dog's fears or neuroses by bombarding them with the stimulus. Pop psychology at its worst. How would you like it if you had a phobia of spiders and he locked you in a box with hundreds of them crawling all over you? You'd probably go a bit coo-coo after that. It's dangerous and inhumane and I can't believe so many people have fallen for his "schtick".

ancientgirl
September 14th, 2007, 09:11 AM
I saw one program of his where I believe a Great Dane had this fear of walking on very shiny floors. He practically dragged that dog on those floors. I didn't like that. Some things about his techniques I like, but others look just plain cruel. Dogs and cats aren't like people. You can't sit down and reason to them like a person and explain something isn't going to hurt them. I thought what he did was mean.

I also don't like this one collar he uses, it looks like thorns digging into a dogs neck.

Ford Girl
September 14th, 2007, 09:57 AM
I have never seen the show, and when you research him or google him you get as many supporters as you do opposers. I see the same thing with my 2 trainers, somethings I agree with and some I don't. I guess it comes down to what ever you are comfortable with and what works best with your dog. :shrug:

Winston
September 14th, 2007, 10:34 AM
I agree Ford Girl! You have to take what will work for you out of his shows! I saw the show with the Great Dane and thought he did wonders for it! With that show he used calm and assertive behaviour and quickly walked the dog through the front door of a school where the dog had a fear of the shiny floors! The dog was so fearfull because he was always given the ability to think about the floors and his owner also exhibited the fear and the dog sensed it! What Cesar did was distract the dog upon entering the building and the dog did not have enough time to really think about the floors and after some practice the fear went away and the dog was able to walk on the floors!

Cindy

kigndano
September 14th, 2007, 12:09 PM
my only response to you guys would be this...

how else do you get a dog over a fear?

you cant talk to them, and reason it out...

you obviously couldnt slowly walk the great dane onto the floor..he just resisted and resisted.

so if you arent going to make him face a fear, what do you do?

also the comparison to spiders is foolish IMO.

a shiny floor is not a danger..a room full of spiders could be, they could be poisonous etc.

if a human had a fear of carpets...would you say putting him on a carpeted floor was inhumane??

please, compare apples to apples, otherwise it just looks like you are making completely rediculous comparisons to try and hold up your side of an arguement.

Love4himies
September 14th, 2007, 12:37 PM
I have seen shows on human fears and one of the ways to conquer it is to face it (I know, it worked with me). I have never seen the show and I am not doggie smart so I can't comment on his training ways, but do think if it is safe to face the fear, the only way to get a dog over it is to face it. The dog may then learn his fear is unfounded.:shrug:.

pitgrrl
September 14th, 2007, 12:59 PM
my only response to you guys would be this...

how else do you get a dog over a fear?

you cant talk to them, and reason it out...


You can use desensitization rather than flooding.
You can have patience and slowly teach the dog to change his/her associations with the thing that's feared.
You can build a dog's confidence.
You can teach them to re-direct their attention in situations they find stressful.

I have seen shows on human fears and one of the ways to conquer it is to face it (I know, it worked with me). I have never seen the show and I am not doggie smart so I can't comment on his training ways, but do think if it is safe to face the fear, the only way to get a dog over it is to face it. The dog may then learn his fear is unfounded.:shrug:.

There are many ways to face fears though. You can force the dog into a situation where they are being bombarded with whatever it is they fear, and risk having the dog shut down so completely that they're not really learning th deal with the situation (though they may appear calm) or getting yourself bitten.
You could also slowly expose the dog to whatever they are fearful of, slowly desensitizing them to whatever it is and provide alternative behaviours for the dog in those situations which it finds stressful. :shrug:

I know which way I've choosen to go with my dog who was so terrified of thunderstorms that it literally dictated all our lives last summer, but whatever floats your boat I guess.

Love4himies
September 14th, 2007, 01:29 PM
There are many ways to face fears though. You can force the dog into a situation where they are being bombarded with whatever it is they fear, and risk having the dog shut down so completely that they're not really learning th deal with the situation (though they may appear calm) or getting yourself bitten.
You could also slowly expose the dog to whatever they are fearful of, slowly desensitizing them to whatever it is and provide alternative behaviours for the dog in those situations which it finds stressful. :shrug:

I know which way I've choosen to go with my dog who was so terrified of thunderstorms that it literally dictated all our lives last summer, but whatever floats your boat I guess.

I agree, pitgrrl, perhaps safe was not the exact word I should have used. I meant to include, that it won't put absolute terror and stress into the dog. Every situation and dog is different.

Winston
September 14th, 2007, 01:38 PM
Honestly we could debate this forever! but I have to say again I saw that episode and it was a school teacher that brought her dogs to class with her. She tried everything...I mean everything...she wouldnt give up on her dog! All he really did was distract her a few times going into the school until she realised there was nothing to harm her...the floors did not hurt her....and with the owner being calm and assertive going in..she learned to accept the floors..I really think that there are many places out there that do not offer the best advise for training but if I choose to listen then I can certainly choose whether that is the right technique for me or not....

Another example of this would be a prong collar...he does not really beleive in them...I should be able to control my dog...well let me tell you I could never have control of my boy without a prong collar...he 110 pounds of muscle...he can pulll me over in a second! so! I have to use it! not all beleive in them...

Cindy

sugarcatmom
September 14th, 2007, 02:20 PM
also the comparison to spiders is foolish IMO.

Would it make you feel better if I said lady-bugs instead of spiders? Sheesh. You apparently don't get the point. The inhumane aspect comes from possibly causing permanent psychological trauma. If the goal is to help the individual overcome the fear, throwing them into the fire has large potential to backfire. See pitgrrl's post on the use of systematic desensitization.

kigndano
September 14th, 2007, 03:29 PM
sugarcat

yes, it does make me feel better

its just the general feeling that someone reading the post would have about spiders, vs what they would have about floors. you are using it to your advantage in the argument, IMO.

sugarcatmom
September 14th, 2007, 03:56 PM
sugarcat

yes, it does make me feel better

its just the general feeling that someone reading the post would have about spiders, vs what they would have about floors. you are using it to your advantage in the argument, IMO.

Cool. I guess I didn't see it that way since I don't have a fear of spiders myself (I actually rescue them if they're in harm's way, ie: paranoid coworkers about to stomp them).

les
September 14th, 2007, 06:46 PM
I didn't like his methods at first but the more I listened to him (and read his book) I changed my mind. I mistook calm submission for fear and thought he was simply "scaring" the dogs into listening.

Honestly, Ceasar never says to alpha roll a dog if you have any question about it but to call in a professional trainer.

I have to say, I think flooding is the only way to get a dog past an irrational fear. My dog for example, has a fear of loud noises ... thunder, fireworks etc. I did the worst thing possible for years .. and gave affection while she was hiding in the closet shaking. All I did was make it worse. What I started doing this summer is walking her - - not really in a thunder storm ;) but during fireworks. Walking her properly .. not letting her roam around out front but having her walk beside/behind me and I just project calm energy .... it's made a world of difference and I don't think it's cruel to her .. I tried other methods .... like explaining thunder to her ... but she just doesnt get it ;)

I can't wait for his next book to come out :)

LavenderRott
September 15th, 2007, 12:01 AM
The problem with Cesar is this - you can't learn how to train a dog from a half hour t.v. show. Or an hour one.

For every person here who has gotten his book and read the entire thing to learn the methods he uses on t.v. - 10 people have not but will try to repeat what they saw on t.v. While he might say in his book not to alpha roll a dog if you have a question about it - there are plenty of people out there who are perfectly willing to show their dog who is boss by sheer force.

As for the person who mentioned how using his method helped them deal with their dog's fear of loud noises - I am glad it worked for you. I have a dog with issues and I can tell you this - forcing him to do something that he is terrified to do will, without question, put me in the ER waiting for stitches. We have to deal with things a bit more creatively and it takes longer to fix then an hour - but in the end, my dog is more confident and knows that I will not put him in harm's way.

want4rain
September 15th, 2007, 08:32 AM
i think we are all aware that there is nothing black and white in the world. there are quite a few good things Millan does along with a few not so great. his desire to help people cope with their dogs problems is a noble one. educating people that there IS a way to cope with their dogs in a healthy way is also wonderful. its clearly stated on each episode to NOT TRY THIS AT HOME.


*shrugs* every dog is different. :) just as every owner is different and each living condition is different.

as for folks trying what he shows on tv.... my husband did and it did us a world of good. he (when Mister was only 35 or so pounds) threw Mister on his leash, puffed his chest out in confidence and took him for a walk. while it was silly looking to watch him walk around like a penguin outside! but it helped. *chuckles* (would i try the rest of it? HECK NO!!! LOL!!! :laughing:)

-ashley

Jim Hall
September 15th, 2007, 08:41 AM
I watched about 2 hrs of him last night Whet a heck of a teacher!!

I love the way he teaches the humans as much as the dogs and when the humans do what he suggestes, it works

I agree that every method does not work for every dog and would love to see some outakes.

But the theme of being the calm alpha in the pack is the fundamental of all the training i have ever done woth both cats and dogs.

LavenderRott
September 15th, 2007, 08:42 AM
i think we are all aware that there is nothing black and white in the world. there are quite a few good things Millan does along with a few not so great. his desire to help people cope with their dogs problems is a noble one. educating people that there IS a way to cope with their dogs in a healthy way is also wonderful. its clearly stated on each episode to NOT TRY THIS AT HOME.



Having a disclaimer at the end of the show is a lot like the vet forum here, though, isn't it? How many times a week do people come here and tell us about their dog/cat that is bleeding from somewhere, won't eat, won't go to the bathroom, yada, yada, yada - can we tell them a - what is wrong and b - how to fix it so that they don't have to pay a vet?

EdwinBird
September 15th, 2007, 12:44 PM
I've found the show to be somewhat entertaining, but when I've watched it, it wasn't to learn anything about how to deal with my dog.

I know he deals with aggressive behaviour and other *big* issues and it is good that they have a disclaimer saying, "Don't try this at home." But if I'm watching a show on dog training, I actually want to be able to "try it at home." (Of course, as LavenderRott said, you can't learn how to train your dog from a half hour T.V. show - nothing replaces an actual trainer.)

MyBirdIsEvil
September 16th, 2007, 08:10 PM
The problem with Cesar is this - you can't learn how to train a dog from a half hour t.v. show. Or an hour one.

For every person here who has gotten his book and read the entire thing to learn the methods he uses on t.v. - 10 people have not but will try to repeat what they saw on t.v. While he might say in his book not to alpha roll a dog if you have a question about it - there are plenty of people out there who are perfectly willing to show their dog who is boss by sheer force.

As for the person who mentioned how using his method helped them deal with their dog's fear of loud noises - I am glad it worked for you. I have a dog with issues and I can tell you this - forcing him to do something that he is terrified to do will, without question, put me in the ER waiting for stitches. We have to deal with things a bit more creatively and it takes longer to fix then an hour - but in the end, my dog is more confident and knows that I will not put him in harm's way.

Having a disclaimer at the end of the show is a lot like the vet forum here, though, isn't it? How many times a week do people come here and tell us about their dog/cat that is bleeding from somewhere, won't eat, won't go to the bathroom, yada, yada, yada - can we tell them a - what is wrong and b - how to fix it so that they don't have to pay a vet?
Unfortunately I think this thread is a pretty good example....

I'm actually a fan of Cesar, and there's some really scary misconceptions of how to use his techniques...

I'm a firm believer that if you're dumb enough to do something when there's a disclaimer that specifically says "DON'T DO THIS" you deserve what you get, but I'm starting to get a little bit tired of people thinking they're an expert because they watched Milan's show a couple of times.

my only response to you guys would be this...

how else do you get a dog over a fear?

you cant talk to them, and reason it out...

you obviously couldnt slowly walk the great dane onto the floor..he just resisted and resisted.

so if you arent going to make him face a fear, what do you do?

also the comparison to spiders is foolish IMO.

a shiny floor is not a danger..a room full of spiders could be, they could be poisonous etc.

if a human had a fear of carpets...would you say putting him on a carpeted floor was inhumane??

please, compare apples to apples, otherwise it just looks like you are making completely rediculous comparisons to try and hold up your side of an arguement

No offense, but you don't seem to know what you're talking about. As I stated above I'm actually a fan of Cesar Milan, but his is NOT the only way to train a dog. Individual dogs require an individual assessment and have different training needs. Just because you watched his show or read his book and he used a certain method on a certain dog does NOT make it right for your dog. It also doesn't mean it's the method that you personally should use because individual people understand and utilize different methods than other people.

I'll say what I say to everyone else when this comes up (and for some reason it seems to come up more with guys that are over 6 ft tall and feel the need to state how much physical control they have of their dogs)
I'm 5'1. There's no way I could physically alpha roll any dog, yet I can walk both my 50-60lb dogs on leash at the same time without any problems, even with one extremely dominant dog. Normal leashes. There's OTHER ways to teach your dogs who is in control and train them WITHOUT physical force, and in fact with physical force most dogs will only show resistance.
By physical force I mean manhandling the dog by means like alpha rolls, or yanking/pulling hard on the leash. Not prong collars and such which actually don't require any force when used properly.

I also have the ability to control 800-1000+ lb animals (horses), and many of the same training methods can be used on dogs. What do you think would happen if I tried to physically force a horse to do something? Not much....Most people that try these methods only find resistance and end up in a losing battle. The same is true of dogs.
Don't like the horse/dog analogy? I've seen Cesar use it also. In fact there was a show with a woman who trained horses but could not control her dog and he made comparisons throughout the show.

Your comments actually give me the feeling that you DON'T understand Cesars methods, not that you have a firm understanding and a basis for argument in support of them.

~michelle~
September 16th, 2007, 10:27 PM
i like watching the ceaser shows.... but again i wont try everything he does. i have found that he often tries different methods with different dogs. but again i wouldnt try many of the things he does, if your dog has some of the problems they hilight on those shows you should have consulted a trainer/behaviourist already!
the problem with any show like that is that they show 1/2 -1hour of very edited film, it doesnt show you the entire process the analysising the problems, etc etc. he works with these dogs for hours and they only highlight the "exciting parts" for TV, but the market is there and someone is going to make money off of it.

i think his basic msg on his show is good.
be calm, assertive, dont let your emotions get the best of you and get professional help. I also like he promotes excercise to eliminate some behaviour problems and providing your dog with mental stimulation and building a relationship with your dog. unfortunately many people use this as a replacement for proper training and seeking proper help.

I have seen things he does i dont agree with at all, but doing anything in life your not going to do it 100% the way someone else does.

Brokn_Arrow
September 17th, 2007, 01:56 PM
I watched about 2 hrs of him last night Whet a heck of a teacher!!

I love the way he teaches the humans as much as the dogs and when the humans do what he suggestes, it works

I agree that every method does not work for every dog and would love to see some outakes.

But the theme of being the calm alpha in the pack is the fundamental of all the training i have ever done woth both cats and dogs.

Yup... that about sums it up. Calm Alpha is the key. Well said Jim! :thumbs up He really does rehabilitate dogs, and TRAINS humans.

Love him, or hate him. But no one can say that he doesn't get positive results.

Take what you want from Cesar, and leave the rest because that's your choice. But if there is one thing that we all should listen to as gospel from him is a good paced, 45 minute walk in the morning, before dog gets his breakfast. I also walk my dog again at night before his supper. IMO, a tired/worked dog is a happy dog. :dog:

Ever notice that on every episode he walks with the animal? That's not a coincidence.

Alpha rolling is sure a hot topic, isn't it? I feel bad for those owners that feel put into a position that they have to resort to that. Truth is, sometimes that's what it comes down to for the dog to understand that he/she is a member of the pack, not the leader of it. I will always maintain that dogs are happier when they know that they are a pack follower.

I have yet to see an episode where I thought that he was being cruel to the animal. I've seen dogs thrash around and resist, but that's just the animal releasing energy. And of course the dog isnt "cured" in a half hour. Training IS repitition.

Exercise, Discipline, Affection. In that order. :pawprint:

clm
September 17th, 2007, 02:32 PM
But if there is one thing that we all should listen to as gospel from him is a good paced, 45 minute walk in the morning, before dog gets his breakfast. I also walk my dog again at night before his supper. IMO, a tired/worked dog is a happy dog. :dog:

:

A lot of dogs in my neighbourhood. I see very few of them out for walks. :shrug: I hear a lot of them barking, I see a lot of them through their fences, but I never see them out for a walk. :confused:
Just because you have a backyard, doesn't mean a puppy or dog is going to get all the exercise they need by themselves out there. A good walk in the morning before they eat is a great way to kick start your day and theirs. Mine get fed an hour or so after their walk in the evening and then we play with them for another hour or so outside before bed.

I've seen a few of his shows where people simply weren't exercising their dogs enough.

Cindy

dtbmnec
September 17th, 2007, 05:29 PM
I've never seen this guy's show....

Damn you people and your super duper cable packages! *shakes fist*

:p

Megan

clm
September 18th, 2007, 08:04 AM
I've never seen this guy's show....

Damn you people and your super duper cable packages! *shakes fist*

:p

Megan

:laughing::laughing:Well, you're the smart one. Cost me over $100.00 per month for cable, hundreds of channels and I end up watching my DVD's most of the time because there's nothing on. :laughing::laughing:

Cindy

les
September 18th, 2007, 08:59 AM
Everybody talks about how the show is only half an hour and all the parts that are cut out ... but .. no kidding .... I let my dogs walk all over me during walks for 2 years. I walked them on flexis and gave them all the "freedom" they wanted.

One day I decided to try Ceasar's way of walking. No kidding .. it only took a few minutes and a few corrections (I like the noise and the claw made with your hand) and they had it.

I think his methods work fast because he uses and understands dog psychology. Not to say it never takes longer then a half hour but what he does just works.


Edited to add: I don't mean to say they're "perfect" -- everyday we do the same thing and everyday somebody needs a correction to keep in line but the difference is just amazing.

kigndano
September 18th, 2007, 10:35 AM
yea

who ever said that they wanted cable....dont get it

i watch nothing but ondemand movies and shows, live tv is terrible.

youd do better off with netflix or something.

OC_Spirit
September 18th, 2007, 12:29 PM
A lot of dogs in my neighbourhood. I see very few of them out for walks. :shrug: I hear a lot of them barking, I see a lot of them through their fences, but I never see them out for a walk. :confused:
Just because you have a backyard, doesn't mean a puppy or dog is going to get all the exercise they need by themselves out there. A good walk in the morning before they eat is a great way to kick start your day and theirs. Mine get fed an hour or so after their walk in the evening and then we play with them for another hour or so outside before bed.

I've seen a few of his shows where people simply weren't exercising their dogs enough.

Cindy

Could it be possible that they just walk them late at night? Unless I have to run errands I prefer not to walk my dogs during the day because its hotter and there are way more stupid people out and about then I care to deal with. Walks are for me and my dog to get excercise, not so I can stop every 5 seconds so Sally-Sue and Joe can let their 5 little kids maul my dogs while I try to teach them how to properly approach dogs and so forth. It is no uncommon at all for me to head out at 2am....That way the only people that are out are the occasional drivers, a couple drunkards, and teens up to know good who know better than to mess with me (cause I know them LOL)

clm
September 18th, 2007, 03:00 PM
We usually walk ours at night too.....they prefer the cooler temps and we prefer the lack of people. :laughing: Winter is different. As long as it's below 0 celcius, they'll walk along like little troupers bright sunshine or not. Weekdays in winter it's always dark when we walk them anyway, by the time we get home from work, not much daylight left. :laughing: Not many people out and about on winter days either. Their morning walk is at 4:30 in the morning, so precious few people around then too. The odd skunk and raccoon maybe.

Seriously though, we've lived here for over 20 years. I see the same 4 people always out with their dogs. An older shepherd mix I see out twice a day, sweet old dog. A couple of ****zus and a pit bull. Some I see in the mornings, some during the day on weekends. A few at night, but most of the homes with the bigger type dogs, neopolitain mastiffs (one guy has 5 of these in a tiny back yard), shepherds, dobes, rotti's and malamutes. All beautiful dogs, but I've never seen them out of their yards unless they've escaped. It's too bad. I'm a real Gladis Cravitz (for those of you too young to remember the nosey neighbour on Bewitched), I'm always watching what's happening in the neighbourhood all hours of the day and night. :laughing:
The mal up the street who died a few weeks ago, when he was younger, he would jump his owners 6 foot fence and go with my hubby and our last dog for his walk. :laughing:

People don't know what they're missing by skipping walking their dogs. It's a great way to see the neighbourhood and a great way to spend some time with your dog too.

Cindy

Brokn_Arrow
September 18th, 2007, 08:26 PM
People don't know what they're missing by skipping walking their dogs. It's a great way to see the neighbourhood and a great way to spend some time with your dog too.

Cindy

Yup. :thumbs up

Keeps the mischievious behaviors to a minimum.

papillonmama
September 19th, 2007, 11:03 AM
I like the dog whisperer show, I really like how he emphasizes, not to take the dogs behaviour personally, and for the owner to remain calm and to correct appropriately, also to live in the moment. I also like how he uses balanced dogs to help with the training.

I also like that he watches dogs to learn about dogs, lol, he's always saying that he's always learning from dogs and all of his experiences, that's a lot of honesty, for a trainer to admit that their own learning process is never done.

I never used to watch it, but one day I decided to see what all the hype was about, now I catch it when I can, or when I remember.