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another good article

heidiho
May 20th, 2004, 05:14 PM
6. Continue playing this until dog catches on 100% of the time. Now switch hands and do the game with your left hand holding the treat and hiding the more valuable treat in your right hand. She must know leave it means leaving it no matter what hand you are holding the treat in.

7. After awhile you will be able to up the ante by placing treats under your feet, or on the floor, or even right on her paws.

8. Take the dog for a walk onleash, and begin tossing food items or toys on the ground. As you throw the item, call a leave it. If he goes for it, say, “too bad, no treat,” and continue walking toward the next item. Don’t forget to reward with a hidden treat when the dog does leave the item alone. Make a huge fuss over the dog whenever he leaves the item, especially if there are outside distractions to contend with.

What you will gain from playing Leave It is a dog who will actually turn away from the item he’s to leave. So make sure when you’re playing a lot, and the dog is getting really good at it, that the dog begin to turn his face away from the item, not just his eyes. Play, play and play somemore!

TEACHING DROP IT
Make sure you make all training games a lot of fun for the dog. Start simple training with something that the dog likes, but doesn’t consider too terribly valuable. Play with him by making exchanges, first by exchanging an item with a food treat . When you’re first training, you want to work with items that ARE NOT very valuable, like tennis balls, or other non-food items! If your dog is a serious food/object guarder, toss a treat a distance away from the dog so that you will have enough time to pick up the item that was in his mouth. As soon as you see the dog open his mouth to drop the item, SAY “DROP IT!” That way, he’ll begin to learn that you want him to spit out the item, even when you don’t have a food exchange for him. When your dog comes back after retrieving the treat you’ve tossed for him, GIVE HIM BACK THIS TENNIS BALL OR OTHER NON-VALUABLE ITEM IMMEDIATELY! This will help you establish trust between your dog and you; he will learn that you’re not going to forcefully make him give something up, and that when he DOES give something up, YOU give him something even better (he gives up a lousy tennis ball, but gets a piece of cheese in exchange - woohoo!!)!

When the dog is really dropping the tennis ball quickly, you can start hand-feeding him the food treat by holding it out to the side so that the dog’s face is not right in front of your own. As he’s eating the treat directly from your hand, pick up the tennis ball and be ready to give it back when he’s finished eating the treat.

If you’re now able to command a DROP IT, and your dog DOES drop a toy from his mouth when you command it, it’s time to up the ante and begin working with more valuable items. Start all over again and repeat the process as you did with the tennis ball. As the items become more valuble that you’re working with, exercise caution that you don’t get bitten.

In addition to this, please play the LEAVE IT game as often as you possibly can. Also, read the directions for playing tug of war. Playing tug is one way to get your dog to have a bomb-proof DROP IT. Play by the rules!!

Rules for Playing Tug of War
1. Start the game off by making the dog sit or down
2. Ask the dog, ''wanna play tug?''
3. Command a ''take it.'' and then give it to her
4. Play for a little while, and then ask for a ''drop it.'' The dog should have a bomb-proof drop it and should release the toy immediately. If the dog doesn't release it, just hold onto the toy and don't pull on it or look at her. She'll realize that ''well... this is boring'' and then should release the toy. Praise her for the release, but put the toy away.
5. You can re-start the game in about 5 minutes or so (this serves as a time out for her ignoring the drop it command).
6. Play again, and then ask for a drop it. If she drops it, PRAISE HER and GIVE HER THE TOY IMMEDIATELY with a take it command.
7. It's recommended that once in awhile, after commanding her to drop it, that you do a couple of obedience maneuvers before re-starting the game.
8. With any dog who has shown aggression toward an owner or other humans, NEVER LET THAT DOG WIN A ROUND. If you find that sometimes the dog has gotten the best of you and was able to pull the toy out of your hand, let her think you planned it that way, AND SAY ''TAKE IT!''
9. Whatever toy you choose for playing tug should ALWAYS BE PUT AWAY and out of the dog's reach. REMEMBER THAT IT IS YOUR TOY, as are all others. Put the toy away until YOU decide when to bring it out again.
10. If the dog makes any mistakes, like touching your skin with her teeth, the game ends immediately, the toy gets put away, and she gets ignored for about 3 minutes or so. Wait several hours after a mistake like that before re-starting the game. Put the toy away.
NOTE: If you are playing tug with a puppy, DO NOT PULL TOO HARD. Your puppies teeth are not strong enough yet, and you do not want to strain or sprain any of your dog’s muscles, tendons or ligaments.

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Last edited by Renee Premaza : 03-20-2004 at 11:00 PM.

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heidi johnston

Luba
May 20th, 2004, 06:18 PM
NEVER PLAY TUG OF WAR!!!

Was this on the site I gave you????? Or another one!!

Rules for Playing Tug of War
1. Start the game off by making the dog sit or down
2. Ask the dog, ''wanna play tug?''
3. Command a ''take it.'' and then give it to her
4. Play for a little while, and then ask for a ''drop it.'' The dog should have a bomb-proof drop it and should release the toy immediately. If the dog doesn't release it, just hold onto the toy and don't pull on it or look at her. She'll realize that ''well... this is boring'' and then should release the toy. Praise her for the release, but put the toy away.
5. You can re-start the game in about 5 minutes or so (this serves as a time out for her ignoring the drop it command).
6. Play again, and then ask for a drop it. If she drops it, PRAISE HER and GIVE HER THE TOY IMMEDIATELY with a take it command.
7. It's recommended that once in awhile, after commanding her to drop it, that you do a couple of obedience maneuvers before re-starting the game.
8. With any dog who has shown aggression toward an owner or other humans, NEVER LET THAT DOG WIN A ROUND. If you find that sometimes the dog has gotten the best of you and was able to pull the toy out of your hand, let her think you planned it that way, AND SAY ''TAKE IT!''
9. Whatever toy you choose for playing tug should ALWAYS BE PUT AWAY and out of the dog's reach. REMEMBER THAT IT IS YOUR TOY, as are all others. Put the toy away until YOU decide when to bring it out again.
10. If the dog makes any mistakes, like touching your skin with her teeth, the game ends immediately, the toy gets put away, and she gets ignored for about 3 minutes or so. Wait several hours after a mistake like that before re-starting the game. Put the toy away.
NOTE: If you are playing tug with a puppy, DO NOT PULL TOO HARD. Your puppies teeth are not strong enough yet, and you do not want to strain or sprain any of your dog’s muscles, tendons or ligaments

heidiho
May 20th, 2004, 06:24 PM
Another one..

Luba
May 20th, 2004, 08:17 PM
You should never play tug of war with your dog period!!

Lucky Rescue
May 20th, 2004, 09:38 PM
Is there a particular reason you say that Luba? I play tug with my dog all the time, and it's a favorite game of every pit bull I know of.:)

I start the game and I end it (when my arms feel as though they will be yanked out!) Chloe knows the "OUT" command very well, and will instantly open her mouth and drop whatever is in it when I say it.

It's good exercise for both of us, and Chloe just adores it. I know some people think it will make dogs aggressive, but I do not believe that. I probably wouldn't play this game with a large, dominant male of some breeds, but all in all, if your dog is good at obeying commands, I see no problem.
http://pic10.picturetrail.com/VOL320/1047157/1960669/25771090.jpg

mona_b
May 20th, 2004, 09:40 PM
I have to agree with that..And also no rough playing.Like wrestling.

I know of someone who was doing that to their dog.The nephew(16) started to horse around with the dog.Well lets just say the dog didn't know when to stop.No he didn't get hurt,but it was close and it could have gotten nasty.

Karin
May 20th, 2004, 10:45 PM
Ciara has more toys than I ever had in my entire childhood! I admit, I am slightly jealous. Just like any kid she prefers a towel. Simple dish towels or even bath towel's...we play tug of war, only we call it, "fleas gonna getchu".
She has one towel in the living room & one on her bed.

She is still a goober too.

Luba
May 21st, 2004, 12:00 AM
Most dogs love tug of war! Chloe may very well be a dog that you have been able to train to let go of an object.

But what tug of war does is teach a dog that it's okay to be aggressive with your hands. Anything that you are holding is an extention of your hands. To a dog, your hands appear like a mouth of another dog. It can also lead to dogs trying to take other things from your hands.

Your dog may know 'you' and the game well ..... but what about a young child or friend over for a visit? When is enough?

Or that kid walking by with a toy in their hand that looks similar to the tug of war game they love so much?

Personally I wouldn't use tug as a game for my dogs in any situation.

I know LR pittys love it, and maybe you feel safe in doing that with Chloe. I wouldn't advocate it though, it's too risky IMHO.

It's different if they play tug of war with an object thats not attached to your hands but say tied to a tree or post. I've seen dogs really enjoy that as well, a tether ball type of set up for them to play tug with.

Just another thought...
One of the first lines of aggressive attacks they teach 'guard' dogs or other 'working attack dogs' is the latch and tug, to bring a suspect to the ground.

Something to think about.

BTW LR Chloe is an adorable girl, I really love her face!

heidiho
May 21st, 2004, 10:50 AM
I dont play tug of war myself,just because he is already trying to be the alpha in our house,so i cant.It sucks wish i could,but i need to get the food problem fixed before anything..