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Dog-to-dog bite injury

lanwhite
August 31st, 2007, 06:27 AM
My 7-yr-old border collie, Lucy, (who weighs about 40 pounds, small for a border collie) was attacked by a Doberman today who clamped down hard on the back of her neck and wouldn't let go. Her owner finally got her away. We had to get away before he lost control of the Doberman again, but it appeared Lucy was okay except badly shaken up. She walked fine, no active bleeding though there was blood on the side of her neck, and I took her to the vet to have it checked. The vet is on vacation and won't be back until Tuesday, and the nearest other vets are about 60 miles away over mountain roads, so I thought it would be safe to wait until Tuesday.
When we got home, she got under our trailer where it is difficult to reach her or check her out more thoroughly. She didn't eat all day, but that isn't unusual when she is very upset. I finally decided that I could get her out by starting on our evening walk, which she loves. She did come out but took only a few steps before going back under the trailer...I was too far away to catch her. At that time, she walked kind of folded up, with her head down, and maybe some loss of function in her hind legs. Now I really am worried about her.
If she won't come out when it gets light, I will have to dismantle some of the skirting on the trailer and crawl in after her, and then take her to a vet as soon as they are open.
I just wondered what you could tell me in the meantime about this kind of injury. I have read on the internet that a dog could apply 200-400 pounds of pressure into its bite and it could result in a crush injury and neurological damage. It really is hard to find anything on the internet, though, about this kind of injury. I have had a background in medical terminology and figure a dog and human might have a similar musculoskeletal structure and similar injuries, and that worries me even more!

luckypenny
August 31st, 2007, 06:44 AM
Hello lanwhite, welcome to the forum.

I'm sorry to hear about Lucy's injury. I would be very worried as well. I think it would be very wise to get her to another vet for x-rays as soon as possible.

Did you get the name/address of the owner of the Doberman? I would assume that he/she would be responsible for any vet fees incurred in the treatment of your dog. Please don't delay in having Lucy seen by a vet. :fingerscr that she will be fine.

mummummum
August 31st, 2007, 12:35 PM
I agree ~ she needs to see a Vet asap. Although she may have been walking with an odd gait because she was under the trailer (I presume she can't completely stand up under there) and may have been stiff ~ better safe than sorry given the possibility of nerve or skeletal damage. And, given that there was a puncture and you weren't able to flush it right away and then it was left exposed while she was under the trailer, you may also want antibiotics.

Let us know how you make out ! :goodvibes:

punkyamberlea
August 31st, 2007, 01:39 PM
She might have some nerve damage, with edrenalin (sp) she may have been fine right after. I will try and get her out and get her looked at. Also get the name of the dobbies owner, that should be reported. Amber

lanwhite
September 1st, 2007, 01:35 AM
Today I dismantled some of the skirting on the trailer to get to her but she kept moving. As soon as I got one board off, she was gone somewhere else. This was actually a relief to me, as it showed she could at least move around okay and was fully aware of what was going on! I finally realized that she would have to come out on her own, she could move faster than I could crawl around under there, and she did not intend to get caught and let me poke around on her wounds. I think she lost a lot of faith in me too that I was standing right there and still couldn't protect her from getting hurt.
There is space for her to stand up, barely, under the trailer.

I decided to go back a stronger flashlight, so I got in my car and started it up, and then she came out. To my relief, she was walking normally and did not even walk with a limp, so it was apparently pain that caused her to walk that way yesterday instead of neurological damage. She always wants to go with me in the car wherever I go, so I thought maybe I could get her in and take her to a vet, but she got back under the trailer the minute I walked her way again.

Later on tonight, she finally came out and came inside, a little stiff getting up the two steps into the trailer but otherwise okay. She ate everything in sight and let me look at her wounds a bit and apply some Neosporin. The wounds appear very deep but missed the spinal column area and are more on the right side of her neck, although there might be more puncture wounds that I can't see. I was unable to do much, and I think it will require a vet to shave some fur there and abrade some of it, maybe under anesthesia, as it seems very painful. The little bit I could do is not nearly enough to stop any infection, and the fur at her neck is very thick and would inhibit the healing. (She is a long-haired border collie, with a thick mantel of fur around her neck).

I will call around at the vets in the area tomorrow, but since it is Labor Day weekend, I doubt if any will be available except in emergencies, and this may not be considered an emergency they would see her for. At least I will talk to them and see what they say, but it might be that I will have to see my vet Tuesday at the earliest.

The owner of the Doberman is quite poor and I'm sure could not pay anything toward the vet bill. Maybe I will buy him a good leash for the next time he takes them out for a walk. She has a brother who is a good friend of Lucy's, he is a gentle dog. We go by their house every time we take a walk along the nature trail. The two dogs always ran free over a wide area and created trouble, killing deer for the fun of it (or at least she did), but lately they have been tied up. The owner said she had not done anything like that before, but I have a feeling he didn't voluntarily restrain them from running loose...he was asked by law enforcement to do so for some reason, and he was just taking them for a rare walk. They see Lucy taking walks every day and maybe that's why the Doberman hates Lucy so much. We can and probably will vary our route so as to not go by their place again in the future. I hesitate to report this because it might mean the end of all walks for them, and that would be sad. I just want a leash put on her so it doesn't happen again. I also know that once she has gotten the best of Lucy she won't hesitate to do it again. So, I don't know what to do about them.

Their owner is a bit of a mess. He has himself gotten into trouble with police, mostly for drinking related problems, and is hardly able to manage himself much less his animals. He allows four horses to run free too, and he is always being reported for that. Except for that, he does take care of them (feeding and watering them, etc.).

mummummum
September 1st, 2007, 11:31 AM
I'm glad she finally came out from under the trailer and that there doesn't appear to be any nerve damage. Hhunger is a huge motivator isn't it ? While you are no doubt right about the Vet bill, you should probably ask to see the Doberman's rabies innoculation certificate. I hope you are able to find a Vet today ~ I'd worry about infection along with the pain factor.

You are in a tough position if the owner is that negligent, law enforcement have already given them warnings. There's a good chance the animals will be apprehended if you report the owner. Only you know the circumstances and will have to decide if that is in the dogs' best interest to be removed from the environment. What's the dog rescue movement like in Idaho ? is there a Doberman-specific group ? Perhaps you could discreetly leave them the information in their mailbox. If you think they respond to the riot-act being read to them with ultimatums about becoming a responsible dog owner that's also a thought. Or if this person has any reasonable-minded friends in or around your neighbourhood, maybe you could appeal to them for help in dealing with this person.

Keep us posted !

glasslass
September 1st, 2007, 09:28 PM
In this type of injury, often the skin is pulled away from the underlying lean muscle of the neck. Very painful. A vet will often run a drainage tube under the skin from a puncture wound on one side of the neck and out a puncture wound on the opposite side of the bite. This allows accumulating fluids to drain, prevents swelling, and the injured tissues are able to heal. You have to keep the site cleaned by swabbing with a hydrogen peroxide/water solution because of the open wound. After the wound heals from the inside out, the tube is removed (easily) and the punctures heal. The dog will also get oral antibiotics. Sounds icky, but will heal nicely.

This was my baby 3 years ago with a similar injury. The second photo was taken a week later.

lanwhite
September 2nd, 2007, 03:40 PM
I was not able to see any vet this weekend so will have to wait until Tuesday. Lucy is back to normal now in every way except for the wounds, no pain at all it seems.
We took a walk along the same route as always yesterday, me armed with a big stick, and she was fine with it, not even any nervousness, and eager for the walk. So now the only thing will be to control the infection, which the vet will have to do, since she won't allow me to do anything beyond a quick inspection. The area seemed to be itching yesterday, which I know indicates some healing, and she started to scratch them but quit because that apparently hurt. After she sees the vet, I imagine I will have to do something to prevent scratching while it heals. I know an abscess can form when the healing takes place on the surface, and there are smaller areas that look like the photo you posted, nothing as large as that. The thick fur may have helped prevent even worse injuries.
I don't think it is in the best interest of the other dogs to take them from their owner. Someone else might better train them, but they do have a close relationship with the owner, it appears. And I wouldn't want them to be constantly tied up without any walks at all. (The owner was about as shaken up as we were and constantly apologized...he may not dare take them out again, and that would be sad.)
I don't think there are any Doberman rescue groups around this part of Idaho...it's kind of remote from everything, surrounded by national forest, so there isn't much available for anything. The dogs also don't have any near neighbors...there is a large area with woods, river, and meadows, what we call "Indian land" (owned by tribal members and left undeveloped. Next to that is the town's nature trail, which is where we take walks. We are on an Indian reservation, the owner is a tribal member, and he lives on that land off by himself. This also presents a cultural factor, as the Indians here don't like fencing or tying anything up anyway...his attitude is more in tune with that than it is negligence, and I can sympathize with that. Even law enforcement usually looks the other way unless the animal is a problem or in danger, so that makes me wonder why they made him tie them up in the first place.)
Thanks for your help and concern for Lucy...it at least helped me not to feel so alone with this. I will let you know what the vet says on Tuesday. That will be a real relief to get it taken care of!

chico2
September 2nd, 2007, 03:51 PM
Ian,I did not comment since I had no advice to offer,I just admire your compassion for this man and his dogs,often everything is not just black/white,hopefully everything will be ok with Lucy:pray:

lanwhite
September 2nd, 2007, 08:32 PM
That's easy to forget sometimes that not everything is black and white. I wish it were this time...that the dog was really vicious by nature and should be put down or that the owner was cruel to his dogs and they should be taken away...then I would have no problem reporting it. I sympathize with the dogs who once were free to roam everywhere they wanted and now are chained all day, then seeing my happy dog running free the way they remember doing. The nature trail is an area where dog owners allow their pets to run without a leash and we've had no problems. The dogs seem happy just for a chance to run and meet their friends on the trail. (My dog has more friends than I do!) But the Doberman sees this going on all the time and must hate us all for it! And her owner just wanted to take them for a happy run too. It just didn't work out right, that's all, and I can't say it was anyone's fault.

lanwhite
September 2nd, 2007, 08:38 PM
I like your cat, by the way...a real beauty.

hazelrunpack
September 2nd, 2007, 08:49 PM
Ian--just a thought. I've found that a 50-50 solution of vinegar and water in a spray bottle (a simple mister for indoor plants will do) is very effective in getting a dog's attention. If you get a small bottle and fill it with the mix, it would be easy to carry with you on a walk. Just spray it in the face of an attacking dog. If you accidentally spray your own dog, too, no real harm done--stings the eyes a bit and they hate the smell--but it could very well cause the other dog to break off an attack before you have to resort to a stick. :shrug: Worth a try anyway?

I'm happy to hear that Lucy is feeling better! :grouphug: Good luck at the vet on Tuesday--with luck, the wounds are neither deep nor infected! :fingerscr

lanwhite
September 2nd, 2007, 08:53 PM
Thanks, I didn't know that and will give it a go! I know a lot of dogs will back off if you show them a stick, but it could work the other way too! Glad to know about the vinegar.

mummummum
September 2nd, 2007, 09:51 PM
I'm so glad Lucy is seemingly on the mend. Fingers crossed that no infection sets in and she just keeps on healing physically and emotionally. :fingerscr

t.pettet
September 2nd, 2007, 10:05 PM
Perhaps a muzzle would enable the doberman some freedom while protecting other dogs from attacks.

mummummum
September 2nd, 2007, 11:08 PM
Perhaps a muzzle would enable the doberman some freedom while protecting other dogs from attacks.

True enough ~ as long as it is a basket-style muzzle so that the Dobie can still pant. Hopefully the owner would understand that it couldn't be left on longer than their walk along in the neighbourhood as the Dobie would still need to get a drink periodically.

lanwhite
September 3rd, 2007, 12:01 AM
A muzzle is a great idea! I'd be willing to buy one for him, then we'd all win.

lanwhite
September 4th, 2007, 07:32 PM
I called the vet to make an appointment today and discovered he was STILL on vacation! So I finally was able to take her to another one.
Lucy is usually very good at the vets but not today. The problem came with the shaver. A nurse had to be called in to help me hold Lucy down while the vet worked, and Lucy gave it her best effort to get away from us and almost managed to do so several times! Once he had the hair all shaved away, we saw just how gross it was! The first thing we noticed was the smell, and then the maggots feeding on dead skin! (I SAID it was gross!)
There was a main gash that was very much deeper than I expected and very extensive, and several other smaller puncture wounds, some close to her throat. It took a long time to clean out the dead skin and remove the hair in the wounds so it could heal. It was infected, as I expected it would be, but once he had cleaned the wound it looked as if it would drain by itself, and he said it should heal okay. I am supposed to clean it once in awhile, now that I can see what I'm doing and keep it open to prevent abscesses. He gave her a shot and sent me home with antibiotics. He said it was a good thing I brought her in today.
By the way, he weighed Lucy at 32 pounds, smaller than the 40 pounds a few years ago. I think I will get her weighed every time I see the vet now, which haven't been doing. I think the Doberman must have weighed close to 80 pounds!
I do hope it will not be a great struggle to clean her wounds every day, otherwise I will have to find someone to help me do it!

lanwhite
September 4th, 2007, 07:38 PM
I called the vet to make an appointment today and discovered he was
STILL on vacation! So I finally was able to take her to another one.
Lucy is usually very good at the vets but not today. The problem came with the shaver. A nurse had to be called in to help me hold Lucy down while the vet worked, and Lucy gave it her best effort to get away from us and almost managed to do so several times! Once he had the hair all shaved away, we saw just how gross it was! The first thing we noticed was the smell, and then the maggots feeding on dead skin! (I SAID it was gross!)
There was a main gash that was very much deeper than I expected and very
extensive, and several other smaller puncture wounds, some close to her
throat. It took a long time to clean out the dead skin and remove the hair
in the wounds so it could heal. It was infected, as I expected it would be,
but once he had cleaned the wound it was obvious that it would drain by
itself, and he said it should heal okay. I am supposed to clean it once in
awhile, now that I can see what I'm doing and keep it open to prevent abscesses. He gave her a shot and sent me home with antibiotics. He said it was a good thing I brought her in today.
By the way, he weighed Lucy at 32 pounds, smaller than the 40 pounds a few years ago. I think I will get her weighed every time I see the vet now, which I haven't been doing. I think the Doberman must have weighed close to 80 pounds!
I do hope it will not be a great struggle to clean her wounds every day, otherwise I will have to find someone to help me do it!

hazelrunpack
September 4th, 2007, 07:54 PM
Maggots look awful, but they can be very beneficial--they eat away the dead tissue and allow the wound to heal. It was maybe a very good thing that she was getting some maggot help. :o Gross as it is. :yuck:

I'm glad to hear that Lucy has gotten some help and some meds! :thumbs up Best wishes for a speedy recovery for the poor darlin! :fingerscr (And I hope she doesn't make wound cleaning too traumatic for you! :grouphug:

mummummum
September 4th, 2007, 08:18 PM
While it's shaved you should take a few pictures of it ...just in case you need to rely on this incident in the future. One never knows what might happen and if there is a second incident, you may not be feeling nearly as compassionate towards the owner and the Doberman as you do now. :2cents:

What did the Vet give you to flush the wounds?

lanwhite
September 5th, 2007, 01:59 AM
Please, someone delete the double post again. It happens when I edit my post, for some reason.
He said to wipe it out with a clean wet rag with maybe a little detergent with it and I could use Neosporin too. It is going to be a nightmare getting her to cooperate with this, but I know I do have to keep it open or spend a lot of money on drain tubes.
I was thinking the same thing about the maggots...I know they do eat dead flesh, and there was a lot of it. I have heard of maggots being deliberately used in medicine for that purpose, although I would cringe at something eating away on me! By the way, Lucy didn't even have a fever, another good sign.
Yes, the photos will be a good idea for tomorrow. I really need a 3D effect to get the full picture of what it's like! Like I said, it looks a lot worse than what I thought before he shaved it. He also said there were two more Doberman attacks on other dogs lately...wonder if it was the same dog. I haven't seen that many Dobermans around, and with the Dobie's owner suddenly tying them up, I'm real suspicious of it.

chico2
September 5th, 2007, 07:12 AM
Ian,hope Lucy will recover quickly and no drains are needed:pray:
I would hate the idea that this could happen again and if,like your vet says, it's happened several times to other dogs,maybe it's time to have a serious talk to this owner.
He was probably lucky he had to deal with you and not someone else.
I can understand your compassion for a lonely man,but if his dog might kill or seriously maim another,the risk is too great,IMO.

hazelrunpack
September 5th, 2007, 12:47 PM
That was good news about there being no fever. She's fighting the infection well, then. :thumbs up

Did you have any luck with your first attempt at cleaning the wound? :fingerscr We're rootin' for ya! Uncooperative pooches can be the :evil: to minister to! :grouphug: :o

Oh, and I think you can delete your own duplicate post--use the Edit button at the bottom of the post, then click on the "Delete this message" button that shows on the screen that comes up. (It's near the top.) :thumbs up

Longblades
September 5th, 2007, 01:53 PM
I suggest that even though you appear to have now found the site of the wound and dealt with it that you still keep a close watch on Lucy for signs of other damage. Our ESS was attacked by two teams of Siberian huskies and also seemed just badly shaken up. There were no visible bite wounds and she was stiff and sore the next few days just as your Lucy. But a month later she began SCREAMING in pain. Our Vet suspected a broken neck and sent us to a specialty Vet who could not find a sign of a break. Both Vets now believe the husky attack pinched a nerve (that would not show up on xray) and caused our poor little girl excruciating pain. Of the month delay between attack and screaming, they said that can happen. Our dog recovered but the pain returned periodically for years after, though not as badly. Out Vet believes some kind of damage was done to the vertebrae of her neck and the occasional wrong twist the wrong way made it hurt again.

growler~GateKeeper
September 6th, 2007, 12:22 AM
I'm very glad Lucy is doing okay & you were able to get her in to the vet but I'm concerned by this:
He said to wipe it out with a clean wet rag with maybe a little detergent with it

Not sure what detergent you are using but even antibacterial hand soap can be very drying esp for animal skin.

The vets' office should have a product they use in-clinic called "Hibitane Soap" this is used for cleaning wounds, pre surgical cleaning, it is very good antibacterial etc, it can be used in small amounts (it is strong) either straight or you can dilute it a bit with water - this is the best way so it doesn't dry out the skin. The vet should either give you some to use or sell it to you.

I used to buy a small bottle (they get it in huge bottles & can just put some in a little one for you) from my vet when I had Cally :rip: :dog: for cleaning his wounds from excessive feet washing (to the point of open sores :rolleyes:).

lanwhite
September 6th, 2007, 09:48 PM
It took me a while to finally maneuver Lucy onto the injured side...she was NOT cooperative about that in a purely passive-aggressive way (i.e. 32 pounds suddenly turned into 180 pounds through sheer force of will!), but when I finally did get her in position to see it, she let me do what I wanted. Nothing seems painful except the largest gash where there is a pocket where the skin has pulled away and formed a kind of flap...that's the best way I can describe it. She wouldn't let me do much with that one except swipe it once and put Neosporin on it. I didn't use detergent on them but just used a wet rag and then put in some Neosporin after cleaning it. Except for the largest gash, though, it was scabed over, so I tried to get that back open again. I picked out a little more fur from one. Today it seemed the swelling was quite a bit down from yesterday, there still does not seem to be any fever, and I am giving her 1/2 an antibiotic pill twice a day in hamburger or cheese. It is obviously itching, so she rolls in the dirt to see if that helps, and that is a problem keeping dirt out. I haven't cleaned it yet today but will again in a bit. It is not draining, so I'm thinking I might have to take her back in to get it draining? When my regular vet is back I think I will get it checked again in any case, even if it seems to be doing well. He is here only on Tuesdays and Thursdays and is the only vet in town.
I wonder if there is a way to keep it from itching as it heals? I will also ask him for that Habitane soap...thanks.
Now that she knows what the game plan is, Lucy may not be as cooperative tonight. I may take her to the vet who treated her tomorrow to ask him to look at it again, just to be safe....I don't like that it isn't draining, but maybe it is okay. I just don't feel confident judging it myself.
I have been approaching the nature trail from a different direction until today when I went past the other dogs' home again. It does not appear that they are there any more. They are not tied up and not home loose, so either they are inside or gone. I am still carrying a big stick, in either case. My nephew is the county sheriff, so I may talk to him, and he can find out also about the other attacks in the area to see if this dog was responsible. I hope they have gone but will let him find out what he can and advise me on the best thing to do. Now that I know there have been other Doberman attacks in the area that this one might have been involved in, I may find my sympathies have been misdirected. It could be she wasn't involved with the others, but there arn't that many Doberman's here that I know about.
Longblades, that is awful! I did worry about nerve or spinal damage until we saw that there didn't appear to be any bites near the spinal column, but that doesn't mean it can't still show up later.

mummummum
September 6th, 2007, 10:01 PM
Ian I'm fairly certain you can buy Hibitane in the drug store. Look for it in the acne face soap section ~ it's an anti-bacterial but I'm pretty sure I've found it there (at least here in Ontario, I can find it there). Teraseptic is a similar product.

Keep us posted on her progress.

lanwhite
September 6th, 2007, 10:49 PM
Thank you...I will try to find one of them in the drug store!

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/lanahi/Lucy.jpg
Hope this works...this is Lucy after a swim.

markwyoming
September 7th, 2007, 12:29 AM
My dog was attacked (not too badly) by a Pit Bull the other day, in front of an Insurance Agency of all places, in Monterey CA. The sight of the Pit Bull attacking my beta female Chocolate filled me with so much rage I kicked the dog in the ribs as hard as I could... I cant imagine what I would have done to the dog and owner if it had been my child the dog decided to attack. I am taking in my pet tomorrow to have the draining on her wounds performed by the vet, and guess who will be paying? Not me.

Do not show sympathy toward this persons dog... or them if they are poor. Being poor doesn't directly correlate to being stupid does it? I am TOTALLY in favor of putting a bullet between the eyes of any pet that decides to attack (even my own if it came to it) and a baseball bat to any negligent owner head. We have enough dogs in this world... we can afford to lose the vicious ones.

Report the dog to animal control that attacked your Collie NOW!!! Who knows, next time it may be someone's baby girl or boy?

chico2
September 7th, 2007, 07:41 AM
Awww Ian,Lucy is a sweetheart,:pray: she will be fine..
Let's hope this Dobie is gone,nobody walking their dog should have to be afraid of an attack.

Love4himies
September 7th, 2007, 08:20 AM
Lucy is soo cute! Hope her wounds will heal nicely!

Longblades
September 7th, 2007, 09:56 AM
I have to say that I certainly agree with markwyoming that this incident should be reported to the authorities. If all of us fail to report a first incident we are just allowing a possible first incident to occur again with someone else's dog, or worse, child. We were guilty of this with another problem with a neighbour's HUGE dog and eventually discovered that is exactly what happened - several other neighbours had also had that "first incident". And three of those were with children. Only one was an actual bite but when a 120lb. dog is harassing you it isn't smart to wait for the bite before you report.

In our husky attack we did report and found that many, many other people were having trouble with dog-sledders at the particular multi-use area and the authorities, one of whom was a work colleague of the DH, were just hoping and waiting for a formal, written complaint so they could do something about it.

lanwhite
September 8th, 2007, 12:39 PM
I have talked to my nephew about it (the county sheriff) and showed him the bites. He will find out more about it and let the town Marshall know as well. This will get more action than anything else, coming from him, and I will be able to find out more about this Doberman. I'll make a formal report if they need one. The dogs still don't appear to be there anymore, but I'm sure I will hear more about what's happened to them as soon as he's looked into it. I agree now about reporting it.
Lucy's wounds are looking better every day now. I'll take her in next Tuesday to have my vet look at it anyway. She was more cooperative about my treating it last night, so it must make her feel better too.
Has anyone ever mixed a pure form of DMSO with antibiotic cream? I did that once with a ferral cat with an abscess that I knew I could never get to a vet, and it worked very well. The DMSO makes the antibiotic soak in through the skin, and that is something they do with horses. I do not have any DMSO and probably won't use it this time but wondered if it was safe to use on dogs.

hazelrunpack
September 8th, 2007, 02:06 PM
I'm glad you reported the incident, Ian. :thumbs up

Lucy is a doll! :lovestruck:

In answer to your question: yes, DMSO is safe to use on dogs. However, you have to be careful what you use it with. Some of the cream's components could be toxic if absorbed into the bloodstream, and should NOT be applied with DMSO. So best to ask a vet before using DMSO with any antibiotic cream.

lanwhite
September 9th, 2007, 12:53 PM
Good point about the cream, Hazel.
Nephew said no Doberman attacks were reported to the sheriff's department but in this case it would be an issue for the tribal police, and there were no reports there either. The dogs are no longer there.

BabyJessy
September 9th, 2007, 01:54 PM
Your dog is just beautiful and I am sorry that you both had this bad experience. My little Pom was attacked by a 165-pound German Shepard about a month ago. She was being walked on her leash and the loose dog just jumped out into the street, grabbed her by her lower back and shook her like a plush toy. We rushed her to our vet hospital and they took x-rays, blood tests, and even an ultrasound (to see if her bladder had been touched). Thankfully, there was no damage except the puncture wound which has completely healed. We did send a letter along with the bill by registered mail to the owner. In the letter we stressed that his dog is aggressive and should be in a fenced yard or leashed at all times. We also told him that we have not called the authorities because we trust that he will take precautions so this never happens again. We were happy to have given him a chance because he did show up at our house a few days later, apologizing profusely, handed us the money for the vet bill, and shook our hands. He was obviously upset by whole situation, so we were happy we gave him the opportunity to make things right.:thumbs up

Now however, we are quite nervous when we see a large loose dog approaching our Pom rather aggressively (head-on) and we have lunged at one (twice) in the past 2 weeks to avoid a possible attack. What is wrong with people? We end up looking crazy because we are protecting our Pom from large loose dogs! This should not be.....

Hope everything works out and I sympathize with your situation. You must have been so worried while the days passed without a vet consultation! I suffered for 4 hours and it was pure anguish!

Living in a remote area you may want to invest in a good vet guide. At least you will have a guide to help you in emergency situations. And it will suggest meds to keep on hand when maggots are not available!!!!

Take care!

:grouphug:

lanwhite
September 10th, 2007, 03:39 AM
Yeah, I was pretty worried! It seems to be healing nicely now. I'm glad your Pom recovered as well.
I let Lucy run and play off leash on the nature trail, but at least I am with her constantly, and now I have that big stick! She always comes when I call her, reluctantly sometimes, and never gets out of sight. I don't understand people who let their dogs roam by themselves either, for their own dog's sake as well as others. Laziness probably. There are times when I really don't want to go for walks either, but I do because she needs them, and we both end up having a good time anyway. The vet thinks she's part Springer Spaniel, and that could be true. She runs and jumps straight up and down like she was on a pogo stick, seeing what she can flush up. It's hysterical...boing, boing, boing! She's so gentle and never hurts anything, so I love watching her antics, and she seems to enjoy making everyone laugh.
I've thought about getting a good vet manual but usually spend time on the computer instead. I have a Mercks Veterinary Manual, which I have difficulty reading sometimes even as a retired medical transcriptionist, and it doesn't cover everything.
Anyone have good advice for the most complete vet manual?

mummummum
September 10th, 2007, 08:59 PM
I don't think there is one Ian. I have four or five different books here including a Merck and I rely pretty heavily on the different Vet websites on the net.

lanwhite
September 12th, 2007, 12:48 PM
Anyone else have a good vet manual to recommend?

Took Lucy in for a check-up and he said she was doing well.:o

chico2
September 12th, 2007, 03:49 PM
Ian,that's great glad she's recovering,when you said she goes boing,boing,boing :laughing:I had this picture in my mind:laughing:

lanwhite
September 13th, 2007, 02:25 AM
I truly don't know how she does it...exactly like springs on her feet, straight up and down even when she's running, and everyone laughs to see it! This little dog has given me more laughs than I ever have had before!

chico2
September 13th, 2007, 06:58 AM
Ian,my cats used to jump like that when we had grasshoppers in the backyard,the funniest thing:laughing: