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Diabetic cat - still vomits

dustysmom
July 12th, 2007, 10:37 AM
:confused: My diabetic cat, Smudge, sometimes vomits after eating. She goes through dry spells, then she'll throw up several times in a row after meals. Also, she'll keep eating as long as there is food available. When she's finished her food, she'll push the other cats out of theirs to eat more. She is very bony in the spine and hips and has a belly on her.

She has had bloodwork to get her insulin dose adjusted in the past. I believe it's supposed to be once a year. I don't know if her vomiting is my fault because sometimes her shots are not given exactly 12 hours apart - it fluctuates betwee 10 and 13 hours because of when I get home from work.

My dilemma is that my husband wants to have her put down because of all the vomiting and expense involved with the medication and vet. Smudge is about 12 or 13 yrs old but doesn't act like a "senior" cat.

krdahmer
July 12th, 2007, 10:57 AM
Um all I can think of is that because she eats so ravenously she may just be regurgitating the food, I have one that does this on occassion but is not diabetic. And as for the overeating, you may have to just feed her seperately from the others like in the bathroom or another room where her intake can be closely monitored, maybe even do smaller meals more often. And maybe see your vet to check the dosage even though it may not be time yet.

Oh and tell hubby to go pound salt! ;)

And if heaven forbid he ever wins that arguement try to find another home that would be willing to take care of her first.

Dr Lee
July 12th, 2007, 11:27 AM
Dustysmom,

I agree with you, euthanasia isn't a reasonable option at this point. My goal is to get all my feline patients to 20 years of age, so at 12/13 we still have a long way to go!

I like krdahmer's suggestions. If that doesn't resolve it then, I would be concerned. One of the underlying diseases which can cause diabetes is chronic pancreatitis. If that is still present, it may be a cause for vomiting. Kidney impairment, high stomach acidity, liver, etc.... the list is long:sad:

But irregardless, if the vomiting continues I would at least talk to your veterinarian. if you want to try something inexpensie, ask your veterinarian about a pepcid or tagamet trial. Or see if she/he as any other inexpensive options to try.

Good luck:pawprint:

sugarcatmom
July 12th, 2007, 12:31 PM
Hi there,

How long has Smudge been diabetic? What type and dose of insulin is she on, and also, what is she eating? The reason I ask is because you say she's bony, which might be because she isn't as well regulated as she could be. A diabetic really needs to have bloodwork done more than once a year, and blood glucose should be checked considerably more than that (I do it at least twice a day, before giving my cat his shot). Did you know that you can actually check blood glucose at home with the same glucose monitor that people use? It's just a quick lancet prick on the edge of the ear, not at all painful, and considerably easier than having to take Smudge to the vet all the time. If you're interested in trying it, I can send you some video links that show how.

The other huge factor in diabetes treatment is food. A low-carb canned food is best. If pancreatitis is suspected, a low fat one is also recommended. But, please do not make any diet switches without first figuring out how to home-test your cats bg, and of course consulting with your vet. Changing from a high carb food to a low carb one can dramatically reduce insulin requirements and result in hypoglycemia if insulin isn't adjusted accordingly.

Now, having said all that, it's an absolute must that you go to this website: http://felinediabetes.com/ Everything you could ever possibly want to know about feline diabetes is covered there. The message board has a huge number of very knowledgeable members, some who have treated their diabetic cats for 10 years or more, and they would love to help you out.

Let us know how it goes. Vomiting in a cat with diabetes is definitely a concern, especially since it can impact insulin needs.

dustysmom
July 12th, 2007, 01:12 PM
Thank you for all the responses, and Thanks Sugercatmom for the website referral. I'm off now to check it out.

I need to take our dog to the vet so Smudge will be tagging along too!!

krdahmer
July 12th, 2007, 05:51 PM
Oh and welcome to the site, do you have any pictures of your furbabies.

ellendar
August 7th, 2007, 03:51 PM
:confused: My diabetic cat, Smudge, sometimes vomits after eating. She goes through dry spells, then she'll throw up several times in a row after meals. Also, she'll keep eating as long as there is food available. When she's finished her food, she'll push the other cats out of theirs to eat more. She is very bony in the spine and hips and has a belly on her.

She has had bloodwork to get her insulin dose adjusted in the past. I believe it's supposed to be once a year. I don't know if her vomiting is my fault because sometimes her shots are not given exactly 12 hours apart - it fluctuates betwee 10 and 13 hours because of when I get home from work.

My dilemma is that my husband wants to have her put down because of all the vomiting and expense involved with the medication and vet. Smudge is about 12 or 13 yrs old but doesn't act like a "senior" cat.

You can try changing her to Lantus the insulin that lasts for 24 hours so she is not missing a dose and change how you are feeding her get her a large dog crate and feed her exclusively in that so she isn't over eating and feed the other cats separately in a crate too. This way you can try and monitor her eating and feed her a ration only a cup of soft cat food per feeding your going to have to check with your vet for the exact amount of food according to her body weight, she might even have to be placed on a reducing diet by the veterinarian, don't give her access to the other cats food, they can all be fed exclusively in their own crates to prevent cheating on her "diet":frustrated: , it always bothers me to see fat cats that is definitely not healthy.
You have to be in control here, my brother and his wife have successfully cared for a diabetic cat for over six years and they do it with diet as well as insulin, the cat must be confined indoors or in an inescapable pen so she does not help herself to snacks like getting into the dogs food, the neighbor cats food etcetra. and her insulin is very important you cannot miss her dose but she can be changed to the Lantus which is only one shot daily, it does cost more. She might need more frequent blood work like twice annually.
Do not let your cats get fat, that is so counter productive
they need exercise, you can leash train a cat by the way it sounds cruel but then they will walk with you on a leash halters are better for cats so they don't choke or strangle like there is a risk with a collar on a cat but halters are much safer in that respect if your keeping it indoors yyou tether the cat to an anchor that it drags around an oold iron skillet works great keeps the cat in the area you want it in like in the yard supervised not in the road.
It drags that old fry pan around and then you change to a leash and the cat is voila walking on a leash the tether taught it to walk on a leash.
I used to take my cats camping with me and kept them on tethers with a fry pan while camping so I didn't lose them, once Inky got really upset when I put him in the car and he saw the chipmunks stealing his kitty kibble, his teeth were chattering but one thing good about tethering a cat to an anchor and supervising their outdoor activities that way is it gives birds and other wildlife a better chance cause we all know cats are avid and successful hunters. also when the cats eat their food let them only eat what they will consume in twenty minutes then take up the remaining food and serve no more, you might be feeding them a couple times a day this way but they will be less likely to become obese don't cafeteria feed a diabetic cat in other words don't let them have just all the dry cat food they want and leave out like huge containers of it.
Euthenizing a diabetic cat is not necessary if you work with the vet on it and switch to the 24 hour insulin.
but give your cats all the fresh water they can consume.:highfive: You just have to be a little more involved with the diabetic cat: your vet will be able to tell you how often to feed her and what amounts her food should be a high quality food like Iams Oh and adding a bit of olive oil and Brewers yeast to her food might reduce the vomiting because it can be fom fur in her tummy the olive oil helps her pass this and the nutritional yeast just helps her overall health plus makes her more resistant to parasites:usa:
2cents: just ignore your husband it is obviously your cat not his.:cat:

ellendar
August 7th, 2007, 04:25 PM
Um all I can think of is that because she eats so ravenously she may just be regurgitating the food, I have one that does this on occassion but is not diabetic. And as for the overeating, you may have to just feed her seperately from the others like in the bathroom or another room where her intake can be closely monitored, maybe even do smaller meals more often. And maybe see your vet to check the dosage even though it may not be time yet.

Oh and tell hubby to go pound salt! ;)

And if heaven forbid he ever wins that arguement try to find another home that would be willing to take care of her first.
I agree but a large dog crate makes an excellent feeding room for a cat that eeds supervised feeding, cats adjust she does not need to know it is really a dog crate anyhow.:pawprint:

sugarcatmom
August 7th, 2007, 07:00 PM
You can try changing her to Lantus the insulin that lasts for 24 hours

her food should be a high quality food like Iams

Holy run-on-sentences, Batman! Remember, punctuation is your friend. :D

I feel compelled to comment on a couple of things you've said, the first regarding Lantus. It is extremely rare for a cat to need only one shot per day with ANY insulin, even Lantus. Yes, in humans it can last 24 hrs, but cats metabolize insulin twice as fast as people do. Most cats do much better with 2 shots/day. Home testing a cat's blood glucose usually proves this.

I also disagree that Iams is a high quality food, especially where diabetics are concerned. It tends to have too many grains and a higher carbohydrate content than necessary for any feline diet. Not to mention the whole petfood recall fiasco! There are many better brands out there, like Wellness, Nature's Variety, Innova, Wysong, Felidae, Merrick, Precise, and even some of the glutten-free Fancy Feast flavours.

You're definitely correct about not leaving down an endless bowl of dry food though. It is possible to allow for some modified free-feeding with a diabetic, but only if it's canned food and the insulin used is one of the gentler, longer-lasting ones (not Humulin N or Caninsulin). Either way, one of the biggest assets in diabetes management is being able to home test your own cat's blood: http://www.felinediabetes.com/bg-home-test.htm