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Won't Come When Called

Linda M.
July 9th, 2007, 03:16 PM
Chef is an 11-month-old Boxer and a great dog in every way. But he's got a stubborn streak and sometimes he refuses to listen to a command even though he knows darn well what's expected of him. When we're at the dog park and it's time to go home, he just won't listen when we tell him to come. He just keeps running and playing and ignoring us but we can tell, he knows he's getting the better of us. He's definitely a parttime Alphadog! Any suggestions out there? Thanks.

PetFriendly
July 9th, 2007, 05:01 PM
Two things... The first is start thinking of a new recall word... The second, once you've figured out your new word, don't use it EVER unless you know for sure the dog is going to come to you. Lots of people make the same mistake, I know I did. Our new recall word is FRONT. :D

Right now, the dog has figured out that he can choose not to come when called, and there is nothing you can do about it. So, take training back to step one, put him a on a leash and show him what's expected when you use your new word. Besides that, enrolling in an pbedience class helps your dog learn that commands are to be obeyed in all situations, even ones where there are lots of distractions.

Linda M.
July 9th, 2007, 10:53 PM
Thanks for the advice.. Chef has been to obedience school. He's just stubborn which is a typical Boxer trait. The new command word sounds like a good idea. I will start on that tomorrow. In fact, I will train him with the new word at the dog run because that's where he is disobedient. I'll let you know how we've done. :fingerscr :D

Crestedcrazy
July 9th, 2007, 11:49 PM
I would also like to suggest using a long line and doing a training session every day maybe even a couple :)

put the long line on him make him sit/stay then go a few feet call him happily but firmly and if he doesn't listen pull him towards you, whne he does listen praise him give a training treat if you like, I prefer not to use treats myself but some people do use them.

I would also suggest the NILIF system http://k9deb.com/nilif.htm

he needs to be taught that your alpha [I]all the time[I] then you also stand a better chance of him listening to you with the recall command which that and stay are imo the 2 most important for safety reasons as well as good canine behaviour!

Good Luck and remeber you just have to be more stubborn than he is! Dogs are very smart it won't take that long I bet :thumbs up

sugarcatmom
July 10th, 2007, 01:26 PM
Part of the problem probably has to do with the fact that he knows if he comes to you when you call him out at the dog park, it means he has to go home and his fun-time is over. To him, that's punishment. You might want to incorporate a high-value reward like something really tastey that he only gets during training sessions, and practice his recall. Start in a less distracting environment (backyard?), without a leash, and gradually work your way back up to the highly stimulating dog park. At that point, call him over to you frequently throughout his playtime, give him the treat, and then let him continue playing some more. He'll be less likely to associate "coming when called" with "no more fun". You can also check out some other training tips on this website: http://www.dogstardaily.com/

Ford Girl
July 10th, 2007, 02:07 PM
At 11 months he is going thru adolecence!! Trust me, I know all about that! LOL! So do most puppy owners here. They say during this time they shouldn't be off leash and that you need to go back to step one with all training, even if they know it, it reinforces your status as the leader.

There is a whole tread on this board that I started called "OMG, we have a teenager on our hands" that many memebers have posted on, all simular stories about pups that age...not just off leash issues but attitude...

http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=39640&highlight=OMG+Teenager

We have been working on this for months now, it's getting better, much better. Until I get a better success rate with my recall Dazy is on a 30' line, even out at camp. I call once and let her make the decision, if she choses to ignore me I reel her in, make her sit or down, and wait until I release her, she comes now about 90% of the time. I also found I talked to her too much while off leash, and I was told by my trainer to stop calling her so much, I only call her now if I really need her to come back, but this was after 2 months on a drag line, I also started using different words when offleash so it's not always come, I say wait and she stops, let's me catch up and keeps going, it's as good as a come when you just want them close to you, I train every night with her, from 10 - 30 minutes each session, lots of loose leash training, down-stays, eye contact, manners!!!! The improvment I have seen helped me get thru the "OMG, we have a teenager on our hands" inital panic stag! LOL!

It was alot of work the first time around, the second time around they know the basics, you are just reminding them to respect you. If you work hard on it, it will get easier!

PetFriendly
July 10th, 2007, 04:38 PM
Before having fun time at the park, practice everything you learned at obedience, do it command at least 5 times, and mix them up so they aren't in a predictable order. Make you sure praise lots each time he does something right. This will set the tone for the rest of the play time, as he will be more inclined to listen if he's expecting high praise for all things he does well.

Some other words you might want to practice while at the dog park are commands like STOP and NEAR. Sometimes you don't really want he dog to come and sit at your feet, so having a few more words that allow you to either catch up or bring him in closer are helpful, then you can reserve come for when you really need it. Also, if time permits, wait for a lull in the doggy games before asking him to leave with you. Chances are, he still has steam to burn off so you might as well do it in the park!

As a side note, Charley was 2 before he was off leash at the 'off leash dog park'. Otherwise, we'd stay in leashed dog parks with a long line as mentioned, or even walk the leash free park with a leash on.

Anne25
July 26th, 2007, 01:37 PM
Our border collie mix is really good at almost everything like sitting and waiting for her food, sitting in the other room while we eat, not jumping in people when they come through the door (although she has her lapses). But we struggled with getting her to come when she was outdoors. If there was another dog around -forget about it.

We ended up buying a remote trainer (e-collar). Best decision we ever made. We don't even leash her anymore unless we are someplace where it is required by law. The trick to remote training is to understand that it is a training aid. You must treat it like any other training aid (leashes, crates, treats, whatever people use); which is to say that you have to use it correctly and with consistency. The best part about remote trainers is that they are idiot proof if you simply watch the instructional video (and quality collars will come with a detailed video) and then do exactly what the video teaches you to do.

We bought the PetSafe sports dog collar but there are other good ones out there. Our video told us to work with her twice a day for ten minutes at a time for several weeks. We saw results after the first week.

Here's a site you might find helpful: http://trainmypet.net Good luck :thumbs up

happycats
July 26th, 2007, 08:56 PM
I have been working with my neighbours dog (Buster) and I'm using the long line. I give him lots of loving when he does listen, and if he doesn't I tie him to me and walk all around, then we go back to recall. I don't want to use treats, because if he's not in the mood for treats one day he won't listen, also I want him to listen to the command out of respect not for food.

He does great!! He's such a smart puppy!:love:

LavenderRott
August 15th, 2007, 09:26 AM
Our border collie mix is really good at almost everything like sitting and waiting for her food, sitting in the other room while we eat, not jumping in people when they come through the door (although she has her lapses). But we struggled with getting her to come when she was outdoors. If there was another dog around -forget about it.

We ended up buying a remote trainer (e-collar). Best decision we ever made. We don't even leash her anymore unless we are someplace where it is required by law. The trick to remote training is to understand that it is a training aid. You must treat it like any other training aid (leashes, crates, treats, whatever people use); which is to say that you have to use it correctly and with consistency. The best part about remote trainers is that they are idiot proof if you simply watch the instructional video (and quality collars will come with a detailed video) and then do exactly what the video teaches you to do.

We bought the PetSafe sports dog collar but there are other good ones out there. Our video told us to work with her twice a day for ten minutes at a time for several weeks. We saw results after the first week.

Here's a site you might find helpful: http://trainmypet.net Good luck :thumbs up

PLEASE - PLEASE - Don't EVER use an electronic collar on a dog without the help of a professional trainer. And I don't mean the guy who says you should zap your dog until it pees all over itself!! (Yes, they are out there!)

Electronic collars are fine for fine tuning certain behaviours but they are most definately NOT needed for basic obedience work!

Let's look at it like this: Here you are, asking you dog to do something and and you say "Come". Your dog hears "ieongt". Dogs don't speak English. They never will. Sometimes, when he hears that sound, he comes to you and you give him a great scritch or a treat. Sometimes he hears that sound, but he doesn't come and goes on his merry way. Nothing happens. But then, a few minutes later (or it could be a year - dogs live in the moment, they don't understand the passage of time) you are yelling at him and getting after him for what - he has no idea.

Keep him on a leash until his recall is 100%. I have a 30' lunge line (you can get them where they sell horse supplies) that I keep my Belgian on. He has plenty of room to run and if I call him, I can correct him (on his flat collar) instantly if he doesn't want to listen.