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calcium requirements

marine's girlie
July 5th, 2007, 03:26 PM
i've been trying to find the calcium requirements, preferably in mg, for a client who wants to feed her dog a home-cooked diet (i have to take her side on this, my dr wants her on S/D--yuck!!!) all i can find is percents, but i don't know how to convert to mg and i need the approximate mg calcium required for a dog based on body weight. i figured that raw-feeders would have this information.
thanks!!!

michalisz
July 6th, 2007, 03:08 AM
Well, the simplest and cheaper calcium you can get is eggshells. Just spare the eggshells and put them in your coffe grinder or blender to become powder. Some say that you need to bake them first at 200celsium for 10 minutes.One teaspoon contains 1800mg of calcium according to many vets(pitcairn and many more).
Now in order to calculate the ca:p ratio you need to know how much phosphorous you are giving in every meal. There are some discussions for the proper ca:p ratio but in general anywhere from 1 to 2.5 : 1.(bone to meat).
You can find information for the phosphorous and all the minerals and vitamins you are feeding in this link.
http://grande.nal.usda.gov/NDL/index.html
I tried to feed this way for 3 months but i found that nothing is better than bones. I used to have a lot of diarrhea with this way so i switched to bones and raw meat and now i am doing much better.:thumbs up

Hope thats what you need. Also you have to buy pitcairn book . Its very helpful.

gypsy_girl
July 6th, 2007, 02:52 PM
I'll get the NRC standards for you for dogs, just have to find the book..

gypsy_girl
July 6th, 2007, 11:04 PM
NRC
For calcium with a bioavailability of 90%, no more than 30 mg/kg BW d
For calcium with a 40% bioavailability 65 mg/kg BW d
As an example a 15kg dog eating 1000 kcals per day would have calcium met at 1 gram per 1000 kcals
However I would caution you against using ‘regular” standards for a dog that has been prescribed SD, as it sounds like the dog has crystals. Besides providing a specific urine PH, these diets are low in CA, and also contain CA “grabbers” to catch excess CA.
It must be balanced with phosphorus and magnesium as well
Perhaps Pitcairns book may have a diet for calcium oxylate stones