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5 month old male kitten has crystals

heather17021977
June 21st, 2007, 06:35 PM
Hi everyone,

Found out Stewie had lots of crystals in his urine...why would this happen to him at such a young age? I feed them both Felidae Dry kitten food and they have a water fountain seem to drink a lot of water.

Is this something that will get really bad as he gets older?

Vet has him on meds and on Medi-Cal dry dissolution food, then they recommend Royal Canin Urinary S/O.

Will this new preventative food harm Molly? (Impossible to feed them different food).

Thanks again!

mummummum
June 21st, 2007, 06:55 PM
Not sure about cats heather but some dogs are simply prone to developing crystals/ urolithic stones. Did your vet tell you the type of crystals your kitten has ?

sugarcatmom
June 21st, 2007, 07:05 PM
Dry food is about the worst thing you can feed where crystals are concerned (it's actually the worst thing for any cat, period). If I were you, I'd switch to a grain-free canned food and ditch all kibble. Check out this site (from a vet, in case that makes it more credible): http://www.catinfo.org/

Here's an exerpt: When a cat is on a diet of water-depleted dry food, they produce a more highly concentrated urine (higher specific gravity) and they produce a lower volume of urine which means that a higher concentration of crystals will be present in the urine. This increases the chance of these crystals forming life-threatening stones. The concentrated urine and the lack of volume production is also very irritating to the lining of the bladder wall predisposing them to painful cystitis.

Please keep in mind that a cat has a very low thirst drive and is designed to get water with their food. A diet of canned food will keep a proper amount of water flowing through the urinary tract system and help maintain its health.

Hope that helps.

CyberKitten
June 21st, 2007, 07:26 PM
I call kibble and almost any dry food my cat's junk food which means they never get it. Now of course I am transitioning them from regular so called cat food to making my own food -with advice from various professionals - vets, vet nutritionists and so forth. We are prob about 2/3 through - it is never wise to just automatically stop one kind of food suddenly with cats or dogs or bunnies. Cats and bunnies especially possess digestive systems that are not as hearty as ours for example.

If you were feeding him dry food, I would stop that immediately and let him adjust to wet food.

Sometimes, though, there are more serious medical causes and your vet - ioif s/h had done a thorough exam and blood work, will probably have told you this.
UTI's (urinary tract infections) are another cause. One book I read suggests that "Two of the more common minerals that cause these crystals are struvite and calcium oxalate. Struvite is a combination of 3 minerals; magnesium, ammonium, and phosphorous. We tend to encounter this mineral combination in young adult cats. They are usually treated with diets to decrease the pH of the urine." (If you recall your chemistry or even have a pool you have to test weekly, the ph level indicates the acidity and alkalinity of any sample of fluid).

This vet text book also noted that "It has been found that the the higher the pH (the more alkaline) the greater is the tendency for struvite crystals to form. High quality cats foods help keep the pH in the acidic range, helping to prevent struvite crystals from building up. Unfortunately, this acidic (low pH) urine now predisposes cats to calcium oxalate crystals. As a matter of fact, we are starting to see these crystals more commonly than struvite. They also tend to form with excess use of cortisone. It is important to know the pH of the urine to determine the best way to prevent buildup of crystals. For an accurate determination, the pH of your cat's urine needs to be measured immediately when removed from the bladder. Getting a urine sample at home, and checking the pH later is not an accurate indicator of the true pH of the urine."

You will know your cat may have an infection if he is struggling to urinate or even had blood in his urine. And it is actually great that you caught it now because it can lead to obstruction which can be extremely serious!! Many cats do not drink enough water - which flushes out the urinary tract - so it is important to add something to his diet that will aid in that - some wet food that has a lot of water,. This text recommended that cats with struvite crystals should be fed Prescription Diet S/D for 30 days to help dissolve crystals that remain in the urinary bladder. Then they are switched to Prescription Diet C/D or Science Diet Feline Maintenance on a long term basis. I am unsure if that is wet or dry food but even if it is prescribed, I doubt I;d feed my cats much dry food!

There are many ways to prevent them from reoccurring because diet alone will not be the solution. The litter pans must be ultra clean at all times! Access to fresh water is critical and encouraging food with water in it might help a cat who does not drink enough water. Some people with elderly cats I know even use a syringe to give their cats extra water.

Good luck!!

heather17021977
June 21st, 2007, 07:33 PM
Well I figured Felidae being a premium food I couldnt go wrong.

I work Mon-Fri 9-5 so wet food really isnt option during the week...but what about during the weekend when we are typically home more often?

They didnt say what type of crystals he had...

Will his health continue to have these crystals from time to time or can I expect them to be gone...

sugarcatmom
June 21st, 2007, 09:59 PM
I work Mon-Fri 9-5 so wet food really isnt option during the week...but what about during the weekend when we are typically home more often?

Why wouldn't it be an option? I also work Mon-Fri (8-4:30), and I can still feed wet food. It's fine to leave it out, if that's what your concern is. My guy basically free-feeds on canned food: I put out one 3oz can in the morning (mixed with a couple tbsp of water) and he gradually eats it over the next few hours, then in the evening he gets another 3oz can. Easy-peasy.

krdahmer
June 21st, 2007, 11:49 PM
My brother's cat has crystals and has had overnight vet visits about 3 times so far, IV fluids and the like. They feed mostly wet food. I think it's something you have to watch them for for good once they have it. He lives a completely normal cat life, with a few spells here and there. My brother swears the episodes are brought on by stress, first was a move, second was a move and this last one was a new baby. So maybe address any stress he may have as well as changing to wet food?

And some of us do have a really hard time feeding wet, my girls refuse to eat any wet food I bring home, no matter how hungry they are, Buddy and Fagan will eat it, even watered down:thumbs up , but also like the dry, and Palomine will only eat tuna (people tuna-in water, not the cat food kind). I stress a bit over that, because I know it's important for the males to get plenty of fluids.

Anyway I'm sure your little guy will love canned food and you'll find a way to work it in to your schedule... after all they will work around yours for food...;)

heather17021977
June 22nd, 2007, 01:08 PM
Well maybe I should wait until he's done his 4 weeks on the medi-cal dry and then introduce the can food on Royal Canin Urinary S/O...

Even if I gave it to him on the weekends and not all the time would be beneficial to him right?

heather17021977
June 22nd, 2007, 01:10 PM
In terms of stress causing the crystals...Molly was in her first heat (mild, not full blown heat) when this all started...do you think he sensed something wasn't right with her and he got freaked out by it all?

sugarcatmom
June 22nd, 2007, 01:39 PM
Well maybe I should wait until he's done his 4 weeks on the medi-cal dry and then introduce the can food on Royal Canin Urinary S/O...

Even if I gave it to him on the weekends and not all the time would be beneficial to him right?

Honestly, he needs to be on the canned for more than just weekends for it to be beneficial. Perhaps if you can tell me what your hesitations are about feeding canned, I can help you. Did you check out this link yet?: http://www.catinfo.org/

heather17021977
June 22nd, 2007, 02:27 PM
I read it's not good for their teeth and they gain weight from it. They are only 5 months old so we are still free feeding (growing furbabies). Stewie is going to be a big cat (7lbs at 5 mos.), Molly is 5lbs.

Honestly, does it totally make their litterbox stink??

ancientgirl
June 22nd, 2007, 02:41 PM
Why wouldn't it be an option? I also work Mon-Fri (8-4:30), and I can still feed wet food. It's fine to leave it out, if that's what your concern is. My guy basically free-feeds on canned food: I put out one 3oz can in the morning (mixed with a couple tbsp of water) and he gradually eats it over the next few hours, then in the evening he gets another 3oz can. Easy-peasy.

I feed mine dry because of the same concern. I thought leaving canned food out all day might get icky. I do now and then give them a small can mixed with some dry food, but I've been wondering if canned might just be better for them.

Um... this is an odd question, but do you find their poop runny when they go since they eat canned food?

heather17021977
June 22nd, 2007, 02:45 PM
I was wondering the same thing! Yea it seems a bit selfish to be concerned about that but really...it's pretty gross, lol

Isn't Felidae supposed to be a premium food though (dry and/or wet)?

ancientgirl
June 22nd, 2007, 02:49 PM
I'm also mainly concerned at how good it would be for them having it be out all day. When I got Oksana they had been feeding her wet at the vet's office. I fed her wet for about a week or two after she was home, but found that after a few hours the food got kind of stale looking and sort of filmy. The dry stays good all day and fresher.

Gah! I'm so confused!!!!!

sugarcatmom
June 22nd, 2007, 03:23 PM
I read it's not good for their teeth and they gain weight from it.

Quite the opposite, actually. It's an old myth that dry food cleans teeth. You really should read that link, but here's another quote from it regarding dental issues:

Dental Disease: Long-standing claims that cats have less dental disease when they are fed dry food versus canned food are grossly overrated, inaccurate, and are not supported by recent studies. Many veterinarians are coming to the realization that this is a myth that needs to be dispelled. First, dry food is hard, but brittle, and merely shatters with little to no abrasive effect on the teeth. Second, a cat's jaws and teeth are designed for shearing and tearing meat, and cats that eat dry food grind it in a way that it ends up between their teeth. There it ferments into sugar and acid, thereby causing dental problems. Third, many cats swallow the majority of their dry food whole and thus receive minimal benefit from chewing motion. There are many factors that contribute to dental disease in the cat such as genetics, viruses, and diet. There remain many unanswered questions concerning the impact of diet on dental health, but feeding a high carbohydrate, species-inappropriate dry kibble diet is a negative factor, not a positive one. Perhaps a more effective way to promote dental health is to feed large chunks of raw meat which is what cats’ teeth are designed to chew.


Honestly, does it totally make their litterbox stink??

It might be stinky at first as their digestive tract adjusts to the different ingredients, but it should mellow out given some time. Just as an example, one of my cat's litterboxes is in an open closet in the middle of my house and most of the time I don't smell a thing when he does his business. You may just have to be quick to scoop it if he drops an occasional stink bomb. And no, poops shouldn't be runny. Again, while they adjust there might be some variation, but in the long run you should get some nice tootsie-rolls. :laughing:

As for the Felidae, their canned food is pretty good, but the dry has too many carbohydrates. Trust me, most cats don't have a problem eating canned food that's been sitting out, it's only us humans that get squeamish over stuff like that.

sugarcatmom
June 22nd, 2007, 03:30 PM
Oh ya, forgot about the question of weight:

Obesity: Obesity is an extremely common and very serious health problem in cats. For instance, overweight cats are four times more likely to develop diabetes than cats that are at an optimal weight. Obligate carnivores are designed to meet their energy needs with a high protein, moderate fat diet with little to no carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are minimally used for energy and those that are not used are converted to and stored as fat. The so-called “light” diets that are on the market have targeted the fat content as the nutrient to be decreased, but in doing so, the pet food manufacturers have increased the grain fraction, leading to a higher level of carbohydrates. Hence, many overweight cats eating these diets are still obese. These "light" products are among the most species-inappropriate, unhealthy diets available to cat caretakers. Many caretakers feed very small amounts of these diets hoping that their cat will lose weight but feeding a small amount of a diet that is inappropriate for the species is NOT the answer! The caretaker simply ends up with a crabby, overweight cat.

(See Molly’s story at http://www.catnutrition.org/obesity.html to read how this sweet cat went from an inactive obese cat that could barely walk and could not even clean herself, to a very active and happy cat simply by transitioning her to canned Wellness. Molly now runs through the house playing like a normal cat, can finally clean herself, and no longer limps.)

Molly’s veterinarian had prescribed Science Diet dry r/d for her and instructed her caretaker to feed Molly only very small portions. This is not sound obesity management advice. Science Diet r/d is an illogical and poor quality diet that contains 33 percent carbohydrates and the following - less than optimal - ingredients:

Chicken by-product meal, corn meal, powdered cellulose 18.5% (a source of fiber), corn gluten meal, chicken liver flavor, vegetable oil, taurine, L-carnitine, preserved with BHT, BHA and ethoxyquin

There are much healthier and more logical ways to address feline obesity.

ancientgirl
June 22nd, 2007, 03:37 PM
tootsie-rolls. :laughing:

LOL, one can only hope.

I'm going to the pet store on my way home and get them some canned stuff. I'll see how they do. Hopefully I can get them used to it.

chico2
June 22nd, 2007, 04:04 PM
I too am one of those cat-owners who definetly promote feeding canned,especially to neutered male cats.
You can feed him canned before you go to work,not the whole can,leave some good quality dry for feeding through the day.
When you come home from work,give him more canned..
If you keep the open can in the fridge,add a little warm water,my cats will not touch anything right out of the fridge.
I had a Maine Coon neutered male a looong time ago,his UTI was sooo bad he had to be put down at 3yrs old:sad:
In those days,the treatments we have today,were not available.
But to this day,I still remember that wonderful vets words,he simply said"Never feed a neutered male,strictly dry food"
Although in those days,there was only Purina Cat-Chow and Pussn'Boots(canned)for cats,things are very different now.

krdahmer
June 22nd, 2007, 04:36 PM
Can females get these crystals too? (Now growing concerned that none of my girls will eat ANY wet food.) And what about tuna? Palomine will only eat tuna, does that count as wet food?

TeriM
June 22nd, 2007, 04:37 PM
My maine coon mix had persistant and recurring infections. The vet did think that stress was a major factor so he was on some meds for that but they made him all quiet and withdrawn. I was feeding wellness canned with some dry as supplements.

I switched him to raw food and since then no more problems at all! I just buy the 200 gram prepackaged raw (for two cats per day) and it is just as easy as feeding regular wet canned and is about the same price as quality canned (maybe even a bit cheaper). I do mix a bit of warm water in with the raw for added liquid. They do get some "crunchies" as treats and also about a dozen as an evening bedtime snack.

My maine coone (3 years old) is a big cat (around 15 lbs) and the other cat is around the 8-9 lbs mark. I split the 200 gram pack about 110/90 and that is easily enough food for them.

sugarcatmom
June 22nd, 2007, 07:58 PM
Can females get these crystals too? (Now growing concerned that none of my girls will eat ANY wet food.) And what about tuna? Palomine will only eat tuna, does that count as wet food?

Females can get crystals, but because their urethra is larger than male cats, they don't tend to block as easily. Wet food is still better for them. Trust me, I know how frustrating it is trying to get a cat to eat wet when they don't want too, but it can be done! Took me the better part of a year with my cat Aztec, although that was complicated by the fact that he has diabetes (brought on by his life-long consumption of dry food, I might add!). Here are some Tips for Transitioning to Canned (http://www.catinfo.org/#Transitioning_Dry_Food_Addicts_to_Canned_Food_). One of the key things is not to leave dry down all day, or your cat just won't be hungry enough when you do offer the wet: For 'resistant-to-change' cats, you will need to use the normal sensation of hunger to help with the transition. For this reason, it is very important to stop free-feeding dry food. This is the first, and very critical, step. You need to establish set mealtimes. They are not going to try anything new if their bowl of junk food is in front of them 24/7.

As for tuna, nope, it doesn't qualify as canned because it's so poor in nutrition. You might be able to use it as an aid in converting over to canned, but you have to be careful that you don't create a tuna-addict. Personally, I'd steer clear of tuna and fish in general shouldn't be fed more than once or twice a week (too high in phosphorous, and some other reasons I can't remember). Anyway, persistence is key in getting them to eat canned. My mother-in-law offered her cat canned food once, and when he turned his nose up, forever proclaimed that he wouldn't eat it. She gave up way too easy.

You might also want to try offering some raw instead. Some cats that show disgust at the sight of canned actually go bonkers for raw. As TeriM said, raw really is the ultimate, and not any more difficult to feed than canned (just practice good hygiene, like you would if you were preparing your own meals).

chico2
June 23rd, 2007, 07:35 AM
Teri,in all the stores I go to,I have never seen this prepackaged raw food for cats.
Where do you get it??

sugarcatmom
June 23rd, 2007, 12:24 PM
Teri,in all the stores I go to,I have never seen this prepackaged raw food for cats.
Where do you get it??

Not Teri, but a good prepared raw food that should be widely available is Nature's Variety Raw Frozen Diet (http://www.naturesvariety.com/content.lasso?page=1430&-session=naturesvariety:46491BB70f3631D7E0sgV22030A 9). I checked their store locator (http://www.naturesvariety.com/where_can.lasso?-Token.prov=ON&r=1205947) and it looks like you can get it at a few places in Oakville:

BARK N' FITZ
3-334 Lakeshore Rd E
Oakville , ON L6J 1J6 905-842-2756

CANADIAN PET CONNECTION
1500 Upper Middle Road West Unit 5B
Oakville , ON L6M 3G3 905-847-3299
Product stocked: Raw Frozen Diets

GLOBAL PET FOOD
1011 Upper Middle Rd East, Unit 5
Oakville , ON L6A 4L2 905-339-1503

REN'S PETS DEPOT
4002 Trafalgar Rd.
Oakville , ON L6H 7B8 905-257-4611
Products stocked: Dry Kibble Diets, Canned Diets and Slow Roasted Treats

WAG-A-WAY
2136 Trafalgar Road
Oakville , ON L6J 4Z2 905-845-0526

Here's a store in Calgary (Tailblazers) (http://www.tailblazerspets.com/tailblazers_food_cats.html)that has a great selection of frozen raw diets with links to the brands they stock. Not sure if any of them are available in your neck of the woods, but Tolden Farms (http://tolldenfarms.ca/prod-retail.htm) is an Ontario based one that you should be able to find.

chico2
June 23rd, 2007, 03:36 PM
Thank's for doing the search for me:thumbs up
Ren's Pet Depot is my regular store and I live close to the rest.
I have never seen any frozen foods at Ren's though.

sugarcatmom
June 23rd, 2007, 07:21 PM
Thank's for doing the search for me:thumbs up

No problem, it's my pleasure :)

Ren's Pet Depot is my regular store and I live close to the rest. I have never seen any frozen foods at Ren's though.

Looking at the fine print, I'm thinking that Ren's might only stock Nature's Variety dry, canned and treats, no frozen: Products stocked: Dry Kibble Diets, Canned Diets and Slow Roasted Treats
Perhaps they could order some in for you, or maybe they just don't have the facilities to stock raw.

I know that a little while ago, folks in the U.S. were able to print off an online coupon for a free sample of Nature's Variety, but I'm not sure if it applies to Canadians or not. Here's the coupon link, if you want to look into it more: http://naturesvariety.com/tryit/ Aztec isn't a huge fan of their raw (too many carrots for his liking), although I do know a few cats who love it. It comes in a bag of 1oz medallions that are very convenient for thawing out and feeding just the amount you need (some brands are packaged too large, like 6oz worth, which is way more than my guy will eat before it goes bad).

ancientgirl
June 23rd, 2007, 07:32 PM
Thanks for that link. I managed to find a place near work and I'm going to have a look at what they have and talk to the people there.

I'd like to get my vet's opinion on this as well. I know lots of people these days are into the raw food, but I just want to make sure I do the right thing for my little ones.

CyberKitten
June 23rd, 2007, 07:41 PM
I am feeding my cats home made food but I am not yet ready to do raw- and I am working with a veterinarian nutritionist at a vet school. I work a 50-70 hr week - but have cat sitters who come in if I am away - and occasionally take one cat to work - (in my office but she also is a certified therapy kitty) - and always feed wet food. I can't imagine dry!! That is surely a route to an unhealthy cat!! I know some companies will tell you it helps their teeth but as was noted, this is totally false. Their teeth are cleaned like ours are - by brushing and good dental care!

I am afraid of the parasites from vertain raw foods tho I do know some people are managing fine with raw food so I'll wait and see how that goes. (I guess I am not ready to let my cats be part of an unofficial clinical trial, lol) I do feed them chicken hearts- which they devour - but I cook them not totally but enough that I hope there are no bacteria or viruses or prions. (I prob see too much at work and that has changed my mind. ) And absolutely NO beef!!!!

I have been so disgusted since this last discovery about the food from China but the fact is many cat food companies already use rendered meat - so that some cat foods actually contain the unthinkable! Dead animals PLUS all the chemicals that go with that!

ancientgirl
June 23rd, 2007, 07:56 PM
The bacteria is what really scares me. Vlad really prefers the wet, but Oksana seems to be preferring the dry. I made a steak the other day and they devoured it, and they also love chicken.

Is there a book that I can buy that will give me some correct information on what they can and cannot eat? I know certain foods are toxic to them, but I'm also afraid of getting a book that will give me incorrect information. I was listening to the morning show of my favorite radio station and they had a woman who'd written a pet cookbook. It turns out one of her dog food recipes had raisin's, which are a no no! So now I'm wondering if a book I buy will have the wrong information.

I pretty much figure meat and poultry is good for them, and of course I'd cook anything I gave them. I know pasta and rice are okay too, but what about veggies.

I'm so confused!

sugarcatmom
June 23rd, 2007, 08:02 PM
Thanks for that link. I managed to find a place near work and I'm going to have a look at what they have and talk to the people there.

I'd like to get my vet's opinion on this as well. I know lots of people these days are into the raw food, but I just want to make sure I do the right thing for my little ones.

Just a word of warning that many vets are not big fans of a raw diet. Mine isn't totally, mostly because she's worried that people will make their own without doing research and end up with something dangerously unbalanced (calcium-phosphorous ratios are very important, for instance). There is a fabulous vet clinic in Vancouver that does endorse raw, and even provides recipes to their clients: http://www.vancouveranimalwellness.com/nutrition-michael.cfm

ancientgirl
June 23rd, 2007, 08:14 PM
Isn't garlic bad for cats? Two of those recipes have garlic.

sugarcatmom
June 23rd, 2007, 09:16 PM
The bacteria is what really scares me.

You know, a cat is really built to handle raw meat. That's what they've done on their own for ages, after all. Their digestive tract is short, which doesn't give the bacteria enough time to become a problem, and it also tends to be quite acidic, not a friendly place for them to flourish. The issue with bacteria comes into play more for the humans preparing the meal. Just make sure your hands and all utensils that come into contact with the food are thoroughly washed afterwards and it shouldn't be an issue.

Vlad really prefers the wet, but Oksana seems to be preferring the dry. I made a steak the other day and they devoured it, and they also love chicken.

That's a great sign that they at least recognized fresh meat as food! Some cats are so addicted to dry that anything in any other form is dismissed as inedible, making it much tougher to convert them.

Is there a book that I can buy that will give me some correct information on what they can and cannot eat? I know certain foods are toxic to them, but I'm also afraid of getting a book that will give me incorrect information. I was listening to the morning show of my favorite radio station and they had a woman who'd written a pet cookbook. It turns out one of her dog food recipes had raisin's, which are a no no! So now I'm wondering if a book I buy will have the wrong information.

I know there are some good books out there but I can't think of them off the top of my head. I do know of a couple of great online sources with well researched recipes, vet endorsed, but they're for a raw diet, not cooked. These are a lengthy read, but I highly recommend them for anyone interested in making their own cat food:
http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.htm
http://www.catnutrition.org/foodmaking

I pretty much figure meat and poultry is good for them, and of course I'd cook anything I gave them. I know pasta and rice are okay too, but what about veggies.

I'm so confused!

Pasta and rice are actually completely unnecessary, and pasta in particular is not a good idea. Such refined carbohydrates really don't have any place in feline nutrition and can actually be harmful. Veggies (never onions!) can sometimes be incorporated, but are only useful if cooked or juiced as they tend to be undigestible in raw form. Although there is debate about this, some say you should keep the veggies to less than 10% of the recipe, which approximates what would be found in the stomach contents of the prey they'd be eating in nature. Regarding meat selection, chicken, turkey, and rabbit seem to be ideal, whereas you should stay away from pork and raw fish.

All this can indeed seem confusing! My best suggestion is that you read and research as much as you can if you're at all inclined to feed a homemade diet. You might find some contradictions out there but the more information you can draw upon, the more balanced your perspective will be.

ancientgirl
June 23rd, 2007, 09:35 PM
Thanks for the info. I'm going to check those links out and print out what's there. I just want to keep them healthy.

I love them more than I ever thought I could love anything in this world. It would kill me to know I may have done something wrong in feeding them to make them in any way ill, so yes, I want to find out as much as possible about what's best for them.

sugarcatmom
June 23rd, 2007, 09:36 PM
Isn't garlic bad for cats? Two of those recipes have garlic.

Ya, the recipes on the Vancouver site are geared more towards dogs. Supposedly they customize other recipes for your particular animal if you're a client. There is some controversy on how much garlic is okay for either cats or dogs, but it's my understanding that small amounts aren't harmful. You could always leave it out if you had your doubts. There's also this little tidbit on garlic toxicity: http://www.azmira.com/PublicationGarlicTheFacts.htm and this from PetEducation.com (http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=1&cat=1935&articleid=2414) and a message board debate on the subject at Holisticat (http://www.holisticat.com/garlic_arch1.html).

sugarcatmom
June 23rd, 2007, 10:08 PM
I love them more than I ever thought I could love anything in this world. It would kill me to know I may have done something wrong in feeding them to make them in any way ill, so yes, I want to find out as much as possible about what's best for them.

Tell me about it!! The reason I've researched this subject so much and become so passionate about it (to the point of annoyance, I'm sure my friends/family would say) is because of the health problems I've had with my two cats. Aztec (14 yrs old) developed diabetes 4+ years ago after eating dry Science Diet Light for most of his life (as per his vet's instruction). He's doing much better now that he eats a variety of canned and some raw, requiring only a small amount of insulin twice a day.

Aztec had a brother, Egypt, that was plagued with numerous issues from early on: severe urinary tract blockage from crystals when he was 2 (needed a Perineal Urethrostomy - penis removal - to survive); developed hepatic lipidosis when he was 3 which necessitated a feeding tube for 3 months; eventually became clinically obese (18 lbs) despite eating less than the daily recommended amount of diet dry food; and then died at the age of 11 from a very severe bout of inflammatory bowel disease. All of these ailments heavily influenced by diet, no doubt about it. Now that I have internet access and therefore access to a wealth of information on feline health, I've become rather obsessive about learning everything I can. As I've said many times: "If only I'd known then what I do now".

ancientgirl
June 24th, 2007, 07:43 AM
Tell me about it!! The reason I've researched this subject so much and become so passionate about it (to the point of annoyance, I'm sure my friends/family would say) is because of the health problems I've had with my two cats. Aztec (14 yrs old) developed diabetes 4+ years ago after eating dry Science Diet Light for most of his life (as per his vet's instruction). He's doing much better now that he eats a variety of canned and some raw, requiring only a small amount of insulin twice a day.

Aztec had a brother, Egypt, that was plagued with numerous issues from early on: severe urinary tract blockage from crystals when he was 2 (needed a Perineal Urethrostomy - penis removal - to survive); developed hepatic lipidosis when he was 3 which necessitated a feeding tube for 3 months; eventually became clinically obese (18 lbs) despite eating less than the daily recommended amount of diet dry food; and then died at the age of 11 from a very severe bout of inflammatory bowel disease. All of these ailments heavily influenced by diet, no doubt about it. Now that I have internet access and therefore access to a wealth of information on feline health, I've become rather obsessive about learning everything I can. As I've said many times: "If only I'd known then what I do now".

That's my worst nightmare! I'm so sorry that happened to them. But its the very reason why I'm exploring all avenues. I started feeding Vlad only dry, Hill's Science Diet to be exact. When I got Oksana she was being fed the wet formula and was advised I could start her on dry a week or so after I got her home.

But While still feeding her wet, I noticed that Vlad would immediately bolt towards her food. So I started letting him have a can now and then as well.

I leave them both plenty of water to drink throughout the day, but they only seem to drink out of one bowl, I've observed this so I know its not just one drinking all the water. But lately I've been reading this board and doing some other poking around and have been getting information about dry vs wet.

I've decided I'm certainly going to feed them more wet, I found a store walking distance from my job that sells that natural/raw food. I'm going to have a look at it tomorrow. At the very least, I can feed them some of that food and maybe in the evening give them some type of raw meat, since I'll be home and be able to throw away any uneaten meat in the alloted time. I'd still like to leave them their dry food, while I'm at work, so that I know they can snack if they're hungry throughout the day. Their still growing kitties and both keep each other active.

I've said this before and I'll say it again, I'm so glad I found this board. It's so wonderful to know there are people out there who have maybe gone through something you have or who can give you advice about something you are unsure of, because they have also experienced it or have had pets longer than you.:love: