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Help I Have A Shredder

clyde
June 3rd, 2007, 09:17 AM
I own a 8 month old spaded Bug (Boston Terrier/Pug) who will not stop chewing things that she should not like the kitchen furniture, cupboards, trim and just now the linoleum floor. She has a large selection of chew toys including rawhide bones, kong's, and super tough toys but as soon as you turn your back she starts to chew something she knows she should not. She knows she is doing wrong because once you turn to face her she runs in her kennel. I have tried scolding her, giving her time out in her kennel and putting nasty tasting things on the surface but no luck. Any ideas?

PetFriendly
June 3rd, 2007, 09:57 AM
Sounds like she's doing it for attention... Scolding her is attention, bad attention, but she doesn't seem to care. My dog was the same around that age. Turns out all he needed was more exercise. In addition to a 40 minute daily walk, we also play in the house and back yard for an hour and training, in 5 minute stretches, throughout the day. If you are pressed for time, you can combine hte trainning and the walking, because, unfortunantly, walking isn't very stimulating for the brain all on its own.

Good Luck!

mummummum
June 3rd, 2007, 12:20 PM
I think we've all "Been there, done that" on gnawing and chewing. I used bitter apple with success on the wood furniture, baseboards and doors. I agree that she likely does need more exhaustive exercise (the running and swimming kind). She may also need more in-house playtime with you and her toys, obedience practice, learning new tricks etc. When you cannot give her full supervision in home (when she sneaks off to get into "badness") maybe she needs to be happily in her kennel with a chew toy (kong stuffed with treats or peanut butter ?) but this is not to be used or seen by her as a punishment.

Spirit
June 3rd, 2007, 01:11 PM
It sounds to me like she doesn't know what her chew toys are (in which case, scolding won't help at all). Have you tried replacing what she's chewing with something appropriate? She could also be bored of the chew toys she has. Leaving 2 or 3 out and hiding the rest will help. Switch them around every few days.

kiara
June 3rd, 2007, 02:13 PM
Any dog that is so destructive in my opinion needs a dog trainer. I would really put up the money for that. A pet should be a pleasure and not a nuisance. It also probably needs more stimulation, like walks and play time.

BusterBoo
June 3rd, 2007, 02:32 PM
My Buster was like that until around 8-9 months old. I used bitter apply spray and it worked sometimes (bottom of couch was ripped off, bedroom dresser corner chewed...shoes (only the expensive ones....) I found that the best way to stop him from chewing was to keep him busy and stay on his case! Everytime he would start chewing, I would very sternly say No Chew, give him a toy or chewie and eventually he caught on. I did have to start crating him also.

He is now a yr old and understands "No" quite well.... :o most of the times.

Good luck!

PetFriendly
June 3rd, 2007, 02:39 PM
Any dog that is so destructive in my opinion needs a dog trainer. I would really put up the money for that. A pet should be a pleasure and not a nuisance. It also probably needs more stimulation, like walks and play time.

Its my opinion that a regualr training schedule, perhaps including a basic obedience class, or maybe even an agility class would be great. You don' however need to spend money on a trainer to deal with the specific issue of trainng te dog not to chew as it'll be covered in class.

papillonmama
June 4th, 2007, 10:05 AM
Good advice above. Don't forget to praise her good behaviour.If it's attention she needs, teach her that good attention is the kind that she wants.

You could also tether her to you as it would be easier to supervise.

Chewing is frustrating, there is a thread somewhere that had all the things that our dear pets have taken upon themselves to destroy, most have gotten over it. :)

Good Luck

Rainy
June 4th, 2007, 10:13 AM
Most Bostons always have something in thier mouths that they shouldn't.Rotating toys and more playtime is probably what is needed.She may also have too much freedom in the house right now.Maybe get a baby gate or 2 or keep her on a leash in the house with you.A tired dog is a good dog!More playtime!:thumbs up

clyde
June 4th, 2007, 11:49 AM
Thank you everyone for your suggestions. Right now Ali the shredder gets five 15 to 20 minute walks a day I would like to take her for longer walks but am physically unable to do so. I am starting to train her and she seems to catch on to the basic commands easily enough but I think you may have hit nit on the head when you said she is seeking attention. I will try some of your tips and let you know how it goes.

papillonmama
June 4th, 2007, 12:05 PM
You could try teaching her fetch as a source of extra in house exercise. I have a small dog and for extra exercise I throw her toy the length of my living room and kitchen. There are also mind exercise games that you could teach. I know if you do a thread search you can find ideas on this forum.

Ford Girl
June 4th, 2007, 02:13 PM
They go thru a second chewing phase with adolecence, I would research that and give your dog something else to do besides chew and if you can not supervise the pooch, they should be secured, (this is not the age to allow them full run of the house) I know this cuz my golden is going thru the same thing and is almost 9 months old. Stock up on bones (do some reasearch first - some are good and some are bad for them) and other things they are allowed to chew, which helps when you can't interact with them. My trainer just told me to make sure to spend one on one time during this stage of development, whether it be grooming, training, walking, dosn't matter as long as you are interactive with your dog, alot of the adolecence issues are put at bay if you take the time to teach them and guide them.

Good luck! I am still waiting for this stage to pass..hahah! :evil:

mummummum
June 4th, 2007, 04:32 PM
Any dog that is so destructive in my opinion needs a dog trainer. I would really put up the money for that. A pet should be a pleasure and not a nuisance. It also probably needs more stimulation, like walks and play time.

Let's remember that this is not a dog...it's a puppy. Mouthing/chewing/gnawing is a normal behaviour for a puppy. We know that chewing on Mummy's favourite shoes is a bad thing but to a puppy most of the world is an exciting plaything unless taught differently. Just like human babies, everything has to be tasted and gnawed on, including their own feet !

Puppy kindergarten sounds like a great idea though. Good luck !

PetFriendly
June 4th, 2007, 06:05 PM
Right now Ali the shredder gets five 15 to 20 minute walks a day I would like to take her for longer walks but am physically unable to do so.


No worries on the length of the walk, like I said, if they aren't using their brain, they probably aren't getting tired either.

If you can, just do some basic obedience training... once you are good in the house, take it outside, then on the road, literally... Drive to a park and try it there once the pup is good at your place. The drive alone will be excitement for the dog, and the change of scenery will stimulate the brain!