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Orijen dog food, any concerns with using for old dogs?

Furryland
May 29th, 2007, 10:08 AM
A store closer to me has brought in orijen so i got a sample pack to try w/the dogs along with their canidae, now 2 of the dogs are old.. one quite old[16yrs] they seem to like it and i have seen no problems of coarse we're just lightly adding it in with their normal kibble.

Their aren't any concerns or precautions i need to worry about with using a grain free food with senior dogs do i? :shrug:

Thanks!

geisha
May 29th, 2007, 11:56 AM
No there is nothing wrong with feeding a senior this diet as long as the pup is healthy. Senior dogs do not metabolize protein as well as normal dogs therefore they require higher amounts so the theory goes. After feeding my senior samoyed both BARF and a better quality kibble her energy level has improved immensely, her coat is beautiful, and she is leaner. I'd say go for it. If you would like to keep her on her original kibble and add the grain free as well that would be just fine. Good luck:thumbs up

gypsy_girl
May 29th, 2007, 01:41 PM
Although Senior dog do have an increased need for protein, how much of an increase is debatable. Raw diets (or Barf) are significantly lower in ingested protein that grain free kibble.
I would suggest that it would be fine, however, as with any senior dog, doing a blood panel to check your values is always indicated, however perhaps more so in the case as a precautionary measure. This would then indicate when you are heading to renal failure, as this happens generally with older dogs as they age.
You can then make an informed decision regarding if/when to reduce protein intake.

geisha
May 29th, 2007, 02:47 PM
Orijen has a senior diet. You may want to consider feeding this. If you have any questions email Orijen.

RaYne
May 30th, 2007, 10:03 AM
My father has a senior Toy Poodle (12 years old) that is on Orijen senior. It's done wonders for her. She's overweight, had horrible allergies and was so picky when it came to kibble. In the month she's been on it she has lost a pound or 2 (plenty more to go, lol), is no longer chewing patches of her fur out and is much more active. Plus she eats it with gusto.

I would definitely do the blood panel first though. Just as a precaution. My vet advised my father to do the same.

OntarioGreys
June 10th, 2007, 04:58 PM
Although Senior dog do have an increased need for protein, how much of an increase is debatable. Raw diets (or Barf) are significantly lower in ingested protein that grain free kibble.
I would suggest that it would be fine, however, as with any senior dog, doing a blood panel to check your values is always indicated, however perhaps more so in the case as a precautionary measure. This would then indicate when you are heading to renal failure, as this happens generally with older dogs as they age.
You can then make an informed decision regarding if/when to reduce protein intake.

A natural raw diet is rough 56% protein and this amount was tested on 7 and 8 year old dogs with just one kidney(surgically removed one for the study to produced renal function, sucks to have dne this wasy but proved the point ) and fed lower protein renal diet on another batch of dogs also with one kidney , after 4 years of feeding, several of the dog on the low protein diet died while those eating the high protein diet still alive with good functioning kidneys

What they proved was that high protein does not cause renal failure and it was also shown to improve kidney gominular(sp?) filtration function. Older dogs become more active because higher grain levels cause the body to inflammatory chemical which cause pain and swelling in joints remove the grains the inflammation is reduce so dogs are in less pain and therefore more active, so helps increase muscle tone and cardiac muscle tone there fore a healthier happier more mobile senior

If your senior has diabetes though should be vet monitored when switching to grain free as it affect insulin levels

gypsy_girl
June 11th, 2007, 08:46 PM
Although raw diets can vary in protein levels based on using the 100% calculation, in order to determine the actual ingested level, converting to dry matter must be done.
Most raw diets AFTER conversion come in significantly less than the no grain kibble (mainly because the moisture is 10% versus 60% or higher)