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How do you stop the jumping??

Ford Girl
May 1st, 2007, 03:16 PM
Hi, can those folks with dogs who like to jump up at people tell me what they have been told to do, whether it worked or not?

Dazy is selective with who she jumps on, she seems to do this to people with high pitched voices and some females, not all. And to me/husband while we stand in the kitchen, back to her, sorting mail on the counter or getting dinner ready. I have 10 pregnant girl friends who are around often, she's been good so far, just one incident that concerned me, my friend/baby wasn't hurt, didn't knock her over but Dazy kinda rebounded off the side of her belly!!! Other times she does half jumps, paws off the floor, wanting to jump up but knows better. She never jumps on kids as they approach, she never jumps on people at the off leash park, so it's unpradictable, if I can forsee it I yell "stay off" loud so she hears me, and that works. When I know one of my friends that triggers the jumping is coming over, I tell them not to ring the door bell, and I leash her to greet them, that works for the initial meet/greet, but once off leash she goes to jump on them.

I'm just looking for things to try when she does do it. Right now, we turn away from her and say "OFF", and most times push her away, follow it with a command like SIT, she listens, I'd like to just stop the initial jump. My vet said don't put your hands out to push her away altho that's the first reaction when you have a 60lb dog on you. I know she's a pup, but it's one of the most annoying things she does. Does maturity help with this too? Thanks!!!

breeze
May 1st, 2007, 03:37 PM
I am in the same problem as you are Ford Girl I have a 9 month old 65lbs bernesse and is still growing:eek: we have tried different things also but none of them seem to "stick" she does not jump on me but who ever enters the house look out here come Bree !! and she does go to jump on kids and we have alot of kids around or house..we have tired

turning our backs telling to sit
straight hand in front of her face
leashing her
treat training
holding her collar
the word off or no jump
ingoring her and walking away
pushing her off and saying no jump or no and sit
getting her attention before she jumps

if i think of any more we tried i will write them down lol

tenderfoot
May 1st, 2007, 06:15 PM
The problem is usually people teach failure not success. A dog jumps up - you eventually get them off and then the day goes on - but the dog never learned not to jump up. You have to give him multiple chances to make a better choice and then do it once more to enforce it and then reward the heck out of him for the good choice.
Someone usually comes into your house just once, and they might stay for a minute or 3 hours but they only entered once. If the dog jumps on them this greeting was failure and that what the dog learns is failure. You need to repeat the greeting and have the dog approach the person again for the dog to make another choice. The leash has to be loose so the dog can be allowed to make a good or bad choice. A tight leash just teaches the dog to pull or be controlled. Get through the failure to actually teach the right response.
This can be taught in five minutes if done correctly.
Jumping is a symptom of lack of respect. A dog who respects people’s personal boundaries will not jump on them unless they are invited to.
We teach "off" which means four feet on the ground. It is off of the couch, off of me, off of other people. You also want to teach ‘sit’ when a dog wants to be touched or greeted. So you are teaching a balance of “no, don’t jump – yes, please sit”.
You as the ‘decision maker’ dictate your dog’s manners. You know that he will want to jump, so set him up for learning. Put him on the leash and have a friend just stand there and do nothing – you approach the person with your dog from across the room. As you see your dog start to shift his weight to jump up, you give a slight leash correction to the side and say ‘Off’ in a firm (not loud) tone and take him away from the person.
Then you do it again. Each time giving a verbal correction & bring him off to the side with the leash to stop him from making contact with the person. In about three tries your dog should start to realize his mistakes and stay down – typically he will look at you (checking in for advice) and actually sit on his own volition. When he is good, then reward him with praise and soft touch. Repeat this game a couple of more times to ensure success and learning.
Ideally you should catch him as he is just ‘thinking’ about jumping up not when he is half way in the air - he can't stop himself then. Try to anticipate his actions and tell him ‘off’ before he has a chance to jump. This is teaching you to read your dog's thoughts and to react in time to help him make a better choice. Always use just enough energy to get results - not too much so you intimidate him but not so little that he blows you off. Each time and day might be a little more or less according to his mood, and as he gains respect for your word then it will be come just the hand signal or just the word and barely any energy at all.
The key is that you re-create the situation and correct the bad choices and give him another chance to make a better choice. As your dog gets good at this game, have the person pat their chest with energy and when you even see him thinking about jumping, you say 'off'. Invite him in again and again until he chooses to sit for his greeting.

tenderfoot
May 1st, 2007, 06:19 PM
*Please forgive some repetition from the earlier posting, but I want to make sure that if someone only reads one posting they get all of the information.

Jumping is a symptom of lack of respect. A dog who respects a persons boundaries will not jump on them unless they are invited to.
Backing away from your dog when he jumps on you simply empowers the dog – he moved you back. You are the one who should be empowered and move him back.
We teach the "off" which means four feet on the ground. It is off of the couch, off of me, off of other people.
We can walk into someone’s home for training and their dog will not jump on us to the amazement of their people. It can be as simple as the attitude you walk in with.
When he is jumping on you and you tell him off - Do not PUSH him down - that is a game to him and he doesn't take you seriously. Make your hand flat (like a board) and palms towards him and you can "pop" the air in front of him and walk towards him (making him back up). Do not HIT him that is not what this is about - setting a boundary with your hands and energy is very different than hitting him. Simply create a boundary that he is not welcome in and MEAN IT. If he jumps up and touches your 'popping' hand it will be uncomfortable for him and after a few tries it will no longer be fun and he should give up and hopefully sit asking "well what can I do?” When he sits, then reward him with praise and soft touch.
Ideally you have to stop him as he is thinking about jumping up not when he is half way in the air - he can't stop himself then. So show him your flat palms and say 'off' just as you see him thinking about jumping up. This is teaching you to read your dog's thoughts and to react in time to help him make a better choice. Always use just enough energy to get results - not so too much so you intimidate him but not so little that he blows you off. Each time and day might be a little more or less according to his mood, and as he gains respect for your word then it will be come just the hand signal or just the word and barely any energy at all.
The key is that you re-create the situation and correct the bad choices and give him another chance to make a better choice. Pat your chest with energy and when you even see him thinking about jumping, you say 'off' and show him your flat hands be ready to snap them in his direction if he keeps jumping. Back him up and have a firm tone in your voice (not loud). Invite him in again and again until he chooses to sit for his greeting.
The problem is usually people teach failure not success. A dog jumps up you eventually get them off and then the day goes on - but the dog never learned not to jump up. You have to give him multiple chances to make a better choice and then do it once more to enforce it and then reward the heck out of him for the good choice.
This can be taught in five minutes if done correctly.

breeze
May 2nd, 2007, 12:35 AM
Is it not true that if only you train for jumping and the others don't do the same then it will be harder for you to train for that peticular problem??
ie you and your husband, and your kids will not coperate....:shrug: :confused:

Puppyluv
May 2nd, 2007, 12:44 AM
I have the problem that Layla wikk jump up on someone, I'll say off, she gets offm but the person grabs her to keep her up and says "no no, I love dogs, it's fine!" I tell them that while they love dogs, I don't love my dog jumping on people, and they look at me like I'm crazy, You'd be suprised how many people do this. So now I'm at the point where Layla won't jump on me or anyone else that has respected my training, but then people confuse her when I tell her off and they grab her to keep her up. So she gets major mixed messages.:frustrated:

breeze
May 2nd, 2007, 12:53 AM
[QUOTE=tenderfoot;418431
The problem is usually people teach failure not success. This can be taught in five minutes if done correctly.[/QUOTE]

I respect your answer but this part really upsets me, the people I know do not try to teach failure the do want success, and they try really hard to train their dogs, IMO we do not have the amount of training that you do so it does take us longer.

tenderfoot
May 2nd, 2007, 09:56 AM
Breeze - Please don't waste one second being upset - perhaps I didn't state that very well (my bad). People don't mean to teach failure - but every dog you see who jumps on people, pulls on the leash, rushes the door - do so because at some level the people have permitted it - even unwittingly rewarded it. Every step a dog takes with tension on his collar teaches a dog to pull - not what the people intend but it is what the dog learns. Trust me, our dogs aren't perfect little robots (yuck, if they were!), and they mess up but when they mess up I have to look at what I did that allowed it.

It's not that people don't try, but that they often don't have the tools, understanding or patience. I am not trying to say that it is quick to teach things because we are so experienced, but that with good guidance ANYONE can do this. Dogs know how to be good - people just need to learn how to ask them to be good.

Does that help?

tenderfoot
May 2nd, 2007, 10:03 AM
Is it not true that if only you train for jumping and the others don't do the same then it will be harder for you to train for that peticular problem??
ie you and your husband, and your kids will not coperate....:shrug: :confused:

It doesn't make it any easier if your family encourages jumping. But think of this - if your child stomped on people's feet when they came to the door, you would take every opportunity to teach him better manners. You as the parent would monitor and actively teach until you saw your child making better choices on their own. At that point you could trust your child more when you weren't around. Same thing with your dog. If you are the only ne taking the jumping seriously and your family doesn't care then YOU have to take the role of teacher, parent leader and be there to correct the problem as much as possible. The dog will be good out of respect for you.

tenderfoot
May 2nd, 2007, 10:18 AM
I tell them that while they love dogs, I don't love my dog jumping on people, and they look at me like I'm crazy, You'd be suprised how many people do this.

Its all in your approach. Stop them before it gets to the point of jumping - both the dog and the people need to know you are in charge. Then if they start down the "oh, its' okay, I love dogs" road, then say "oh, I am so happy, because last time she tried to jump on someone who didn't love dogs and we almost got in trouble. Actually, since you are so great with dogs would you mind helping me for a minute? I have to teach her not to jump on people, would you just stand there for a second while we approach you a couple of times until we get success?, You are so great to do this for us, thanks."

People love to help when it comes to animals. Don't make them the enemy, just bring them into the training fold and they'll rarely object. That way it becomes a 'win-win' for everyone.

breeze
May 2nd, 2007, 10:44 AM
yes that does clear things up thank you for your understanding that it made me upset !!

Ford Girl
May 2nd, 2007, 03:39 PM
So to sum up what you are saying for us to try:

1. Leash the dog if possible.
2. have people enter and I say "off" or "stay off" as the person walks thru the door or approaches, think it before she does it
3. If the dog jumps, give slight correction via leash/collar, dont allow them to make contact. Tell them to sit. Once sitting, praise.
4. If they make contact put hand straight out, don't push them down, say "off", walk forward.
4. Have person go out, and in again until the dog made the appropriate decision.

Question - if there is no time for a leash or it's a stranger who can't come and go like the mail man - will the dog eventually make the right choice for all people or just the ones you train with?

Question - if in fact they do jump, and they are not on leash, you didn't have a chance to say "stay off", (real world situations) It's hard not to touch them. In theory this makes sense but dogs are dirty, have nails, weigh alot, etc...pushing them down or away, in to a sit postion doesn't work? Just clarifying cuz sometimes theory makes sense but doesn't work in real life situations.

My poping hands go out in front of me, they will make contact with my dog, it that ok? So it's No to pushing them away, but ok if my hands touch her extended infront of me, palms flat? She stands almost as tall as I do when on her back legs. (I'm only 5 feet tall!!) My hands will touch her regardless. Just walk forward saying off.

And if it's to the side or back of someone? You can't extend your hands. Walk away saying "off"?

I am looking forward to trying this, as I mentioned it's selective jumping, not always, or to eveyone. I too have lots of friends that don't mind her jumping up, some encourgae it, I always interviene and push her off and say off. Drives me nuts. Good thing she super cute. LOL!!!

tenderfoot
May 2nd, 2007, 06:47 PM
First I am going to state here and now that I hate my computer - this is the 3rd time I have tried to answer this and just as I get to the end it crashes. Here I go again....

1. Leash the dog if possible. 1. Leash creates success (dog can't out maneuver you) and empowers your word.

2. have people enter and I say "off" or "stay off" as the person walks thru the door or approaches, think it before she does it 2. You give her guidance when she is thinking about jumping - don't wait until she is actually in the air.

3. If the dog jumps, give slight correction via leash/collar, dont allow them to make contact. Tell them to sit. Once sitting, praise. 3. Try to walk away from the person and approach again, if the dog stays off then ask for a sit and reward that.

4. If they make contact put hand straight out, don't push them down, say "off", walk forward. 4. Yes.

5. Have person go out, and in again until the dog made the appropriate decision. 5. Always end on success.

Question - if there is no time for a leash or it's a stranger who can't come and go like the mail man - will the dog eventually make the right choice for all people or just the ones you train with? If you practice enough with enough people YES. But, if you are inconsistent and don't create success then the rewards of jumping up will out weigh your efforts.

Question - if in fact they do jump, and they are not on leash, you didn't have a chance to say "stay off", (real world situations) It's hard not to touch them. In theory this makes sense but dogs are dirty, have nails, weigh alot, etc...pushing them down or away, in to a sit postion doesn't work? Just clarifying cuz sometimes theory makes sense but doesn't work in real life situations. Touching them is the last resort and it just means that you were too late or they totally don't respect you.

My poping hands go out in front of me, they will make contact with my dog, it that ok? So it's No to pushing them away, but ok if my hands touch her extended infront of me, palms flat? She stands almost as tall as I do when on her back legs. (I'm only 5 feet tall!!) My hands will touch her regardless. Just walk forward saying off. If your dog jumps up and makes contact with your hands she did it to herself and she can choose not to do it. Don't wait until she is at full height or even one foot off the ground.

And if it's to the side or back of someone? You can't extend your hands. Walk away saying "off"? Turn around and same rules - walk into her. You wouldn't tolerate a child pushing into your back or side, why would you tolerate it from a big dog? Turn around and stand your ground.

If you were in a paddock with a horse who was heading straight for you and you are not permitted to leave the paddock (no cheating:>) what would you do? Just stand there and let him mow you over? You might raise your arms and wave them about, use your firm voice to get him to stop and even walk towards him with some energy to try to change his direction. You would do all of this early on in the game - you wouldn't wait for him to be on top of you and then try to push him off. People wait way too long to start guiding their dogs thoughts and actions. We aren't afraid of most dogs so we stand there and if they jump we push them down, but it doesn't teach the dog not to jump. To him its all part of a great greeting game. Catching the dog early is the most important aspect of getting him to make a better choice.

Ford Girl
May 4th, 2007, 03:01 PM
I have been working on this, and I have to say, if i can catch her before she thinks about it - no jumping, which is what I was doing all along and I know it works. If she does try and jump and I pop my hands out, they make contact every single time, I have not successfully popped my hands out with out contact, but walking forward gets her off me but I think it's cuz she loses her balance and can't walk on her hind legs. LOL!!!

I was over at a friends house and Dazy tried to jump, but I told her to stay off before she actually jumped it worked. (my friend has a very jumpy lab, so she's prepared) I also had friends over last night, 2 kids, 2 years old and 12, no jumping at all. She wanted to, but I said stay off a handful of times, as soon as her wiggle bum gets going I know she wants to jump, and she listens.

Thought I would reply and say we are trying these few suggestions. :)

breeze
May 4th, 2007, 10:14 PM
I too have been trying this and I must be doing it all wrong cause it is not working :sad: Guess I will have to try again and again and again

tenderfoot
May 4th, 2007, 10:55 PM
Breeze - what kind of dog do you have? how old?

What is it you are doing and what is the dog doing in response?

People sometimes think they are doing things correctly, but often it can be the most subtle of changes that need to happen in order to be efffective.

For instance, I can say "tell your dog 'off'", but your tone is light as you say "awwwwffff?" to the dog and he doesn't respond as he should. As simple tone change can make a huge difference.

mafiaprincess
May 5th, 2007, 12:25 AM
This has always been a chronic issue for us. Partially because my mother seems to like it.. Greets her with Cider's feet on her, no matter how many times I ask her to pet her with 4 on the floor.

Partially because I taught her wrong all along. I taught off, as in your paws are on me get them off.. Smart dog, she puts paws on and either removes them herself and does it again, or removes them when asked because she knows what 'off' means...

My grams memorial service was last week, along with the burial, and many people came over. Lot were really unimpressed with her paw manners.. Though she is the most well behaved dog I know.. Today my grandparents came over, so I put her on leash, pulled her back before she could jump as I saw it coming, and quickly made the decision to calm down, and lay down.. Rewarded her for it heavily..

When family comes home and stuff though, she's so so hyper she rebounds off them. Even on a leash unless kept a foot from them she like runs and swimmers turns off people.. Do you just keep tryign to greet on leash and keep pulling her back before she can paw them, and reward her when she makes the better choice not to paw, claw and rebound?

breeze
May 5th, 2007, 08:03 AM
Breeze - what kind of dog do you have? how old?

What is it you are doing and what is the dog doing in response?

People sometimes think they are doing things correctly, but often it can be the most subtle of changes that need to happen in order to be efffective.

For instance, I can say "tell your dog 'off'", but your tone is light as you say "awwwwffff?" to the dog and he doesn't respond as he should. As simple tone change can make a huge difference.

I have a 9 month old bernesse mountain dog, she very seldom jumps on me but does to my husband and kids (the kids are no help) if I am around when my husband come home it is no problem, it is when I am not around or we are outside and she sees kids or even adults (we are walking with the gentle leader) she walks beautiful could not ask for anything better loose leash but when I stop to talk to someone and she goes to jump, I put my flat hand in front cause i know she is going to jump and say off in a hard tone. then she continues to jump and pulls and pulls and pulls,the person sees this and goes up to her even though i tell them not to, I try and walk away, but she is so intent on seeing this person i can't,

Ford Girl
May 6th, 2007, 11:49 AM
Does some of this stick with maturity? Both breeze and myself have adolecent pups. I am hoping if we lay the ground rules now, it may just click one day.

Does domenence have anything to do with it? Dazy is very dominent, I've had to teach my girlfriends to boss her around even when they just want to give her love'ns, she won't settle with females around, she very much in their space. One of my friends backs away, with her hand down, touching her, saying...AWWWFFFF AWWFFFFF....no no no! In a almost scared voice, this is my friend she "picks" on the most. Dazy also crowds her on the couch, or crowds her space when she sits infront of her once we finnaly get her sitting, like she can't get close enough.

My vet just told me to step on her back foot, lightly, with no shoes on, not to hurt her, but make her uncomfortable. Or to grab and squeeze her paws. Anyone else hear anything along those lines?? I haven't read or heard that before, thought I would mention it.

tenderfoot
May 6th, 2007, 03:26 PM
Hi Ford Girl,

Set your relationship with rules and boundaries NOW, and absolutely it sticks for life. Its when you don't do anything and think the dog will just outgrow it that it becomes a lifelong problem.

Your dog is abusing your friend because she doesn't respect her space - the friend reacts in a fearful and excited manner and Dazy thinks that its all part of the fun. Your friend BACKS away and that empowers your dog. The hand down 'touching' the dog is just a reward for being pushy - she gets pet and it feels good!

I wouldn't say Dazy is dominant -she is just pushy and persistent & an energized kid! She is having a ball pushing your friend around so of course she does it more. In the end it is your job to teach and manage your dog. Have her on the leash and teach her 'off' of other people. You can't control what other people do but you can certainly have an influence over your own dog.

You should be able to walk through your dogs space and use your voice and hand signals just fine without having to hurt her toes or paws. When you try to step on toes or squeeze paws that means the dog is already on you. Remember you want to catch her when its a thought not when she's even 1/2 way in the air. Granted dogs are fast and it can feel tough to catch them early. Taking the time to teach your dog to have good manners with others so that you don't have to resort to corrections is ideal - but not always reality. So repeating until your skills are good and she is making better choices will pay off in the end without having to cause pain.



Hi Breeze,

The very first sentence of your posting was perfect - she is basically good with YOU but not others. That is because she respects you more.

The energy of strangers, kids or hubby feeds into her energy and she has tough time staying calm. Working on her patience with a 'stay' could help her a lot. She has also learned that pulling works to get her what she wants. I would set her up in a sit/stay and you be between her the people. YOU work on her holding the stay no matter what the distractions are. When she can stay and relax when people are 15 (or more) feet away from you then have the people come one step closer (have the person ignore her - don't even look at her)- help her regain her composure and do it again. I always like it when a dog is in a stay and they roll back on one hip (as if to say they have relaxed and aren't going to lunge forward anymore), then have the person move forward another step. You are desensitizing her to distances. Then have the people walk past her at increasing speeds, have the kids skipping past her - always building to the tougher distractions - with success at the previous level first. Right now she is being tested at levels she is not ready for, as if she were in middle school and you are sending her to college. Teach her impulse control and patience - all good things for her to learn.

Practice with people that will respect YOUR word and help you teach her good manners. I would avoid having her around the more challenging people (who don't listen to your requests) until she is showing more self control. This is about setting her up for success not failure - those people are too tempting for her because they are helping to make things worse not better.

breeze
May 7th, 2007, 02:34 PM
so I printed everything you said, left it on the table so my hubby and boys could read it. Hubby read it and started to do what you said, things are going better for him... (maybe he did not understand what I told him) now the boys they are not really cooperating..

the neighbours are no better,when they won't listen so I tell them "sorry can't stop now, no time, they think I am being anti social and rude they don't like my doggie jumping I try and explain but they don't want to hear it, but they don't understand why I can't stop and talk when I have Bree,(go figure) . there are a couple that will help me but the others no, the kids that live around my house are also no help, so I just walk away, or if she gets to rambunkish I make her sit and stay until she calms down, I also tell the kids "It is not a good time to see her", sometimes that works other times no.

tenderfoot
May 7th, 2007, 07:37 PM
Hi Breeze,

Sounds like you are headed down a much better path. :thumbs up

If your own children aren't paying attention to your words then that would also be a great opportunity to start teaching them some rules and boundaries and begin to respect mom's words. It just might pay off in all kinds of ways!:rolleyes:

breeze
May 7th, 2007, 07:50 PM
my kids did when they were small now they are 18 and 21 they listen to me and hubby just can't be bothered by the doggie, their eyes it's your dog not mine

tenderfoot
May 7th, 2007, 09:02 PM
Yes, I understand - it can be tougher to impress the young adults in the house when their lives are so full already - the dog is the least of their worries.

breeze
May 7th, 2007, 09:13 PM
I think we will try a different approach with the other people in the house, ie kids