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Ideal kitty poop?

Edgewaters
April 1st, 2007, 04:05 PM
:sorry:


Please describe ideal kitty poo. Is it light coloured or dark? Firm is good, right? But what is ideal moisture - not spongy but not rock dry? Big nuggets or little nuggets? Is it better if the "nuggets" are all attached in a single long stool, if they are partially separate with a few pairs stuck together, or all completely separated? Is it better if they float in water, or sink?

Pictures, if you dare ... :eek:

EDIT oh yeah, I don't actually mean kittens ... adult cats.

Stacer
April 1st, 2007, 04:52 PM
My kitty's poops are firm, smallish and don't really produce much of a smell. I'm not really sure of the colour cause they get covered in litter, but when one of them doesn't fully cover a turd they're usually a medium-dark brown colour. I can definitely tell the difference in poops from the last food we fed them and the food we feed them now, much nicer poops, size and smell.

Maxine
April 1st, 2007, 05:54 PM
:laughing: i got a good laugh at imagining you testing the poop to float or sink... !!! Stacer answered pretty good!
:sorry: :offtopic: Here is a question for you stacer, what do you feed your cats?

Edgewaters
April 1st, 2007, 06:12 PM
:laughing: i got a good laugh at imagining you testing the poop to float or sink... !!!

Oh ... hehe ... I should explain ... we use a flushable, water soluble, biodegradable litter ... so you can just scoop out the poop and clumps and toss them in the toilet.

It's good stuff! If the clay litters are bothering you (silica dust etc) you might want to try it:

http://www.elegantcatlitter.com/

(most of their claims are true - except tracking, they still track the pellets out of the box)

Stacer
April 1st, 2007, 06:28 PM
:laughing: i got a good laugh at imagining you testing the poop to float or sink... !!! Stacer answered pretty good!
:sorry: :offtopic: Here is a question for you stacer, what do you feed your cats?

Right now we're feeding them GO! Natural (before that they were on California Natural), but I think we're going to switch because I just noticed that there's phosphoric acid in the ingredients. The search begins for a new food this week.

We used to use Swheat Scoop flushable and it was a toss up if they were floaters or sinkers. I don't think that floatability would correlate to a healthier poop.

KimandAutumn
April 1st, 2007, 06:32 PM
no offense.. but why are we discussing cat poop in the dog/cat food forum?

LavenderRott
April 1st, 2007, 06:46 PM
no offense.. but why are we discussing cat poop in the dog/cat food forum?

Because every dog thinks that cat poop is just about the best treat around?

KimandAutumn
April 1st, 2007, 06:57 PM
Because every dog thinks that cat poop is just about the best treat around?

haha, man dogs and their tastes are disgusting. :evil:

wmarcello
April 1st, 2007, 08:51 PM
Is seems like our kitties' poops are similar to what Stacer described.

- medium to dark
- firm
- not sure about moisture as I've never gotten out the gloves, but it seems quite dry
- float

We used to feed Whiskas, then moved on to Nutrience, and then have since moved onto Felidae for the last week or so. There doesn't seem to be much difference since moving from Nutrience to Felidae, but when both are compared to Whiskas, they poop a lot less and it doesn't smell nearly as bad.

We also use a biodegradable, flushable litter available at the Atlantic Superstore.

President's Choice Green (http://www.presidentschoice.ca/Pets/ProductDetails.aspx/id/16903/name/PCGREENTwiceasAbsorbentClumpingCatLitter/catid/41)

EDIT: For reference, our kitties are just shy of a year old.

Maxine
April 1st, 2007, 09:45 PM
Thanks about the infos, and Edgewaters, I hope now have a better idea of what is called "ideal cat poop" :cat:

Maxine

Edgewaters
April 1st, 2007, 09:54 PM
no offense.. but why are we discussing cat poop in the dog/cat food forum?

Ah ... well ... I just figured it's all about diet. What goes in must come out etc. I figure poop is one of the first ways you can tell how they're reacting to new food.