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for new dog owners

~michelle~
March 14th, 2007, 05:25 PM
so i thought this would be helpful for new dog owners that come to the forum. i dont know if we have one already, but if as many people as possible could write down one tip/thing they wich they knew when they were a new dog ownership to make it easier for them :)

Prin
March 14th, 2007, 05:26 PM
Never throw out ALL the newspaper on recycling day. ;)

(great idea, btw :highfive: )

jesse's mommy
March 14th, 2007, 05:33 PM
We got down on the floor and crawled around so we could be at her eye level and see if there was anything she could get in. You'd be surprised how different things look from that perspective.

Also, deny access to all wires. :frustrated:

~michelle~
March 14th, 2007, 05:50 PM
oh i guess i should put one.... no matter how cute those eyes are, remain consistant, if you say something follow through, it will make training easier and faster.

H.P.
March 14th, 2007, 06:37 PM
Puppies are like babies--prepare to loose sleep and get the best kisses ever!

LynLyn
March 14th, 2007, 11:16 PM
Dogs like to sleep with the "pack" not on their own, so a great place for them to sleep is in the bed with you!!:lovestruck:

angeldogs
March 15th, 2007, 03:23 AM
If your animal is seriously sick.get to vet.not to pet forum

Hunter's_owner
March 15th, 2007, 06:32 AM
Unplug any appliances that have a plug in at puppy's eye level:o

~michelle~
March 15th, 2007, 07:15 AM
if you think your dog might be in pain it probably is, yelping and crying is not done frequently. thinks such as limping means they are in pain. theres no harm in a vet visit (except to your wallet)

also start a savings fund for emergencies, they always happen when you dont have the $$ for it... its murpheys law

in spring time buy skunk spray treatments, do this before your animals gets sprayed because when and if it happens the store will be closed.


oh dogs have a rebellious teenager faze much like humans, it doesnt last as long but they're just as difficult as real human teenagers, keep some liquor around for yourself during this time, you'll need a drink every now and then to get through it :p


oh no matter how many toys you have for them dogs will chew on your favorite shoes, never the old around the house lounging shoes, but your favorite most expensive shoes that fit you just right.

hazelrunpack
March 15th, 2007, 01:24 PM
If your new dog is of teething age, invest in a pair of cheap bicycle gloves--the kind that covers the back and palm of the hand but has no fingers. They do a great job of saving wear and tear on your hands till puppy gets the idea that mom and dad are not chew toys :thumbs up

Also, take old washcloths, get them wet, wring them out, and throw them in the freezer. Puppy will love chewing on them when they're frozen--must feel good on those sore gums. Very often we'll find baby teeth in the washcloths, too...so if you're into saving teeth as momentos, here's a good source :D

Make sure you supervise puppy with the washcloths, though--he/she could chew pieces off and swallow them if left unchecked.

lt_danish
March 15th, 2007, 05:19 PM
Take you dog to the vet regularly and keep all their health records up to date. Even if you are one of those people who only goes to your human doctor when sick it never hurts to build a bond between your dog, yourself and your vet when you pet is happy and healthy. Then one day if your dog is sick it won't feel so scared and unsure when you really NEED to go in. If you don't like your vet, get a new one!

rainbow
March 15th, 2007, 05:50 PM
~ Take your puppy to obedience school......it's great training for both of you.

~ Get your puppy spayed or neutered.

Mocha's mum
March 15th, 2007, 06:38 PM
Remember to be patient with your new fur kid. Training doesn't happen overnight.

Be consistent.

Don't get a new pup just because it's cute or it's Christmas or "oh mommy/daddy I want it". Do some research about what breeds would be the best for you and your family. If you want a lap dog, that doesn't equal Great Dane, just because he was so cute as a pup.....

Adopt a rescue.

The last two might be a little too late, however, I feel are important to say.


Enjoy puppyhood. And take lots of pictures....and post them here!! :D

K, I'm done!

clm
March 15th, 2007, 11:24 PM
Beware of occassions that have fireworks. Keep you dog inside on those occasions, they terrify most dogs.


Cindy

gomez
March 16th, 2007, 01:15 AM
Crate train your puppy and keep it going through adulthood -

If you ever have to travel and puppy needs to go in the airplane hold, he will be ready and comfortable in his crate...



ps - don't think you will never travel with puppy in the hold b/c you never know!!

TeriM
March 16th, 2007, 01:22 AM
A tired dog is a well-behaved dog! Remember to exercise and play with your dog, you will both be happier :) .

Catzig
March 16th, 2007, 07:41 AM
Don't worry or second-guess yourself so much ... trust your instinct.

Is that more than one? Our first foster arrived about 36 hours ago and it's harder than an new puppy! ... I have to remind myself of all those things, most of all the second guessing.

Thanks for starting this thread. What helpful comments!

shayla
March 16th, 2007, 02:01 PM
If you want to clip your puppy's nails yourself, or groom him, you should start as early as possible to touch their feet, massage the toes, otherwise you'll end up with a dog who freaks each time you try to clip his nails! (and end up paying $$$ just to get the nails done).

papillonmama
March 16th, 2007, 02:08 PM
If training isn't going so well, take a break, it's hard to train a puppy when you are frustrated, and it's confusing for the pup. ;)

Edited to add: Of course you should go back to the training after you're not frustrated, lol, I did not mean not to train your dog! Sorry I wasn't clear.

~michelle~
March 16th, 2007, 02:12 PM
for those who adopt older pets or are thinking of it, they have just as much potential to grow and learn as a young pup, and its sooo rewarding.

Ive done it three times and i love it, puppies are cute but the gratitude you get from rescuing an older dog compares to nothing else.

ps glad you guys like the thread, hopefully it will help people along the way...

bekka_1
March 16th, 2007, 06:42 PM
puppies pee alot. They have to go after they do everything, eat, sleep,play

goldengal
March 16th, 2007, 07:01 PM
Put the crate in your bedroom from the very beginning, and the puppy will not cry nearly as much. Learned that the hard way.

Frenchy
March 16th, 2007, 07:11 PM
please adopt older rescue dogs

please adopt older rescue dogs

and.....please adopt older rescue dogs :thumbs up just cuz, they're the best !

TMac
March 16th, 2007, 09:21 PM
No matter how old your new dog is, take him/her to obedience class - even if they already know all the commands. It helps build your dog's trust in you and vice versa.

and...

adopt an older dog! They will spend the rest of their lives showing you how grateful they are! :lovestruck:

TMac
March 16th, 2007, 09:24 PM
A tired dog is a well-behaved dog!

I second this tip! :thumbs up

rainbow
March 16th, 2007, 10:43 PM
I third it. :)

technodoll
March 16th, 2007, 10:55 PM
Join pets.ca!!! wish i knew about you guys when we got dakotah! but better late than never ;)

rainbow
March 17th, 2007, 12:05 AM
Excellent tip TD....I definitely second that one. :highfive:

we3beagles
March 17th, 2007, 12:22 AM
So many things....

I wish I would have known the difference between a reputable breeder and a BYB.
Never get a pet store puppy.
Give a rescue dog a chance.
Properly socialize (incredibly important). This means introducing them to all sorts of people, sounds, object so they grow up to be full of confidence in their surroundings and not fearful.
Watch puppies constantly. They can be destructive, but are eager to please and want to chew on appropriate things and not your drywall.
Crate train, crate train, crate train. The difference is amazing. Bugsey we didn't and Capone we did. Bugsey never caught on to housebreaking until he was about 5, Capone caught on right away.
Cuddle them every chance you get. There are no guarantees and they love you so much.
Good quality kibble (see the food forum).
If you are unsure whether you need to see the vet or not YOU DO!

rainbow
March 17th, 2007, 12:49 AM
If you are unsure whether you need to see the vet or not YOU DO!

Another excellent tip. :highfive:

athenamor
March 17th, 2007, 08:37 AM
One I've gotten from this site, but will help a new owner too:

When you first get your puppy or older dog (find out what brand they are used to), and you want to change his/her food to a higher quality brand, start slowly by mixing the good food w/ the old. Even if it's better for them the change could upset thier tummy if done over night.

Don't forget to get shots and other vet care done especially if you've gotten this pup from someone who is trying to get rid of an "accidental" litter.

Same goes w/ kitties too :)

Frenchy
March 17th, 2007, 09:27 AM
Another thing (I don't know if someone mentioned it) but research the breed before you get your dog. Sometimes people will get a dog because they like how it looks . I always liked Great Danes, tought I might own one, later , one day. I'm fostering one right now and I can tell you it's not a breed for me nor for my lifestyle. She's a great dog, but I live in the boonies (like Prin calls it :p ) and I can honestly say, it's not a life for these type of dogs,too much snow/wind. Those dogs like the indoors better, I like being outside with my goldens but Nelly only stays to do her business and goes right back inside. She doesn't like to go walk in the fields (too much snow for her) while my goldens love it. So research research research the breed.

~michelle~
March 17th, 2007, 01:35 PM
i totally second that frenchy,
so many popular breeds are overflowing in shelter because people bought them for looks/stereotypes. (labs and huskys come to mind esp) RESEARCH, a dog may be cute but certain breeds are not foreveryone.

mummummum
March 17th, 2007, 01:44 PM
When you bring your older dog to your forever-home, let them find their way for awhile. It may be a month, it may be year or more before your rescued dog knows it's "home" and can *start* to be themselves. Training is good, setting limits is good ~ but, what is the point of being rigid if you are just reinforcing everything your dog thinks they know about humans?

Relax your expectations ~ it isn't a competition. When you find something that is an obvious source of fear or causes aggression, don't tackle it. Take it down by small degrees. Sometimes a goofily, happy dog who knows they are *home* is more important than a dog who can do *X* on demand.

Above all else, let them show you who they are ~ older dogs not only amaze, they will remind you of what is best in the world ~ joy in simply being alive.

lt_danish
March 17th, 2007, 08:25 PM
I thought of another one my trainer taught me. If you live in an urban area or area with lots of kids get your dog used to the sound of a skateboard. Borrow one if you can and get your dog used to the sound of it rolling on pavement and sometimes crashing. Apparently lots of dogs are scared of this sound and can jump, pull, run away if they hear/see one go by.