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Well, I Just Threw Out A Dozen Eggs

Lukka'sma
February 21st, 2007, 01:25 PM
Today I was making deviled eggs for a get together and I am getting so pissed off at how badly they peel.
I have tried everything.
Peeling under water
Cracking them in the pot by giving them a big swirl and then peeling under water.
Using eggs that are not farm fresh, because they don't peel at all.
Immediately dunking them in cold water once cooked.
I give up, I cannot serve anything that looks like this!!!:mad: http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p275/clwhal/2006_1201Lukka0002.jpg
Now, I have been making deviled eggs my entire life and it's only the last couple of years that they just don't peel worth a damn. What is wrong with these chickens today anyway! :confused: Can't they lay an egg with a decent shell.
If you are having no problems peeling boiled eggs I need to know the secret.

breeze
February 21st, 2007, 01:47 PM
we have the same problem, people told me to cook the eggs in advance like a day before put them in the fridge and peel the next day.. does it work not sure got so fustrated :mad: i have not tried it yet.. and no one can tell me the secret either :frustrated: even the fresh farm eggs do not peel right I know what you are going through.

technodoll
February 21st, 2007, 01:50 PM
:eek: i hope you made chopped egg sandwiches with those eggs, or gave them to lukka :dog:

some peeling tips (cuz the DO all drive us maaaaad!) :D

http://www.wikihow.com/Peel-an-Egg-Quickly

also:

Extremely fresh eggs will not peel easily. In fact, an egg that is just a day or two old is almost impossible to peel. As eggs age, the shells will peel more easily. It is advisable that eggs used for hard cooking (including Easter Eggs) be at least 2 weeks old before cooking for easiest peeling. Hard cooked eggs that are cooked slowly over low heat (and not ‘boiled’) will be more difficult to peel.

Rick C
February 21st, 2007, 01:51 PM
Use a tablespoon.

Tap the egg with the spoon around its circumfrence, creating a narrow circle of cracks around the middle (east/west), then use the spoon underneath the crack to force the shell off by going north on the egg and then south. . . . it'll be a few pieces but generally a fairly smooth process.

Hope I explained that right.

That's how I peel and egg.

Rick C
www.goldentales.ca

Lukka'sma
February 21st, 2007, 02:05 PM
OK, I read that TD and Rick. Will give all suggestions a try.
Do you know what it feels like to be out smarted by an egg!:eek: :mad:
Makes one feel like they have the brains of a soap dish.:yell:

Stacer
February 21st, 2007, 04:01 PM
I never really have mass problem like that when I make my devilled eggs, there's usually only one or two bad eggs in the bunch that won't peel properly. I don't think I have a secret.

What's your recipe? I am the queen of devilled eggs in my family and my husband's family. I get requests for my eggs *brag*.

CyberKitten
February 21st, 2007, 04:11 PM
This is my method which my dad taught me many years ago - it always works. Up till then (I was still in Junior high, lol), I always ended up with eggs that were hard to crack open or had to be done VERY carefully!!!!

First, boil enuf water to cover the egg. I know that sounds basic but I have discovered an amazing no. of ppl do not do that for whatever reason. Immediately after removing the egg or eggs from the fridge, prick the rounded END of the egg with a pin. This will prevent the egg from cracking when it ior they are placed in the water.

Once the water is boiling furiously - ie you can see the little bubbles - place the egg(s) in the water. Try not to drop it (them) in since that can also cause the egg to crack, with egg white spreading around the pot. I use a spoon to place the egg(s).

You should time the egg once the boiling begins anew after the egg is placed in the water.

This simple procedure works for me every time!

Prin
February 21st, 2007, 04:22 PM
I agree with CK.. I poke a hole at the end that is the widest. Never have trouble.:o

jesse's mommy
February 21st, 2007, 05:34 PM
I just buy the ones made in the deli at the grocery store. ;)

meb999
February 21st, 2007, 06:45 PM
Poke a hole, eh? Good to know....good to know.....

Mocha's mum
February 21st, 2007, 08:57 PM
Who knew there was such a science behind devilled eggs......hmmmmm.....

I love those crazy little things but I have no idea how to make them. I usually wait until Christmas or special occasions and eat someone else's!! :laughing:

glasslass
February 22nd, 2007, 01:42 AM
As mentioned, older eggs. The air space enlarges with age and makes the membrane separate easily from the shell

Cover eggs with cold water. Bring to a full boil. Cover and turn off the heat. Let sit, covered, for 15 mins.

Drain and let cold water run over eggs in saucepan. As they cool, tap each egg lightly against the inside of the pot until they crack all over, then end by rolling them against the pot. Leave in the cold water until you've cracked all of them. Sometimes, the shell just slips off in one big peel! I just let the peeled eggs and shells stay in the cold water until I've peeled all of them. Then take each one out, rinse any bits of shell off and dry with a paper towel.

I like to add cream cheese to the yolk mixture. It helps give it "body" and insures I can pile the filling high. Sweet pickle relish adds a nice flavor to the mixture.

coppperbelle
February 22nd, 2007, 05:37 AM
I was going to say fresh eggs work better but that has been disputed. One thing I did read is to allow the eggs to cool sufficiently before attempting to peel them. Once they have boiled, drain the hot water and fill the pot with cold water. Leave the eggs in a few minutes and then peel.

meb999
February 22nd, 2007, 06:09 AM
since mine ALWAYS come out crappy (I've rarely been successfull at peeling...), I usually wind up making a nice egg salad with them :shrug:

joeysmama
February 22nd, 2007, 09:10 AM
I usually drain the hot water, fill the pot with cold nad after about 2 minutes remove the eggs to a paper towel on the counter. I peel them as soon as they're cool enough to handle. I smash (gently smash?) both ends and then give the egg a gentle roll back and forth under the palm of my hand. Then I start peeling at the wide end.

I usually have no problems but when I do have a problem it almost always winds up being with every egg in the batch. Sometimes it's just the eggs and there isn't much you can do about it. But if you have your heart set on deviled eggs you can slice the raggedy looking eggs anyway.

Use an egg slicer to slice them into rounds. Then put the whites on a round cracker and prepare the yolks the way you normally do.

Top the cracker and the whites with the yolks. This mkaes a nice little hors doeuvres and if you were planning on making the deviled eggs for guests you'll get more mileage out of them this way.

4thedogs
February 22nd, 2007, 09:24 AM
Drain and let cold water run over eggs in saucepan. As they cool, tap each egg lightly against the inside of the pot until they crack all over, then end by rolling them against the pot. Leave in the cold water until you've cracked all of them. Sometimes, the shell just slips off in one big peel! I just let the peeled eggs and shells stay in the cold water until I've peeled all of them. Then take each one out, rinse any bits of shell off and dry with a paper towel.


This is what I do and have never had a problem. I run cold water over them and then let them sit in cold water. I tap both ends and then roll them to crack the whole shell and then just peel it off, rinse and dry.

technodoll
February 22nd, 2007, 09:29 AM
all this talk has made me WANT SOME!! LOL :cloud9:

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Appetizers/AppetizerIndexes/DeviledEggs.jpg

4thedogs
February 22nd, 2007, 09:42 AM
I hate eggs but make them for the family.

Mahealani770
February 22nd, 2007, 02:00 PM
I wait until the eggs are completely cooled down, tap them on the counter until the shell has broken (one good time), and then roll them, pressing firmly, causing little cracks everywhere. This works for me every time. :D

Rick C
February 22nd, 2007, 02:19 PM
I wait until the eggs are completely cooled down, tap them on the counter until the shell has broken (one good time), and then roll them, pressing firmly, causing little cracks everywhere. This works for me every time. :D

That's what my wife does as well . . . . . she uses some very colourful language sometimes when it doesn't work.

Rick C
www.goldentales.ca

Lukka'sma
March 31st, 2007, 09:30 AM
prick the rounded END of the egg with a pin.

Update
I have been picking the end with a pin and have had no problem peeling boiled eggs with this method. Wonderful idea and I wish I had learned that secret long ago.

gomez
March 31st, 2007, 09:39 AM
I just noticed this thread - so ...

Another method is to steam your eggs - at work we did 50-60 in large pans in the steamer oven, but you can do the same at home on a small scale - use a double boiler or a steamer and let them go for 10-12 minutes - they will peel very easily afterwards

Also, the steaming is much more fool-proof than the various methods of boiling, I think...

joeysmama
March 31st, 2007, 10:42 AM
Does anyone have any advice on blowing out a raw egg? I used to just prick both ends and blow the out but boy !!! that can make you dizzy after awhile. I read soemwhere about using a tool for this. Would anyone know if it works better if the eggs are room temp?

Tricks, advice whatever ? I need to do a couple dozen so we can decoupage them for Easter.

trippincherri
April 4th, 2007, 12:48 AM
I guess by pricking the end of the egg before boiling wouldn't that sort of be like steaming them? The heat would be able to get inside the egg better and spread more evenly causing the shell to expand away from the egg, therefore making it easier peel.
I love trying to make things scientific lol :D
Does this theory make sense?

Oh and Joeysmama my ex sister-in-law used to use a syringe to suck out eggs for decorating.
She always had great luck with that.