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Nightmares at nights...

Boncuk
February 14th, 2007, 02:16 PM
Hi all,

I have adopted a cutie, two-month old female dog from a shelter. She is a mixed breed, heavy on the Lab side.

She was sick a week ago, so she was just sitting there quietly waiting us to pet her. Thankfully, she got rid of the early stages of that infamous kennel cough. But, now she is not much of a quiet pup anymore !!!

I have been reading articles how to train my puppy and see some progress in her behavior. However, when the night time arrives, our silent daytime puppy turns into something completely different.

I don't know how to cope with her. :confused:

She constantly whines, wants to come in to our bedroom and jump on our bed. Once, we could not resist, and let her in and put her on the bed, since we live in an apartment flat, naturally we have to keep her quiet as much as possible, especially in the nights.

Last night was a nightmare. She was in bed with us but that did not stop her from nipping and biting. I was really patient up till that moment then, contrary to what I taught myself, I lost it, and started yelling at her, followed unfortunately by several spanks, :sorry: which scared the hell out of her. I am not proud of what I did, but I was very tired and did not know other way out.

I can control her during the daytime but I am pretty much clueless when the time for bed comes.

:candle: Any idea how I should treat her?

pitgrrl
February 14th, 2007, 02:23 PM
How much excersise is she getting and at what times of the day?

Winston
February 14th, 2007, 02:31 PM
Hi all,

I have adopted a cutie, two-month old female dog from a shelter. She is a mixed breed, heavy on the Lab side.

She was sick a week ago, so she was just sitting there quietly waiting us to pet her. Thankfully, she got rid of the early stages of that infamous kennel cough. But, now she is not much of a quiet pup anymore !!!

I have been reading articles how to train my puppy and see some progress in her behavior. However, when the night time arrives, our silent daytime puppy turns into something completely different.

I don't know how to cope with her. :confused:

She constantly whines, wants to come in to our bedroom and jump on our bed. Once, we could not resist, and let her in and put her on the bed, since we live in an apartment flat, naturally we have to keep her quiet as much as possible, especially in the nights.

Last night was a nightmare. She was in bed with us but that did not stop her from nipping and biting. I was really patient up till that moment then, contrary to what I taught myself, I lost it, and started yelling at her, followed unfortunately by several spanks, :sorry: which scared the hell out of her. I am not proud of what I did, but I was very tired and did not know other way out.

I can control her during the daytime but I am pretty much clueless when the time for bed comes.

:candle: Any idea how I should treat her?



Hello...do you crate your puppy.....if so you could try a couple of things...

bring the crate closer to you..for example beside the bed
you could try putting a doggy bed beside your bed.trouble is trying to keep her in that spot..
I have also heard putting a clock in the crate with them reminds them of being with the mom...

I have to say that I think we all have lost it one point or another! However, I have learned through training that it is not very effective...Dogs seem to learn way quicker if you are calm and in control..

What do you do when she nips or bites you normally?

If you dont crate your dog I would reccomend you do so! My boy is 7 years old now and we still use his crate...I dont close the door or anything but he still goes in there to lay down..I think it gives him his own space as well... I was fearful of crate training until I did a bit of research on it...It is not a bad thing really!

Good Luck

Cindy

Boncuk
February 14th, 2007, 03:22 PM
Well, she plays with me as an exercise whenever she is awake.

No, I don't have a crate for her. but indications show that I need one.

I cry "ouch" and leave her alone when she nips and bites. Lately I am rewarding her when she lets me pet her.

She had a spot in our bedroom on which she slept peacefully on the first night. The following night though that was not enough, she wanted to sleep with us no matter what.

I hope I have a rather quieter night tonight.:fingerscr

Thanks for the replies. :thumbs up

tenderfoot
February 14th, 2007, 08:13 PM
Sleeping in bed with you isn't a bad choice so long as you teach her that bedtime means sleep - not playtime.

The next best choice would be in a crate in the bedroom or in a dog bed in the bedroom - but no matter what it takes an effort from you to teach her that night time is sleep time - no options.

Please try to give her things she can do like "lay down" and "stay", so you don't have to resort to losing your temper. If you can teach her what you want then you will both have an easier time of it instead of waiting until she is doing lots of what you don't want.

Yes, with a new pup there are times you have to say 'enough', but try to actively teach her the good stuff so you don't have to rely on corrections as much.

Boncuk
February 15th, 2007, 04:35 AM
Last night was quiet a success.

Instead of punishment, we rewarded her whenever she did something good. I know it is not a brain surgery to figure it out but controlling our temper and finding out the right approach takes time. :angel:

We laid her favorite t-shirt down on the floor. she found it cozy enough to sleep on. She did not cry as much as she did before. When she needed us, we made her sit first and then gave her a treat and pet her a little as a result she calmed down and went back to sleep.

I guess the documents and articles on alpha dogs really helped us, so far at least.

However, now we are not sure how close we can get to her. Should we keep our distance a little and show her that we are the leaders in this family and then get closer later? Or are we gonna keep that distance forever? What's the recipe for that?

Thanks again

Spirit
February 15th, 2007, 07:24 AM
This is good that she lay back to sleep, but be careful not to reward the whining or cry for attention. If laying down and being quiet is what you want, then that's when you want to give her the treat or attention (once she's down and quiet). Otherwise she learns that a cry in the middle of the night gets rewarded, and it could make the problem worse. She wakes up, cries, and gets a treat.

The next time she does this, try ignoring her and see what she does. If she gives up and lays down, give her a quick pet to let her know she did something good (I'd avoid the treat, myself). If she stays down, another pet could be rewarded. If she doesn't lay back down, or if she barks, then you can sternly (but gently) tell her that this behavior is not wanted by you, by teling her to lay down and go back to sleep. Again, the reward comes after she's laying back down (and not before).

Reward the beahvior you want.

She's still adjusting though, so it's not going to happen overnight (corrections will be made), but this is an excellent start!

PetFriendly
February 15th, 2007, 08:25 PM
Last night was quiet a success.

Instead of punishment, we rewarded her whenever she did something good. I know it is not a brain surgery to figure it out but controlling our temper and finding out the right approach takes time. :angel:

...

However, now we are not sure how close we can get to her. Should we keep our distance a little and show her that we are the leaders in this family and then get closer later? Or are we gonna keep that distance forever? What's the recipe for that?

Thanks again

So long as you call all the shots, and she's only cuddled when you want to do it, and not when she asks, you should be ok. Even alpha dogs show 'affection'. As her behaviour improves, increase the amount of affection. She'll figure it out! :thumbs up

badger
February 15th, 2007, 09:19 PM
Just a thought: just playing with her isn't really enough exercise. She needs to be taken for a walk once or twice a day - even a half-hour would be beneficial, burn off some of her puppy energy.

I don't think it is too early to raise this, so I will: have you made an appointment to have her spayed? She's a bit young yet, but it would be good to have a plan.

Can we have a picture?

Boncuk
February 16th, 2007, 07:42 AM
You are right by saying that just playing with her is not enough. However, she just got rid of kennel cough so our vet advised us to keep her inside for a while in order to protect her from the cold. She was really weak a week ago but lately she is turning into a little monster. :thumbs up

We are careful at when we praise her. I guess she is getting the message. - she is a fast learner.

She will be spayed when she hits her 8th month, that's also our vet's advise.

By the way, we think that she can use a bath since she came from a shelter and she has not had a bath. However, we are not sure whether or not we should go ahead and give her a bath. She is ok now, healthwise. what do you think?

tenderfoot
February 16th, 2007, 01:35 PM
A bath would be great, but set her up for success.

Put about 6 inches of warm water in a tub and set her in the tub. Use a large plastic cup to gently pour water over her. Start with the legs and move up her body. Be sure to get her face and behind her ears, but avoid getting water in her ears.

I wouldn't use the shower or running water until she looks calm. The noise from running water can scare a pup and that would not be good. You want to have fun with her so that she has a positive memory of the bath. Do not take her out if she is still shakey or 'whale' eyed. Stick with it until you see her relax. If you take her out when she is nervous then that is what she will remember about baths - being nervous. But if you wait for her to relax before you take her out then she will have a nicer memory of the experience. If she is relaxed enough you could offer her a treat in the tub to help create a nice memory.

Don't use too much soap and be sure you rinse throughly. Too much soap can dry the skin out and cause itching. I don't know what resources you have but if you can't find special doggie shampoos then you can use people shampoo (diluted) or ivory soap just be sure to rinse, rinse, rinse. Do not use dishwashing soap as it will strip all the oils from the coat. You can also use conditioners to soften the coat and make grooming easier.

Towel her off really well when you are done, but remember she is going to get the 'zoomies' when its over. She will race around the apartment and shake off :goodvibes: everywhere - so be prepared to get a good laugh.:p

Boncuk
February 18th, 2007, 08:43 AM
Thanks tenderfoot for the advices. :thumbs up

Right now we have another problem. :mad:

Sometimes we have no clue how to approach her when she does not pay attention to what we say or do. We say NOs or STOP ITs or use body language to send her a clear message when she does something she shouldn't be doing. well, sometimes she gets it, sometimes she does not.

We have a problem in balancing the level of affection and the process of setting up the boundaries. She behaves ok when we put a distance. As soon as we start petting her or playing with her she acts out by nipping at us or not responding whatever we say.

How can we show her that we love her while also manage to set up some boundaries so as to make her listen to us? Is a two-month old puppy too young to understand this?

Thanks

PetFriendly
February 18th, 2007, 10:22 AM
It sound like you're on your way.

What you need to understand is that puppies nip to play. So what you have to do is show her a new way of telling you she wants to play. Try getting her to bring you a toy, perhaps engage her in play by taking a toy out yourself?! As far as her understanding you sometimes, and not others, I think she may be choosing to not listen to you, in which case you have to step in and be the boss... That is take away what ever she's chewing on, get her off of the furniture, etc.

Also take a minute every two hours or so to practice your commands. Start with sit, and maybe come and just keep working them until they are perfect. Training your dog is a good way to tire them out by making their brains work.

And don't worry about the walking. She's too small, and its my opinion anyway, that play is much more energy burning than simply walking down the street.

PetFriendly
February 18th, 2007, 10:33 AM
Do you have access to book stores or maybe order books online?

Aside of course from Tenderfoot's material ;) , here are two books I think you would really benefit from reading. They are more than just training books, they will help you underdand some of the reason behind certain behaviours which makes them infinitly easier to deal with and will help you figure out training tactics.

- Good Owners, Great Dogs by Brian Kilcommons
- How to speak Dog by Stanley Coren

Spirit
February 18th, 2007, 12:08 PM
How can we show her that we love her while also manage to set up some boundaries so as to make her listen to us?

Dogs learn this from leadership, not affection. Apply rules and boundaries before affection, and it will all fall into place.

The books mentioned above are two good books to start. I also like Cesar Millan's book (Cesar's Way), because it explains things in a way that makes sense to me. I read a few others, and while I thought I understood them (and quickly forgot what I learned), a lightbulb went off after reading Cesar's Way and suddenly I was like "Oh, I GET it now!".

I also really liked "Don't shoot the dog" by Karen Pryor, but what I didn't like about it (aside from the fact that it's quite outdated) is that it's not a very easy read (the chapters tend to ramble and repeat), it talks more about the psychology behind clicker training (why it works) and behavior modification, and it doesn't apply just to dogs. However, this book might help clarify some issues you're having, and will give you a new perspective in how to deal with your own dogs (or husband/wife/kids/boss/etc) when you get frustrated.

Puppies take time, hard work, and a lot of love. But the order where it is placed is important too. Yelling "No" or "Stop" isn't going to do anything but frighten or confuse your dog if he doesn't know what "no" means (in which case you won't have to yell it in the first place).

:lovestruck: puppies :lovestruck:

Boncuk
February 18th, 2007, 02:25 PM
Ok I've just ordered It's Me or the Dog: How to Have the Perfect Pet by Victoria Stilwell and Good Owners, Great Dogs by Brian Kilcommons from amazon UK.

I hope they help us to understand what is going on. :fingerscr

Thanks a lot for the recommendations.

PetFriendly
February 18th, 2007, 09:10 PM
The books will help (they did for me and a few others I Lent them to) :thumbs up

And as an added bonus, the knowledge you'll acquire about how to communicate and train a dog will also apply to small kids! Fur and four feet aside, its amazing how many similarities there are between dealing with a dog and dealing with a two year old!

Boncuk
February 19th, 2007, 03:19 AM
PetFreindly, my wife and I are so glad that we got a dog first before we have kids. I thought I had known myself until the moment Boncuk arrived.

I have tons of things to learn for which I am not hesitant but willing to go ahead and take in as much as possible in order to improve myself and the relationship with our pup. :angel:

Boncuk
February 22nd, 2007, 11:18 AM
Hi again,

I have a bad news regarding our pup, Boncuk.

She is very sick again.

This time vets are guessing it is epilepsy. They are surprised to see epilepsy indications at such an early age. However, her seizures are getting more frequent and more intense. She is staying at the vet hospital tonight. thankfully they are taking care of her very well.

Cross your fingers for us

Hunter's_owner
February 22nd, 2007, 12:00 PM
Sorry to hear about your new puppy. I hope everything will be okay:fingerscr

PetFriendly
February 23rd, 2007, 08:56 PM
I'm so sorry to hear your pup is sick. I hope the vet will be able to make a good diagnosis fast... :grouphug:

Boncuk
February 24th, 2007, 11:11 AM
we spent the whole day at the vet yesterday where they ran some tests. the diagnosis is she has epilepsy. they said that it is genetic. so the vet started the treatment.

She responded the medication positively immediately. First she calmed down, then excessive drooling stopped this morning. Although her appetite is not so good, she acts more normal and not panicky. Before, she had severe seizures. now those are declined by the medication as well.

I am gonna take her to our vet to check out how the medication is working on her.

I will keep you posted.

Thanks a million for the support. Last two days were really a nightmare.

PetFriendly
February 24th, 2007, 06:59 PM
That mucst be horrible. I'm glad you have a vet who's willing to work with you. I can't really offer any advice, I've never had to deal with epilepsy in dogs, but I do know someone who's dog showed marked improvement when on a wheat free diet... Maybe its something you could talk to your vet about?