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What happened to the pyramid?

Prin
January 3rd, 2007, 03:24 PM
Good journalists' are taught to use the pyramid method when writing an article. The first paragraph tells pretty well the whole story- who, what, when, where and why. Now, it seems the important details are more and more dispersed among the tabloidish adjectives and descriptions. It's annoying.

Every murder article I've read in recent months says, "found dead in a pool of blood." What happened to just telling the news? He was found dead, period. Why do we need descriptions? Does it help in our understanding of the story? No, IMO.

And good journalists are supposed to leave the reader without any questions at all. Lately, that doesn't happen either. You sit there after reading a whole page article, and have a list of unanswered questions.:frustrated:

Anyway, maybe it's the papers I read, but it just feels like journalism has taken a turn into the tabloids. There's suspense (unanswered questions), drama (graphic unnecessary descriptions) and total salaciousness (graphic adjectives).

Anybody else see it? :o

technodoll
January 3rd, 2007, 03:47 PM
yeah i see it... everytime i see the word "pitbull" or "rottweiler" in a news story heading :frustrated:

hazelrunpack
January 3rd, 2007, 03:58 PM
Oh, ya... In spades!

One issue of a local paper actually carried the same AP story twice, on different pages. Both versions were edited so poorly that neither was understandable...however, if you looked at the two together, you were able to at least piece out a chain of events. :shrug: Pretty bad reporting when you have to resort to puzzle-solving to figure out the news.

I used to be able to skim a paper, finding out the pertinent information in the first paragraph and pick and choose what I read more carefully. Now I find myself getting impatient and stopping halfway through an item because I still haven't found out what the jist of the event was. :frustrated:

News casts are just as bad--all the 'teasers' before the commercial. Come on, networks! This is supposed to be news, not a game show! IMO, if they'd just report the news in a practical way, they wouldn't have to worry about losing their viewership during the commercials.

And one more gripe (as long as I'm in gripe mode :D )...don't report the news until it's news! Sometimes I think they should call it the Evening Speculation as opposed to the Evening News because most of it is just "what ifs" or "we don't have any new information, but here's an update"... :shrug:

Prin
January 3rd, 2007, 06:26 PM
don't report the news until it's news! Sometimes I think they should call it the Evening Speculation as opposed to the Evening News because most of it is just "what ifs" or "we don't have any new information, but here's an update"... Oh, I so agree. When there was the shooting at Dawson college this fall, the radio people had regular folks calling in from cell phones to say what was happening as it happened. It was just sickening. As if a panicking mom, or a horrified bystander knows what's really going on. It just created hysteria.:frustrated:

wdawson
January 3rd, 2007, 06:35 PM
found dead in a pool of blood grabs more attention tha found dead.......i'v always said the media loves to over sensationalize in the headlines.

Prin
January 3rd, 2007, 06:44 PM
Oh, yeah, the headlines, but now it's seeping into the actual article too. IMO, if they wanted to keep the ADDer's reading, they'd stick to the pyramid.

joeysmama
January 3rd, 2007, 10:13 PM
It really bugs me !:frustrated: I was reading an article today that was just full of puns. It was ridiculous. It wasn't funny and it was as if someone challenged the author to see how many puns he could get into the story or how silly he could make it sound.

And it was in the science section !!! For Pete's Sake ! It wasn't a fluffy entertainment article about pop stars or something. It was about an archelogical find. I wanted to read the facts, not jokes.

Prin
January 4th, 2007, 01:02 AM
Yeah, and then they blame the looming death of newspapers on the internet and tv... :rolleyes: If people "appeal to our lowest faculties" (I think that's Noam... deaded Noam...), we're bound to get bored and look for better, more organized news elsewhere.:rolleyes: