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Raw Eggs...

JanM
December 11th, 2006, 11:00 PM
Do many people feed their dogs raw eggs? How many - 1 a week or ??
I'd really appreciate getting some feedback on this - I've heard so many different opinions that it gets very confusing! Some say they are bad for dogs, others say they are wonderful for their coats...

technodoll
December 11th, 2006, 11:05 PM
mine get about 5 raw eggs each, per week... even humans eat raw eggs (ya know... those "power shakes" :yuck: ) so yeah, they're perfectly safe to give to dogs if they're tolerated! in fact they are mother nature's "perfect food", so to speak. go for it! :thumbs up

Lissa
December 12th, 2006, 10:34 AM
If you are worried, give the yolk raw and cook the white. But if you want to cook the entire egg, I wouldn't bother giving it to your dog because the heat will kill all the nutrients (in particular biotin/EFA's). By cooking the egg white, you will kill the avidin which is the "dangerous" part in eggs (because avidin can cause protein deficiency)

Dodger gets whole/raw organic eggs a few times a week.

technodoll
December 12th, 2006, 10:40 AM
lissa, not really... from http://www.provet.co.uk/health/diseases/eggwhite.htm


Many clinical nutrition books discuss biotin (one of the water soluble vitamin B complex) as being an essential nutrient which can be bound by avidin, which is found in raw egg white. This binding prevents it's absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. Fortunately cooking deactivates this effect of avidin, and egg yolk is so high in biotin content that biotin deficiency does not occur when whole raw eggs are fed. So, whilst biotin deficiency is a potential problem - in reality it is unlikely to be seen in domesticated animals unless they are fed an extremely imbalanced ration that is predominantly egg white.

On the positive side - raw chicken egg white does of course have some nutritional value and contains the following :

88.3% water
9% protein
Trace of fat
Trace of carbohydrate
Minerals -
Sodium - 190mg/100g
Chlorine - 170mg/100g
Potassium - 150mg/100g
Phosphorus - 33mg/100g
Magnesium - 11mg/100g
Calcium - 5mg/100g
Vitamins and vitamin precursors
Tryptophan (an amino acid and niacin precursor in dogs and other species but not cats, mink or fish) - 2.6 mg/100g
Riboflavin - 0.43 mg/100g
Pantothenate 0.3 mg/100g
Folate - 13 mg/100g
Biotin - 7 mg/100g
Vitamin C - 0
Vitamin D -0
Vitamin E - 0
No dietary fibre
36 kcal energy per 100g

JanM
December 12th, 2006, 05:19 PM
WOW - there's an eye-opener for me. Thank you all for sharing your knowledge. My two Goldens will now get at least 2 raw eggs each per week! Thanks again..

technodoll
December 12th, 2006, 09:44 PM
good luck JanM! hope they like it :thumbs up

Lissa
December 14th, 2006, 11:30 AM
lissa, not really...

There's equal amounts of studies showing that there is not enough biotin in egg whites to bind ALL of the avidin.

"However, recently a subscriber, Dr. Sharma, PhD, who is a biochemist with Bayer, contacted me about this issue. His investigation into the matter revealed that there is not enough biotin in an egg yolk to bind to all the avidin present in the raw whites. He found that 5.7 grams of biotin are required to neutralize all the avidin found in the raw whites of an average-sized egg. There are only about 25 micrograms -- or 25 millionths of a gram -- of biotin in an average egg yolk. This is obviously not nearly enough to do the job. For this very reason, controlled diets of only raw egg whites lead to severe biotin deficiency" http://www.mercola.com/

It's not something that worries me because I am giving Dodger free-range organic eggs...I'm not sure I'd feel as comfortable giving raw supermarket eggs.

technodoll
December 14th, 2006, 11:37 AM
i agree... for every study saying something, there is another one saying the contrary. it's enough to drive you mad! maaad, i tell you! :D

It's not something that worries me because I am giving Dodger free-range organic eggs...I'm not sure I'd feel as comfortable giving raw supermarket eggs.

i wish i could afford those nice eggs, for the dogs AND for us. they're so bloody expensive around here :( (we do through a dozen eggs per week so yeah, at $5 per pack... i have to buy the cheap ones :o ) lissa you are so lucky though!!

Lissa
December 14th, 2006, 11:45 AM
I know what you mean...there's way too much conflicting studies out there...Our old dog used to get raw supermarket eggs and was fine so it makes you wonder!

The only reason Dodger gets the "best" eggs is because my friend's family is a small-time organic farmer (the meat is way too expensive and he already has regulars he sells to but only charges me $2 for a dozen eggs).... the downside is that I get to clean up the chicken-poop covered shells:yuck:

technodoll
December 14th, 2006, 11:58 AM
The only reason Dodger gets the "best" eggs is because my friend's family is a small-time organic farmer (the meat is way too expensive and he already has regulars he sells to but only charges me $2 for a dozen eggs).... the downside is that I get to clean up the chicken-poop covered shells

hey for that price, bring on the poop! :D

my brother raised chickens for two years (two "crops"...) and he gave us some eggs once, freshly hatched from the morning, and I tell you they were the best i ever had... the shell was more delicate and thinner, and the eggs just fried up wonderfully light and fluffy in the pan and oooh the taste :cloud9:

he had no time to bring the chickens to slaughter the 2nd summer so he let them pig out for a few more weeks than recommended... we ended up buying two 15 lbs chickens from him (no feathers, heads or feet either :eek: ) and then he said never again! :o

stergeR
September 7th, 2007, 12:17 AM
there are eggs fortified with Zeaxanthin, Lutein and Vitamin E or with heart-healthy Omega 3 fatty acids..etc

wondering, is it okay to feed those?

TIA

Mia101
September 7th, 2007, 04:49 AM
I like to feed raw eggs, but wonder how many she can use now that her food has them (Canidae).

Does anyone know the optimum amount to give, taking into account what's already in her dry and canned food?

Thanks

want4rain
September 7th, 2007, 07:56 AM
i read a few places to feed an egg per 10lbs, weekly i feed Mister a total of 8 eggs (being 80lbs) but never in one sitting and usually with his 'meat' days and not offal days. usually 6 on one meat day where i dont have a full serving and then the other two are when i think about it. this winter i will probably cut out most of his eggs.

one thing up there from before that i would like to dispute, you see a lot of people say when you cook it its worthless when it isnt. when you cook it you ALTER the balance of the food but you dont render it worthless. if it were worthless there would be no point in eating any food cooked as human beings.

heat doesnt kill all of the nutrients, it alters the balance so you have to modify the diet to make up for what you altered. a raw diet is 'unaltered'. you dont have to make up for deficiencies in the food.

if you look at a prey model diet, dogs and cats would only get eggs through out the spring and a bit of the summer and NOT in the fall or winter. they eat more organ meat to make up for that or they store nutrition in their fat.

eggs are a wonderfully balanced food, low in carbohydrate, low in fat and high in QUALITY protein and vites/minerals.

in the wild, less is more. dont over indulge your pets. in nature they only get eggs a few months out of the year.


(sorry Lissa... i havet had any coffee this morning!! dont mean to be rude!!)

But if you want to cook the entire egg, I wouldn't bother giving it to your dog because the heat will kill all the nutrients (in particular biotin/EFA's).

-ashley


PS. here is a page that shows you how heat alters taurine in different things (for those of you with raw fed cats, this sheet is pretty cool). scroll most of the way down and you will see a atomic teal colored chart. taurine is not destroyed, just reduced by heat.

http://www.serve.com/BatonRouge/taurine_chmr.htm

amaya
September 7th, 2007, 10:29 AM
As part of her natural diet, I feed my dog 1 raw egg with her morning meal of oats, a bit of milk, honey and supplements (after Dr. Pitcairns Natural Health for dog & Cats). She is doing great on this diet. Of course we are lucky as we get fresh free range farm eggs form a local farmer.

After years of feeding her home made food, I switched to a natural brand of kibble for a while. She became more and more lethargic and unhappy and her coat was dull. If I absolutely have to feed kibble (like when I am watching friends dogs that eat kibble), I add an egg. That makes her happy.

stergeR
September 10th, 2007, 07:22 AM
anyone gave Quail Eggs?
is it just as nutritional? TIA