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lanky stage for pitbull puppies?

APBT_owner
December 11th, 2006, 03:15 PM
my pitbull pup turned 5 months old on thanksgiving day...since i have been given him solid gold holistic food..his ennergy levels, coat and overall appearence have changed for the better...

anyways, he seems to be going through a lanky stage...still very muscular and no ribs or anything showing...he measures 17 inches at the shoulders right now.just appears that his legs look longer..i was told that pitbulls stop getting taller at around 6 months and just start to widen and fill out..is this true?

~michelle~
December 11th, 2006, 03:52 PM
i dont know about pits but i know most breeds go through a lanky awkward looking stage. and then they will fill out

MyBirdIsEvil
December 11th, 2006, 04:22 PM
It depends on the line.
Though a reputable breeder breeds for APBTs within a certain weight range, the growth rate in each dog depends on the lines the breeder is breeding.

A good breeder can give you a general idea of what kind of growth rate their dogs usually have, though some individual dogs will grow differently. The growth rate in the dogs they raise themselves may be different than the ones they sell though, souly based on the diet you feed, overall health, etc.

Pit Bulls from different breeders will all grow and turn out differently since APBT breeders individually have different preferences on what build they want their dogs to have. The APBT doesn't have a strict standard, not to mention there are a lot of terrible breeders, so there's a HUGE variation in dogs, and while one persons puppy may grow and turn out one way, yours may grow and turn out completely different.

There are some breeds which have pretty standard growth rates, and you can sometimes find charts online, but APBTs aren't one of those.

In general, most dogs, no matter the breed, go through a lanky stage between 3-6 months.

APBT_owner
December 12th, 2006, 12:46 AM
i kind of figured that...

the breeder i got him from is a very good breeder and all his dogs are kept indoors at night and during bad weather and all are very friendly. thier dogs tend to be a bit bigger than average....im pretty sure he will fill out. he is on a high protien holistic diet with lots of exercise and vitamins. we had to fill out an application with references and they actually called my wifes parents and talked to them...

Prin
December 12th, 2006, 12:50 AM
What solid gold are you feeding? The holistique blendz one is too low protein, IMO, and that might be reducing the muscle mass, if that's what you're feeding.

MyBirdIsEvil
December 12th, 2006, 02:31 AM
the breeder i got him from is a very good breeder and all his dogs are kept indoors at night and during bad weather and all are very friendly. thier dogs tend to be a bit bigger than average....im pretty sure he will fill out. he is on a high protien holistic diet with lots of exercise and vitamins. we had to fill out an application with references and they actually called my wifes parents and talked to them...

A reputable breeder is determined by whether or not they do testing on the parents for problems with eyes, hips, heart, etc. BEFORE the puppies are bred, whether their dogs have competed in conformation or working competition, how many dogs they breed, how often, and how many litters they have.
:sorry: :offtopic: Someone who throws a couple of mutts together to give away may call and ask for references and treat their dogs well, but it doesn't make them reputable. Reputable breeders don't breed for above or below average sized dogs either. They may have a preference as to what end of the weight standard they breed their dogs, but if they breed intentionally for above or below standard that's pretty suspect, IMO.

I'm not trying to be rude, it's just that I know a few very very reputable breeders of APBTs and some very bad ones, and the bad ones will lie and do everything they can to appear reputable and decieve their customers. It makes me angry because people think they're getting good dogs, when in reality they're bred with attributes that no reputable breeder would produce.

I'm not necessarily saying your breeder is a bad one, but the things you pointed out in your comment don't automatically make a good breeder.

This link talks about OFAs and CERFs:
http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=33403

If your breeder hasn't done any of that on the parents BEFORE they were bred, their quality is suspect. The breeder should also have actual proof that these tests were done.