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Which breed of dog should we get for our situation?

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 01:57 AM
Hello Everyone,

My wife and I just moved into a large house on 8 acres of land. We are looking for a couple of dogs that fit the following criteria:

- outdoor dogs (they will live in a nice heated dog house)
- will bark when strangers come onto the property
- are safe with children and people that haven't met before
- will mercilessly chase away the geese and deer that cause problems on the property. If they can get rid of moles, that would be an added benefit.
- will patrol the property at night as well as the day
- will stay on our property

We are new to owning dogs, but are willing to put in the time and effort to train the right dogs for us.

We look forward to your responses.

TeriM
December 11th, 2006, 02:01 AM
IMO you should only have dogs if you want them to be an integrated part of your family not just a guard animal.

erykah1310
December 11th, 2006, 02:04 AM
WEll im sorry but your not gonna get nice replies.

No dog should be an outdoor dog, they need to be a part of the family.
NO breed of dog is automatically safe with new people and children ( they need socialization to achieve that)
No dog should be loose and running free on property, there is tons of dangers in the country too ( coyotes, hunters, disease, getting lost, cars, angry farmers who your dog could harm their livestock)
No dog will just stay on your property. There is no breed characteristic that states the breed will do that. Again lots of training .

I think you are looking more for a security system than a dog. Dogs are pack members and if you do not allow it to be a tightly knit pack member then it will go off in search of a pack.
SOrry Im sure these are not the kind of responses you were looking for

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 02:09 AM
The acreage is fenced, and they will be an integral part of the family. They will just live outside, that's all. Unfortunately we have about $60,000 worth of new hardwood flooring that I suspect would not hold up to dog claws. I would love to have the dogs live inside if someone can tell me how to make the flooring last more than a year or two.

erykah1310
December 11th, 2006, 02:18 AM
I Have hardwood flooring as well in my living room aka the dogs room and their claws dont damage the floors (especially not the new stuff) its a matter of keeping their nails short.

I think that no matter what breed you choose you may end up disappointed, dogs (especially puppies) destroy things its doggie nature. what about when the dog digs up the back yard? could happen.
Maybe an older rescue would be a better idea than a puppy? Calmer, you know their temperment, can try them out around kids and see if you are comfortable with that? So many benefits to a rescue.

TeriM
December 11th, 2006, 02:19 AM
OK, but how are they going to live inside if they are out patrolling the property all night?

If you are serious about having the dogs as family members who live indoors with you then unfortunately you may have some damage to your floors. This is easily minimized by keeping their nails trimmed short and using carpet runners in very high traffic areas.

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 02:25 AM
I would install a doggie door so they could come and go as they please. I would really like them to be able to smell or hear the deer when they are on our property as they are destroying all our sapling trees and eating the fruit on the fruit trees.

I would also like to mention that my wife and I are fortunate enough to be home all day and are able to give our dogs plenty of attention.

Are there no breed suggestions out there?

erykah1310
December 11th, 2006, 02:27 AM
Perhaps a shepherd or malamute( but they are not protective at all with strangers)
:shrug:

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 02:33 AM
I don't want them to be dangerous to anyone, I just want them to bark when someone approaches who they don't know. The reason we want this is because our property intersects a very popular walking path (old railway bed) and we have seen people on our property looking at our house, etc. It can be very unnerving for my wife, especially when she is alone.

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 02:35 AM
I saw an ad in the local paper offering shepherd / border collie cross puppies for sale. Would these dogs be happy in our situation?

erykah1310
December 11th, 2006, 02:35 AM
well perhaps look up some breeders in your area and contact them and see what they say:shrug: Im sorry im not really that experienced with Picking a breed. my dogs just kinda happened.

Would you consider a rescue?

erykah1310
December 11th, 2006, 02:36 AM
I saw an ad in the local paper offering shepherd / border collie cross puppies for sale. Would these dogs be happy in our situation?

Do you have kids?

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 02:37 AM
Yes I would if they met our needs. The reason I'm looking for two dogs is so they can keep each other company if they were to live outdoors.

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 02:41 AM
We have a 15 year old and a 9 year old. Both boys.

erykah1310
December 11th, 2006, 02:42 AM
Not many rescues or breeders will adopt their dogs as outdoor pets.
Many people on here are involved in rescue in some way and strongly feel thats the way to go. Sometimes there are dogs available who must remain together. Worth looking into.
I dont recommend a Border Collie or BC mix for first time dog owners, they need LOTS of attention stimulation and training to be happy well tempered family pets. They are a LOT of work. They are almost too smart for their own good and if they get bored... watch out!!!!:eek: They WILL amuse themselves in any way.

Maybe in the morning more people will have better help for you. Im not sure what to say, but i dont recommend getting those pups, :(

erykah1310
December 11th, 2006, 02:44 AM
Also 2 puppies the same age is alot of HARD work. I wouldnt do it and I have had dogs my whole life.

TeriM
December 11th, 2006, 02:44 AM
I saw an ad in the local paper offering shepherd / border collie cross puppies for sale. Would these dogs be happy in our situation?

Sounds like a possible choice but these would be very high energy dogs. This board is also very against back yard breeder (someone who keeps having puppies and selling them) and very pro spay/neuter so please make sure that this isn't that sort of a situation. Puppies require a lot of work including socialization and training. One problem with litter mates is they tend to bond more to each other then to the owners unless you specifically work hard to address that situation.

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 02:45 AM
Thank you for your helpful and honest response erykah1310

erykah1310
December 11th, 2006, 02:45 AM
No problem.

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 02:46 AM
Sounds like a possible choice but these would be very high energy dogs. This board is also very against back yard breeder (someone who keeps having puppies and selling them) and very pro spay/neuter so please make sure that this isn't that sort of a situation. Puppies require a lot of work including socialization and training. One problem with litter mates is they tend to bond more to each other then to the owners unless you specifically work hard to address that situation.

<sigh> so much to learn!

TeriM
December 11th, 2006, 02:50 AM
LOL, yes, it's a never ending process :frustrated: . We tend to be very passionate about our animals here and expect others to be the same :D .

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 02:53 AM
I think I need a "dog consultant". Is there anyone out there reputable who I could discuss my needs with in detail and they recommend the most suitable dogs for my situation without prejudice or judgement? I'm serious about this and apologize if this post sounds strange to anyone out there.

happycats
December 11th, 2006, 06:31 AM
I don't know where you are located, but i know our local Humane Society has a "country companions" for adoption, mature dogs they feel would be best suited in a rural area. Here's the site. http://www.torontohumanesociety.com/adopt/adoptiononline.asp
I am sure they would be more then happy to speak with you, to ensure you get a dog/s best suited to your situation.

I do however believe in order for a dog to be everything you want it to be (non-aggressive, but bark, good with kids) They NEED to be a big part of your family, and being an outside only dog, will make that very difficult if not impossible.

Dogs thrive on pleasing, and being with their human family, and even if you have the best dog kennel out there with everything, that means nothing to them if they can't be with you.

muckypup
December 11th, 2006, 06:38 AM
I would say German Shepherds would be the best breed for your situation but are defiantly not dogs for inexperienced dog handlers and can in fact can be quiet dangerous in the wrong hands.
However if you were going to go this route I would suggest trying a working dog kennel where the dogs are accustomed to living in kennels and go for a trained adult dog so you know exactly what your getting.

Kristin7
December 11th, 2006, 09:54 AM
I had a herding dog mix in the past and she was not super high energy. Could depend on the mix or just the dog itself, but you may not be able to tell with a puppy. I think mine was a Border Collie mix as she played like the ones I've seen in the dog park. She also looked like an Australian Cattle dog. She was moderate energy, great with strangers/kids and would give a warning bark. Also was great off-leash and tended to stay near me. Based on what you've said, I do think a herding dog type would be good for your situation, or possibly a flock guardian. I agree with other posters about not having your dogs outside all the time. If they aren't, they might not feel like they are part of the family pack. And two pups would be a handful! Although not a substitute for advice from dog experts, I like this website to research breeds.

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/a-z.htm

~michelle~
December 11th, 2006, 10:39 AM
the property is fenced but your still getting deer? maybe a taller fence would be easier. also if the property is fenced why are you worried about a dog staying on the grounds? all dogs if bored will run and find something to do. i think they should be monitored while outside. i would not recommend a malimute, they love to run and will dig out or jump fences if they want to run.
a secuirty system would keep away intruders.
for a first time dog owner you are really asking to train your dog to do alot, it can be difficult esp. when you dont know too much about dog behaviour and training.
your dog will need to be a part of of the family and well socialized to get along well with children. most dogs that are not socialized well with children dont understand them and can be intimidated by them, or short tempered with them.(not true for all dogs as i do have a dog that didnt like children at first because of the unknown but he loves them now, but it can be true for many)
i am not meaning to sound rude but an honest question, do you want a dog for companionship as well as these other traits? because you can really find other ways of accomplishing what you would like without a dog. i am just trying to look out for the future dog, and your family.
training a dog to do all of this will take alot of time and effort and some professional help.
i do wish you the best of luck and if you feel a dog is right for you i wish you the best of luck!

jessi76
December 11th, 2006, 11:21 AM
instead of asking us (strangers) to guess a breed for your family, why not have a family meeting on the issue? have each person write down 3 breeds they like. As a family, research EACH breed. their characterists, food/health /grooming requirements, living condition requirements, training & exercise requirements, etc... this should help you narrow it down. once narrowed down, then we could provide info based on experience, and/or point you in a direction (shelter/rescue/breeder).

don't forget, this time of year is VERY hectic. you should consider waiting until after the holidays to introduce a new dog.

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 12:05 PM
[QUOTE=~michelle~;333946]the property is fenced but your still getting deer? maybe a taller fence would be easier. also if the property is fenced why are you worried about a dog staying on the grounds?


I'm not worried about the dog staying on the grounds and a deer fence doesn't work, especially when you have a formal gate that is lower than the deer fence.


i am not meaning to sound rude but an honest question, do you want a dog for companionship as well as these other traits?


yes I do.


training a dog to do all of this will take alot of time and effort and some professional help.



We're prpared for that.

phoenix
December 11th, 2006, 12:12 PM
Dogs don't really hurt hardwood if you trim their nails.

I do think that there are some dogs that like to live outside. The caveat? You have to 'live outside' too. I have one that would far prefer to be outside all of the time, he would like to live on a farm and he never wants to be in. (he does live inside, despite his preferences, but twice a week he goes to a farm and LOVES it). That said, when he goes there, his people (my parents) are always outside too. He stays on the property, never wanders, etc because he has lots of jobs to do (check out the property, play ball, carry sticks, etc) with my dad as he does farm chores. The dogs do come in at night if it is cold, otherwise they stay in the garage in a big bed of straw. He has made it clear that he would rather live there than here!! (haha). He is a lab/boxer cross. My parents have a lab/shep cross and he has lived outside his whole life and adapted well to it.

I looked into the kuvasz once, for my parents. Definitely an outdoor breed. However, bred to work with the farmer day in and day out. You say you are home, are you outside most of the time, doing things? If so, that kind of dog might be great for you, they are very protective but also like kids. You might have to get a little sheep herd for him to have something to do!

It's hard to say, because if you are a first time owner, you would do better with an adult dog that is already trained (ie. a rescue) but most won't allow outdoor adoptions (which I don't agree with if it is going to be a working dog, because dogs with jobs are very happy in my experience). If a dog is going to live out but have lots of human companionship and have a purpose in life, seems to me that's far better than staying 12 h in a crate during the day. (I don't think crating is cruel, just that each life has its ups and downs).

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 06:24 PM
Can some one direct me to the best web site or source for researching breeds?

~michelle~
December 11th, 2006, 06:28 PM
wow there are tons!! what do you feel about german shepards? they seem like something that might suit your situation. my suggestion is that you take ontario grey's suggestion get the family together and research specific breeds each breed will have its own clubs, and breed specific rescuegroups often tell you alot about the breeds personality

Inverness
December 11th, 2006, 06:35 PM
chernoff, the kind of work you need to have done is suited for big herding dogs, like Great Pyrenees. However, these dogs have strong temperaments and are not a good choice for first-time dog owners. You would be better off contacting a breed rescue who would be able to tell you if they have a dog who has already been temperament assessed and who could become a part of your family.

I, personnaly, do not adopt dogs out if they are to live outdoors. However, I am not against dogs working, quite the contrary. You just want to rethink the whole thing and find a way to integrate the dog into your life in a different manner, perhaps with the use of a doggy door as you mentionned.

Have you mentionned where you live so we can direct you to the appropriate resources ?

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 07:06 PM
I live in the Okanagan Valley in British Columbia. I didn't know that dogs won't scratch the hardwood if the nails are kept trim. We would love to have an indoor dog, but we would need it to go outside sometime during the night to chase away the deer, as they only come at night. For a little while any way, until the deer don't bother coming around anymore.

Is there not a website somewhere that discuss the attributes of all the breeds? If had an indoor dog, we would like it to be non-shedding and non-allergenic ( I can see you all rolling your eyes now). Would a full size poodle chase deer and bark when someone is on the property?

muckypup
December 11th, 2006, 07:19 PM
I live in the Okanagan Valley in British Columbia. I didn't know that dogs won't scratch the hardwood if the nails are kept trim. We would love to have an indoor dog, but we would need it to go outside sometime during the night to chase away the deer, as they only come at night. For a little while any way, until the deer don't bother coming around anymore.

Is there not a website somewhere that discuss the attributes of all the breeds? If had an indoor dog, we would like it to be non-shedding and non-allergenic ( I can see you all rolling your eyes now). Would a full size poodle chase deer and bark when someone is on the property?

Standard Poodles are cool, I'm sure they would chase deer for the fun of it and bark at strangers but not protect.

My dogs nails are as short as they can go but they still scratch the finish on the hardwood floors but I don't care I love my dogs much more than the floor.

Prin
December 11th, 2006, 07:27 PM
Mine too. IMO, if your life barely has room for a dog and the dog has to fit so many conditions, maybe now isn't the right time.:o

heidiho
December 11th, 2006, 07:31 PM
I just have to say from someone who got a gsd and knew they were smart,but didnt know just how smart,be sure you do before you decide on one,they are my favorite but i should of done alot of reading and learning about them before i did,now i do not have mine because of it.and i cant imagine getting a dog that is gonna be made to live in a place outside of the home where the people are,it sounds sad to me.

Inverness
December 11th, 2006, 07:57 PM
I live in the Okanagan Valley in British Columbia. I didn't know that dogs won't scratch the hardwood if the nails are kept trim. We would love to have an indoor dog, but we would need it to go outside sometime during the night to chase away the deer, as they only come at night. For a little while any way, until the deer don't bother coming around anymore.

Is there not a website somewhere that discuss the attributes of all the breeds? If had an indoor dog, we would like it to be non-shedding and non-allergenic ( I can see you all rolling your eyes now). Would a full size poodle chase deer and bark when someone is on the property?

Visit www.akc.org

You'll have descriptions, photos, videos and resources.

BMDLuver
December 11th, 2006, 08:11 PM
Can I just point out that if a dog chases a deer or harms a deer in anyway that dog is as good as dead if it's reported to the wildlife authorities.

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 08:19 PM
I just have to say from someone who got a gsd and knew they were smart,but didnt know just how smart,be sure you do before you decide on one,they are my favorite but i should of done alot of reading and learning about them before i did,now i do not have mine because of it.and i cant imagine getting a dog that is gonna be made to live in a place outside of the home where the people are,it sounds sad to me.

What is a "gsd"?

Inverness
December 11th, 2006, 08:20 PM
What is a "gsd"?

German Shepherd Dog.

maggiemay
December 11th, 2006, 09:24 PM
I love researching different breed types and their characteristics, im always wanting anew dog but they all always seem to need things that i cant give them. anyways i usually go to www.dogbreedinfo.com, but Eukanuba and Iams both have their own sites and AkC does as well. You can compare and contrast them if you wish. Also there is a website for every breed out there specifically designed for them. I think that a saint bernard would be a good dog, my neighbor has one and he is a blast and he doesnt even have to be kept busy. Almost all dogs will bark at strangers if there arent many people coming and going all of the time, but you have to make sure you post Wanging Dog signs otherwise if your dog was to bite someone and you didnt post signs you might be held liable. you might want to look into that of course. Also my aunt and uncle have always had a dog that they keep outside all of the time with no fence, and its always there. of course they have cats too and barnyard animals. they are happy as can be, i am sure that my dog would rather it be that way. Besides arent wolves outside all of the time.... Also the breed of dog you choose might depend on the type of weather you get warm cold? Their coats are all suited to different types of weather.... well arent i chatty sorry bout the long message hope this helps. good luck with the new comers!

t.pettet
December 11th, 2006, 09:50 PM
Dogs are pack animals and need to be with their humans to learn social skills and whats acceptable so if they're never inside then your boys and the dogs will not learn the proper way to interact with each other. Untrained large beeed pups can cause injuries to your family when they playfully jump-up or want to play tug-of-war with your pant legs or jacket sleeves and discipline must be carefully applied or you will cause aggression. Puppies need alot of discipline and training by skilled owners to become great adults - this is not a job for the novice and cannot be accomplished when the dogs are isolated outside with minimum human contact. Are you not going to be sleep deprived with 2 barking dogs who are chasing deer in the middle of the night? I can't see having both of your wishes fulfilled without some compromise on your part but I can see 2 out-of-control, unsocialized, untrained dogs at the age of 6 mos. being dumped at the local shelter.

chernoff
December 11th, 2006, 09:58 PM
I love researching different breed types and their characteristics, im always wanting anew dog but they all always seem to need things that i cant give them. anyways i usually go to www.dogbreedinfo.com, but Eukanuba and Iams both have their own sites and AkC does as well. You can compare and contrast them if you wish. Also there is a website for every breed out there specifically designed for them. I think that a saint bernard would be a good dog, my neighbor has one and he is a blast and he doesnt even have to be kept busy. Almost all dogs will bark at strangers if there arent many people coming and going all of the time, but you have to make sure you post Wanging Dog signs otherwise if your dog was to bite someone and you didnt post signs you might be held liable. you might want to look into that of course. Also my aunt and uncle have always had a dog that they keep outside all of the time with no fence, and its always there. of course they have cats too and barnyard animals. they are happy as can be, i am sure that my dog would rather it be that way. Besides arent wolves outside all of the time.... Also the breed of dog you choose might depend on the type of weather you get warm cold? Their coats are all suited to different types of weather.... well arent i chatty sorry bout the long message hope this helps. good luck with the new comers!


Thank you for your sensible and helpful post Maggiemay.

Kristin7
December 12th, 2006, 09:02 AM
try these sites:
http://animal.discovery.com/breedselector/dogselectorindex.do
http://www.dogweb.nl/hondenrassen/dogbreeds.html
http://www.hoflin.com/BR/BreedReviewsIndex
http://www.doggies.com/#C
http://www.dog-breeds.net/
http://www.faqs.org/faqs/dogs-faq/breeds/
http://www.k9country.com/perl/dogBreed.pl
http://www.petfinder.com/

Can you tell I enjoy researching dog breeds, ha ha! I think you will be able to find a dog to suite most of your needs, purebred or not, although you may not find 100% of what you are looking for. Sometimes local shelters have match makers, you might look into that. I don't know if petfinder serves your area, but on it you can find breed rescue groups and may even find a dog you like. I do think some dogs do like to live outside, if you have to go that way, but certainly would need lots of human contact and socialization or you could run into trouble down the road. The flock guards are good for this (such as Great Pryrenees or Anatolian shephard), but it does seem that many of those types are not recommended for first time dog owner. For any dog you want to live outside, look into the more independent types. It may be that once you have a dog or two roaming the property, the deer will smell it and stay away.

chernoff
December 12th, 2006, 12:54 PM
Thanks to all who responded, I have a lot of research to do.

Angie J
December 12th, 2006, 02:08 PM
HI there,
I have a 9 month Newf who:LOVES it outside, wont budge from the house yard area, is GREAT with kids and will bark at anything that moves.
That being said....
He loves my daughter because he spent so much time socializing with her, indoors when we were home, and outdoors when we were outdoors.
( Crated when we were away from home. Not outside alone)

He learned the acceptable parimeters of the house because we were outside with him EVERY moment he was outdoors (reguardless of the acreage.. dogs dont recognise surveyers posts... or fencing for that matter) until he was taught to stay in the yard.

Although he LOVES it outdoors, I would never have him sleep outdoors ... unless he asked to go out.... as, he is a more affective guardian indoors where he will wake us. If its prowlers youre afraid of, they could easily poison or shoot the dog outdoors. Deer will keep a distance just with the smell of dog about... they dont need to be physically present.

If you are worried about doggie nails, section off an acceptable area of the house that you can designate in your mind as the dogs home base. It has to be large and have people in it or it doesnt count. The kitchen is our area; Lots of trafic, food and floor mats to cuddle on with them. In that area forgo the floor.... treat it... get lots of area rugs with non slip bottoms (which can also be washable :thumbs up ), replace that area with tile.

It seems like alot of work for just a dog... but these are all things a dog (a pack animal remember) needs to be part of your family without you being disappointed with Him in the end. Many dogs wander because they are in search of a pack, or learn destructive habbits because they are lonely, or WORSE yet, dont train well because they are left to their own canine devices.... you need to make your family His pack to keep him devoted, nearby, and a great family member.

Sum up
Newfs are good family dogs..lol.

PS. Also, I got my dog from Rescue.... the perfect resource to get a great dog!

Angie J
Ontario, Canada

Prin
December 12th, 2006, 02:11 PM
You have a newf?! A newf?!!?! You have to post pics somewhere, please! :) :cloud9:

:offtopic: :sorry:

Angie J
December 12th, 2006, 02:14 PM
LOL...
As soon as I learn how and where.
And a Bernese Mt. Dog... They are a great pair!

Angie J

Prin
December 12th, 2006, 02:17 PM
There's a pic section. You can use either an image hosting site, like www.photobucket.com or if they're under 100kb, you can upload them directly. :)

Sorry again.:offtopic: :sorry:

Angie J
December 12th, 2006, 02:53 PM
:sorry: :offtopic:
Sorry to again respond on this thread (forgive me... Ièm a newbie). Just one question. Can I post message someone individually on this site.
If I CAN I would tell Prin I have now posted pics.
How do you post personal messages.

Angie j

meb999
December 12th, 2006, 03:52 PM
:sorry: :offtopic:
Sorry to again respond on this thread (forgive me... Ièm a newbie). Just one question. Can I post message someone individually on this site.
If I CAN I would tell Prin I have now posted pics.
How do you post personal messages.

Angie j

At the top right corner of your screen there's a place that says : WELOME ANGIE J, then under it it says : private messages. Click on that. You can send Prin a private message (it's kinda like an e-mail), but I garantee she won't need it if you post pics of your newf (not alot gets by her!! :D )


chernoff -- I like this site --> http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/dogbreeds/index.html
it's a no-nonsence GUIDE to different dogs and their breed traits. I write GUIDE because even if a breed has a certain caracteristic, that doesn't mean that each DOG has it. Each dog is different. That's why I agree with most of the people on this board when they recommend a rescue. That way you won't have the nighmare of having a puppy destroying your new house AND you'll know what you're getting.

I like the newf idea, or bernese or a pyrenee, but I agree that these dogs need to be part of the family and brought indoors. Outdoor dogs that aren't part of the family can become mean dangerous towards strangers or even towards your kids (they won't know how to deal with them if they're never around them....) Dogs need human companionship.

Good luck!

happycats
December 12th, 2006, 04:59 PM
Maybe a Saint Bernard!
Not as protective as a a great pyr or anatolian(some of the flock guardian breeds are difficult to train and aren't trained the same way you would train another breed dog)

H.P.
December 12th, 2006, 06:27 PM
Hi. I had a dog who did pretty much what you want, she was a black lab/border collie mix. I don't know that all of that mix would be so good, but my Kayla was. She did not chase the deer, I think that she could not tell them apart from the horses that she knew belonged there (she also could not tell frogs and mice apart :shrug: ), but she did chase the rabbits away. She also killed ground hogs and snakes. She learned quickly where her territory ended, and stayed where she belonged. She was raised as an indoor dog initially, but when my parents took custody, she became an outdoor dog. We are a very outdoorsy family, so she was part on the family. When it was too cold for us outside, she came in the basement with the family. They kept her inside at night, due to coyotes. A single dog would not have a chance against a hungry pack. She was great with the kids, and had suburb instincts as to who she should let on the property and who to growl at, but she alwasy sounded the bark alarm. Also important, she NEVER bit anyone, she didn't need to, when her hair would stand up, and she sowed her pearly whites against the black coat, it was pretty intimidating.

OntarioGreys
December 12th, 2006, 08:43 PM
Deer can be pretty determined, I live inside the city with a conservation area a couple blocks away from me, even though I have dogs they still come onto the property, the reason no animal even a wolf is going to be in hunt mode 24 hours a day. Have you ver watched shows like national geographic where you see scenes in Africa near a watering hole where the hunter and the hunted are in close proximity to one another for example a cheetah walking by as the gazelles stand a watch as it passes, with dogs they will have periods of time where they will want to chase the deer and other times especially when exposed to them all the time where they will lose interest in them and could not care less in the walk 10 feet away from them. I have had labs who quickly lost interest in geese because they learn they are not going to be able to catch them because they take off an fly before they have a chance to get near enough, that would be the same problem with deer they learn they can never catch it will cause boredom, hunting dog can continue to enjoy if the hunter brings the animal down, then the dogs views it as success and often get rewarded for their efforts so they they learn their is a benefit in doing whenever the hunter goes hunting , but if a chase always ends with failure with no catch, it will in time become boring as there is no reward for the effort, and they may only do once in a while just for entertainment sake. I have owned a other hunting breeds as well that will spend a day hunting but the next day are so worn out and tired from running that the effort to even raise there head when a wild animal passes is too much work at the moment and will just nod off and go back to sleep. So your expectations of what a dog will do for you in unrealistic to start with. So this is problem number 1



Problems number 2, The better breeds for chasing deer, tend to be hunting breeds which are mostly short coated breeds like beagles, redbones blueticks etc off course that makes them unsuited for living outdoors also they have very little guarding instincts but not every beagle or redbone etc is going to be born with a desire to hunt, so if you are looking at start with puppies you could end up quite disappointed if you end up with one that has no interest in chasing. When I was a kid my dad raised dogs for hunting just a small number, I was involved in the training and testing some never made the grade as hunters for various reasons, though the dogs were kept outside some of the time to harden them to the weather they were also brought indoors a lot so they learned to become family members and were also taken out alot so they would well socialized

Problem number 3 Most dogs are bred for function, some herd, some hunt, some guard , so are companion some utilty most are good for the function they were breed for example, my greyhounds are are sighthounds breed to see movement at long range, that movement incites them to chase, there speed being the second fasted land mammal allows them to get near what they spotted a 1/2 mile away but they are only good as hunters for short period of time because the extreme speed they run at will zap there energy, so than they must sleep for long periods afterward to be able to do again. As herding dogs they do not have the endurance for extended periods as guard dogs the most danger would be and intruder tripping over them when they sleep they are not barkers by nature, shepherds can make good guard dogs but were not breed really to hunt, a lot of training is needed with any guard dog species to know what limit of function they should do, they were bred to protect property with their life in need be, so have the capacity to attack and kill a human if not properly trained and socialized and breeding is very important because some of the the lines can be mentally unstable and agressive so can be dangerous to have around with guests and children, and even a well breed one needs to be made an intergral of the home life inorder to learn how to behave around children and adults, dogs that are left outdoors most of the time don't get enough people socialization to learn how to interact with strangers and children and that can make them dangerous.


Problem 4 Dogs are pack animals if you get 2 and leave them outdoors most of the time they form their own pack and do not view your family as being part of their own pack, So to expect a mostly outdoor dog to be good with children is another unreasonable expectation it is not something that comes naturally and dog has to have continual contact and be trained how to behave around them and that can happen if they are left as outdoor dogs only, when they are indoors they learn kids can be clumsy and may trip on them, they learn that at meal times peoples food is not their food, so can be taught to respect a toddler who is walking around with a cookie in their hand and they also learn the toddler is above them in the pack, being raised together with the family dwelling teaches the dog they are part of the same family and what position they hold in the family, dog depend on social hierachy you and your wife become the bosses with kids next line line and they are then the bottom of the pack, a dog that is mostly confined outdoors does not get enough exposure, where you have multiple dogs outside they become a seperate pack and do not learn your family is part of the pack so will not learn they have to respect the toddler outside in their territory with a cookie because they will not view it as part of the family pack they are a pack unto themselves so because the child is now in their territory and they view it as weaker then them the view challenging and taking the cookie as fair and could lead to an attack, same with if a toddler stumbles on them they have not had the exposure to learn toddlers can be clumsy and may view the stumble as an attack on them so they fight back

A lot of your expectations about what you expect from a dog is not very realistic in general and chances are you could end up with someone getting hurt or bringing a dog into your home only to be disappointed because it is not performing all that you wanted and then taking it to animal control as an outdoor dog without a lot people interaction it would have little to no chance of being rehomed because there are simply not enough homes for all the dogs needing rehoming and others would be better suited as pets without a lot of work involved and therefore would be euthanized instead So you should really re reconsider what you are expecting and realize that no dog is going to be able to fulfill all your current expectations

CinnaAngie
December 12th, 2006, 11:22 PM
I agree with what has been said above (Ontario Greys, great post!) getting a dog means a LOT of research beforehand.

I grew up with dogs. When I left home for university many years ago, I found myself dog-less for the first time in a LONG time. When I was nearing the end of my degree (it took 6 years) I started researching for breeds that would be suitable for me (I am an archaeologist and I tend to spend my summers outdoors in a tent, so I need a dog who can go with me as it would be insane to pay for a kennel all that time! Plus, my dog doesn't get to sleep indoors if I don't!!! lol). I researched breeds on the internet, meeting dogs of those breeds that appealed to me helped as well (I have a lot of friends with dogs... plus you always run into a few dogs walking down a busy street in town), and when I had a better idea of what breed I wanted (in my case, I got a lab) I bought a whole bunch of books on the breed and even more training manuals.

I also found this website to be helpful (I think i originally found it when someone else posted it here...): http://www.k9country.com/perl/dogBreed.pl

It's a quiz which asks you questions based on what you are looking for in a dog, and then it lists suggested breeds for you. If you do a google search for "breed selection" you will find other such tests.

It took me close to two years to choose what type of dog I wanted. During this time I also saved up a nest egg for unforseeable expenses (she is a dog that LOVES the outdoors, hence the likelihood that she could get hurt goes up...especially out in the middle of nowhere when we are out on a dig in the summer). I highly recommend having everyone in the family take part in the selection. This is a decision that will impact your family for a good 10-15 years and is not one which should be taken lightly!

Daisy2943
December 22nd, 2006, 12:57 AM
This website will help you decide:
http://www.petnet.com.au/selectadog.html
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/search.htm

Mix breed dogs are typically healthier because of the diversity in their blood line. Getting two puppies at once is asking for trouble. They will bond with eachother and not as much with you also getting an older dog an a puppy will help with potty trainning. My suggestion to you is get a puppy once its learned its basic manners get the next one that way you don't have twice the messes in the house and twice the destruction also a calmer older dog is a good influence for a puppy because the older dog helps you teach the other one

brandynva
December 22nd, 2006, 09:49 AM
Have you tried the deer repellant? There are good websites you can order from too. Here are a couple of examples:

http://www.deerscram.com/


http://www.critter-repellent.com/deer/deer-repellent.php

Good luck!

Melinda
December 22nd, 2006, 10:03 AM
just on a side note, deer don't always stay away when a dog is present, I'll root up the pics of my lab, nose to nose with a deer, they know she won't chase them (trained not to) and they wander all over our yard regardless if she's out or not. The fawns are the most curious about her, the bucks more or less keep a distance between them and Brina, but they have their heads up watching her at all times, but the does walk right up to her and eat from the tree's while she lays there watching them.

jeb032302
December 23rd, 2006, 01:11 PM
Hey! Why not try a German Shepard? A heated dog house would be fine, and they probably would not run away. I grew up with labs and german shepard as a child and they are both wonderful dogs! Labs are not good watch dogs though, they are very peaceful & loving, and do chase animals! German Shepards are great watchdogs, and if raised from a puppy will be great with kids and protective! Oh yeah, and all of my dogs lived outside on our land, and only came in if it was cold! Not one ever ran away! Good luck! :)

mireland
December 26th, 2006, 09:53 AM
Female Australian Shepards sound perfect for you. They are very territorial and will stay on the property. Ours never bit but would bark a warning to us if someone came up. Also they prefer staying outside but may come in if you invite them. We used to have to catch and carry ours in if there were freezing temperatures but they did not care for the inside and would "huddle together" until we let them out. They considered it punishment. They "owned" the property. They were still an integral part of our family. They "hearded" our children everywhere and barked a warning if they got into trouble. I don't know about chasing off deer.

Angie J
December 27th, 2006, 09:28 AM
I think that an australian is a great choice!
I have known a few and they do realy enjoy the outdoors!

A caution though; They are very high energy and super smart, if you don't socialize and train them they can become bored and just become a high energy nusiance (like any working dog). Whatever your choice, don't pass on early training classes and keep your dogs mind sharp! Especially so, if you want it to be as versatile as it appears you desire it to be.

Angie J

Kristin7
December 27th, 2006, 03:38 PM
I agree, Angie J. They are great all around dogs, I researched them because my boyfriends wants one. The high energy part was the only thing that would be a caution really (for him). The OP sort of seemed to not want a high energy dog, but not sure, as they have acreage for running around, etc. My neighbor has an Aussie mix and she's great for her. No worries about people breaking in while the dog is there, as she has a bark that would make anyone pause, and would back it up if necessary. They need a job to do and guarding the property is a job.

twisten
January 4th, 2007, 03:17 PM
To the original poster, I noticed in one of your posts that you said you would like a dog that doesn't shed or shed much. Those types of dogs CANNOT live outside as they would freeze to death quickly. I believe the majority of dogs that don't shed are all toy breeds? Does anyone know of a larger breed that doesn't shed? Another thing if you are hanging a sign to warn people about your dog don't hang one that says "beware of dog". Hang one that says "guard dog on duty". We had an animal enforcement officer tell us that hanging the beware of dog sign is admitting your dog has a problem and won't protect you if the dog happens to bite someone. When I was a kid growing up we had a Norwegian Elkhound that refused to come in the house ever. It could be 40 below and he wouldn't come in. A few times we carried him in and he went nuts so we had to let him back out. He slept in the straw in our barn with the cats and loved it. Good luck with your search. The right dog is out there for you somewhere.

Bearsmom
January 14th, 2007, 06:45 AM
Mine too. IMO, if your life barely has room for a dog and the dog has to fit so many conditions, maybe now isn't the right time.:o

My GOD, Prin, that was BEAUTIFULLY said.

I'm sorry, I don't agree with getting an outdoor dog. Dogs are pack animals and need their pack.

I'm going to bite my tongue very hard now and not say anything else.

x.l.r.8
January 15th, 2007, 11:51 AM
I was following this topic with interest (more to see where I went wrong :D ) and to remind myself how much I didn't know. I wouldn'y have any other dog than Riley but I can see how it could have gone so very wrong. Firstly, from what little information I have gained from asking owners and farmers (most around here are very picky about the breed they have due to livestock) and the forst thing I though of was australian shepherd. From what I have heard they are very loyal and also very trainable. Next would be a wolfhound shepherd mix (OK I'm biased there). I'm not sure if this theory holds water but I would think it would be best to get 1 dog and train that and see what kind of temprement he/she has and then make a decission about the second, that way you can concentrate on the training and when/if you get a second you will be able to transfer the knowledge and only have one pup learning at a time. Some times the teaching thing can be very frustrating and going through it twice holds less fear then if I had to go through it once with 2 dogs.
As a side note, we have hardwood floors and so far the only damage is from me and not the dog, I am lucky enough to have a dog who does not mind having is nails clipped. At some point you will have to put your trust in the dog and your training if you want him/her to roam off leash. I'm terrified as I know the wolfhound in him has him running off at the faintest scent. However weree 1 class away for graduating to advanced where it becomes off leash so I'm going to have to be brave at some point :fingerscr . If seems like you are warming to the idea of having the dog in the house at night, a dog flap is a good idea but you need to think if the dogs can get out, other wildlife can get in. We have cat flaps with magnetic collars so the cats can come and go but the flaps are locked at night and the cats stay in. I know they have many better designs than ours as ours are 12 years old and the replacement key collar is VERY expensive so look at replacement costs and think about getting quite a few extra's if you go this route. Please don't be detered with the overwhelming opinions on this board and let us know what you decide (and of course you will have to post pics
;) ). I kinda wished I had done what you have, and asked questions before but I found this site after we had decided on Riley, but on hte other hand riley is sooo the perfect dog for us. I really hope you find the same.:dog:

Purpledomino
January 17th, 2007, 09:57 AM
Okay, this suggestion is going to sound weird, but have you considered a donkey? They are very territorial, and are wonderful for predator control. If you have 8 acres and a place for him, you may want to consider it. Anyone know of a good donkey forum??:D

happycats
January 17th, 2007, 10:12 AM
Okay, this suggestion is going to sound weird, but have you considered a donkey? They are very territorial, and are wonderful for predator control. If you have 8 acres and a place for him, you may want to consider it. Anyone know of a good donkey forum??:D

Great suggestion!

Now that you have mentioned it, I heard Ostriches are also great guard birds and are also very territorial.

I know my parents outdoor semiferal cat "Earl" loves to chase the deer away!
It's very funny to watch.
Picture 3-4 adult deer, and this little grey and white cat all puffed up walking towards them. At first the deer stomp on the spot, then as the cat gets closer they all take off, fast as lightening!! :D sorry for going :offtopic: :o

Prin
January 17th, 2007, 11:00 AM
Ooo how about a goat!? There are so many on petfinder too... Like this cutie: http://search.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=7191069 ooo this one has a beard! http://search.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=7444490

MIA
January 17th, 2007, 04:54 PM
You are better off spending the money on a banger, I think that's what they are called. Anyhow we have them in our feilds and they keep out the birds and deer. Cheaper than a dog, more realiable and easier to maintain!!!!! They sound like a potatoe gun, the nice part is they stop when needed, not like a bored dog who could bark for hours on end and drive you nuts!!!!!

DiNKy
January 18th, 2007, 11:15 PM
hi, i dont know the best place to look on the web, but i think since you have a list of prefences for the dogs you should go to your local humane society or animal shelter and talk to them. just tell them exactly what you posted on this site. they'll recommend what kind of breed is best for you, and if you're lucky they may have two available to adopt. most of the rescue centers i know have no problem letting you adopt a dog as long as the yard is fenced. and i think 8 acres is wonderful for an animal to have (i only have 1.5 acres). i personally would recommend a pit bull. they are a good working dog. i had one that was trained (he was very smart). excellent guard dog, but also good with people (not cats). however, if you do decide on a pit, check the breeders out thoroughly. make sure there is absolutely no animal abuse. i personally wouldnt buy a pit bull from a shelter (i have kids too) and you really dont know how the last owner treated them.

jesse's mommy
January 19th, 2007, 05:51 AM
:sorry: :offtopic: Dinky, just because you had one bad experience doesn't mean everyone will so please stop bashing pitbulls all over this forum. I have a pitbull that I rescued from the humane society. They found her in a field with a leash on -- abandoned. We have no history at all on her and she is the best dog in the world. For all we know, she could have been thrown from a moving car. :shrug: The point is, once she chose us, we opened our home, welcomed her into our family, and gave her lots of love.

By the way, my dog had a bad experience with a Jack Russel Terrier, do you see me bashing them everywhere? The attitude with dogs is all in how you raise them. Maybe you just weren't the right match for the dog.

PetFriendly
January 19th, 2007, 05:10 PM
i had one that was trained (he was very smart). excellent guard dog, but also good with people (not cats).

:offtopic: continued, anyone else see the irony of this statement? How does a dog who likes people make it as a guard dog?

DiNKy
January 19th, 2007, 09:27 PM
all i did was suggest a possible breed, and i'm pretty sure thats what this topic is about. and giving my personal experience with a breed also wasn't off topic. many other people gave their own experiences and suggestions too. atleast i didnt bash the fact that they wanted an outdoor dog, which by the way, to everyone that whined about that, it is not a big deal. especially when the dog has 8 acres to roam on. and as for the other comment made, it is not hard at all to have a dog trained to bark at strangers but at the same time, be a good dog to the family that it belongs to.

Prin
January 19th, 2007, 09:32 PM
Um... Usually we use this bugger :offtopic: when we go off topic. It's not you. :) Like this post should have a :offtopic: before it.:D

DiNKy
January 19th, 2007, 10:57 PM
oops, my bad. thanks for clearing that up for me:goodvibes:

pitgrrl
January 20th, 2007, 08:34 AM
i personally would recommend a pit bull. they are a good working dog. i had one that was trained (he was very smart). excellent guard dog, but also good with people (not cats). however, if you do decide on a pit, check the breeders out thoroughly. make sure there is absolutely no animal abuse. i personally wouldnt buy a pit bull from a shelter (i have kids too) and you really dont know how the last owner treated them.

I have to totally agree with Jesse's Mommy and add that pit bulls are not guard dogs. A pit bull of proper, stable temperment should have no problem letting whomever onto your property. I would be highly suspicious of anyone selling the breed as guard dogs as would I of a pit bull that showed guarding behavior.

The other obvious problem would be living outside. They're super people oriented dogs with very little fur, a combo not too well suited to living outside all the time.

DiNKy
January 20th, 2007, 11:09 AM
The other obvious problem would be living outside. They're super people oriented dogs with very little fur.

they are planning on getting 2 dogs to keep eachother company. they have kids; the dogs will surely play with them. and their fur isnt an issue--the dog houses are heated (not even my pit got a heated dog house, and he was fine outside.) and btw, Ceaser wasnt sold as a 'guard dog' he was bought from a good breeder as a puppy and proffesionally trained to bark when strangers entered our yard.

Prin
January 20th, 2007, 11:37 AM
Pits are NOT fine as outside dogs.

And the OP wants a farm dog, which a pit isn't.

DiNKy
January 20th, 2007, 12:00 PM
Hello Everyone,

My wife and I just moved into a large house on 8 acres of land. We are looking for a couple of dogs that fit the following criteria:

- outdoor dogs (they will live in a nice heated dog house)
- will bark when strangers come onto the property
- are safe with children and people that haven't met before
- will mercilessly chase away the geese and deer that cause problems on the property. If they can get rid of moles, that would be an added benefit.
- will patrol the property at night as well as the day
- will stay on our property

We are new to owning dogs, but are willing to put in the time and effort to train the right dogs for us.

We look forward to your responses.

Chernoff, if you're still looking for a dog, go to http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/danishswedishfarmdog.htm

i read the description and i think its close to what you're looking for.
but its sounds like a $$$ dog.

Prin
January 20th, 2007, 12:02 PM
Short hair, can't live outside.

DiNKy
January 20th, 2007, 12:12 PM
did you even go to the link. it said the dog loves being outside. and although it didnt mention whether or not they could live outside, the owners will have heated dog houses for them at nght. and any good owner when the whether gets cold will bring their dog in.

Prin
January 20th, 2007, 12:18 PM
I did go to the link and I saw a short haired dog. "Loves being outside" doesn't mean it can live outside, and yes, any good owner would bring a cold dog in, but this person specifically asked for an outside only dog.

IMO, there's just no point in looking, because the OP wants a dog who lives outside but doesn't shed, and that just does not exist. All the newfies and pyranees of the world have lonnnnnng fur that needs a lot of care and they shed. A lot. You can search long and hard and you won't find a dog that fits all these criteria (which is why we started to suggest livestock :D).

DiNKy
January 20th, 2007, 12:40 PM
i know the dog didnt meet all of their criteria, and i'm sure by now they've realized that no dog will. all i did was simply suggest a dog that imo would be a good choice for what they're looking for.

maybe now isn't the right time.:o

which you obviously dont agree with, because from the start you said they dont need a dog at this time. but at the same time it is their choice (and they asked about dogs), and i hope they go to the link i provided and decide for themselves and learn about this dog:)

Prin
January 20th, 2007, 02:54 PM
What don't I agree with? I said it's not the right time for them to get a dog because the dog has to meet so many conditions and no dog can do that. I've never waivered from that stance.

I would rather people realize there isn't room in their lives for a dog than to look at dogs that fit a little bit only to end up dumped a few days later because they didn't fit exactly. And I wouldn't want a short haired dog outside freezing all winter because I suggested it, either.

DayaXaron
January 26th, 2007, 04:01 PM
Well yes sorry only new here and saw your question, more then a month afther it was posted.

But i do agree with most of the remarks, dogs are family members. And they will protect, and take their jobs seriously, but they are also a member of the family. The only way you can assure yourself of a dog being faithfull and get attached to you, if by appreciating him, and making him a full part of the household, not by putting him in, even a luxuary outdoor house. He has to feel part of it all, to do his job properly. If your dog feels he belongs, even a chihuahua can be a fiercefull watchdog to protect his family. Do not get me wrong, in the end i go for the bigger ones also, I have some gentle giants. But think about this, not even for the dog's sake but for your own... what good is a guard dog when locked up in his house in the back of the garden while you get assaulted in your bed ?? My giants sleep with me.

And do not take this wrong, but if you payed $60,000 worth of new hardwood flooring, it better be decent enough in quality for a dog to walk over it.

Just little old me giving you my thoughts

Peepmouse
January 26th, 2007, 05:13 PM
When I was growing up my Dad brought home a pure bred German Shorthaired Pointer that he was originally planning to breed, but it never worked out. Patch was a beautiful dog with short hair, but he never wanted to be an inside dog. He lasted one night in our basement (too hot!), and the rest of his 12 years were spent outside in a large dog house my dad built for him. It was filled with straw and had a heavy carpet over the door to keep the wind out, and my dad said it was always toasty warm when he would open the top to change the straw. I guess because he was a water dog was the reason he was so comfortable in being outside, he had the double coat (short outer/fine downy inner). This was in a rural southern Manitoba town, where it's not unusual to get temps down to -40. He had the run of our huge back yard, and no one except kids (which he loved!) ever dared set foot inside it! He was a great guard dog! As far as keeping the deer away, I have to agree with some of the other members in that after a while the dogs and the deer will probably get used to each other and go about their own separate ways, possibly through your land.

It is possible to have an outside dog and still have them be part of the family. We played with Patch every day, and he was always following my dad around when he worked the back yard. It was very hard having him put to sleep (only after he started going blind & deaf, & ended up biting my grandfather, which he felt terrible about when he realized who he had bitten!), but I think he lived a very full and content life.:rip:

heidiho
January 26th, 2007, 06:07 PM
Is this person whom everyone is having debates about dogs over even still here..??

Prin
January 26th, 2007, 06:09 PM
lol I doubt it.:D They're probably happily settled with their non-shedding, guarding, nice to strangers, no nailed, outdoor doggy. ;)

heidiho
January 26th, 2007, 06:11 PM
:laughing: :laughing: :laughing: your funny,no s*** huh!!

wolfsoul
January 26th, 2007, 08:35 PM
A client of our's currently has CKC registered kuvasz for sale, here in Kelowna. Parents are health certified show stock. $900.

Kuvasz are a large guardian breed, bred to guard sheep from predators. I imagine they might keep the deer out though I am not sure.

If you are interested, let me know and I will pass on her contact info to you.

Sipot
February 2nd, 2007, 03:54 PM
I just wanted to comment that I agree not all dogs need to be inside nor do they want to. I have a dog that prefers to be outside all of the time regardless if it is 30 below C or not. I try to make him come in when it is that cold he comes in for a few min then is whining to go back out. He simply curls up in his dog house and is perfectly happy. When I go out he comes running out and wants to play in the snow etc. but not come in. Just because a dog lives outside doesn’t mean it is not part of the family and it is not mean to leave a dog out there either. There are plenty of breeds that can live outside in winter without a problem. My dog is hot 5 minutes after he comes in and sleeps on the cold tile floor by our drafty door instead of on his warm bed. I think Farm dogs learn to stay around the yard when they are taught to stay and my experience with barking dogs is it just depends on the dog. I have had dogs that are quiet and others that bark only after hearing other dogs bark. I think it depends. Anyway that is my 2 cents. My dog is an Orange Samoyed Golden Retriever Cross

meb999
February 2nd, 2007, 05:15 PM
did you even go to the link. it said the dog loves being outside. and although it didnt mention whether or not they could live outside, the owners will have heated dog houses for them at nght. and any good owner when the whether gets cold will bring their dog in.

I think you should take into consideration the fact that you live in texas....if the OP lives in CAnada....a short haired dog outside is a big NONO!

meb999
February 2nd, 2007, 05:20 PM
lol I doubt it.:D They're probably happily settled with their non-shedding, guarding, nice to strangers, no nailed, outdoor doggy. ;)

http://bestsmileys.com/lol/18.gif That's funny! I think you forgot 'good with kids...'

I love those family-friendly-kid-and-stranger-loving-guard-dogs-that don't shed-or-poo-or-smell-bad-or-fart!

Bearsmom
February 2nd, 2007, 10:49 PM
Hee hee heeee.

Also, another OP stated that the spca would recommend a dog for their requirements? No, they wouldn't. They'd recommend one of those robot dogs rather than the non shedding, no nailed, no barking friendly guard dog. They wouldn't even consider adopting out. At least not the one I volunteer at.

Sheesh, I'm grouchy tonight.

meb999
February 2nd, 2007, 10:53 PM
If any rescue organisation tells you they'll set you up with a stranger-loving-no-nailed-no-shedding-guard dog then you should run screaming the other way!!

Prin
February 2nd, 2007, 10:58 PM
I have a dog that prefers to be outside all of the time regardless if it is 30 below C or not. I try to make him come in when it is that cold he comes in for a few min then is whining to go back out. Boo likes to chase rabbits. He cries when I hold him back and let the rabbit get away. Doesn't mean I should let him run across the street into traffic.

I whine when I don't get enough chocolate, too, and that certainly doesn't mean it's good for me.:D

i_have_too_many
February 8th, 2007, 10:01 PM
I grew up on a farm in southern Ontario, we always had a dog of some sort, usually one that would just show up some day, or maybe a puppy that a neighbours dog had and couldnt get rid of. These dogs NEVER came in the house, my father was very strict about that. They had a dog house, and could go into the barn if they liked. That is the way the dog was raised, and they were fine with the idea. They stuck around, barked at strangers, and kept the cat population down, (I already know that I will get harped for that comment, but anyone who has lived on a farm knows what I am talking about). My parents still live on that farm, and still have a dog. She is a shep/rotti cross and is a great guard dog, people rarely get out of their cars, unless they know her, and she is great with kids. My parents picked her up from someone who was moving and needed to find her a new home, she was around 2 years at the time. My sister also had a dog that stays outside most of the time. She has one of those invisible fences to keep her on the property, and she is great with kids and also barks at strangers. She is a pointer mix.

There are dogs out there that can live very well outdoors, keep tabs on strangers and still be loyal family members. It really depends on what they are used to and how they are raised. I would certainly check out a shelter, or paper for an older mix. But if you insist on a purbreed, any of the dogs in the working group would probably do fine, they were mainly bred to be guard dogs, yet still be easy to work with and train, and sturdy enough to be outdoors. What ever you decide on, get it from a reputable place.

Just wondering, why do some of you think the dog was domesticated anyways, and where were the first dogs kept? answer: for protection, and guarding the "cave" where the people slept. After that, they were turned into pets.

erykah1310
February 8th, 2007, 11:37 PM
To me dogs are not pets either... they are family members,
I chose to get each of my dogs... therefore its my responsibility to make sure their needs are tended to. Perhaps my dogs are spoiled... perhaps I treat my dogs better than a few people I know treat their children... perhaps I am over the top...
Bottom line... My dogs are warm at night, loved, respected and needed. They are not an alarm system ( which if they had to be, they would fight to the death to protect their home) nor are they lawn ornaments... set there to "look good"
Sure we all know of the "farm dogs" who ate whatever, slept where ever, bred with all the neighbours dogs when ever, roamed the bushes when ever and so on... that have lived very full lives, but those days are behind us now... honestly farming is not nearly as common anymore, as times have changed.
So... why cant the mentality of "pet ownership" change too???
Few people now have dogs to protect their livestock, we have them as companions... as MY companions my dogs will be subjected to some of the "finer" things in life and treated as Iwould like to be treated.

animlfarm
March 7th, 2007, 05:19 PM
Seriously - there is no one breed of dog who will do all that. Maybe you should get an alarm system instead.

NO dogs should be left outdoors, dogs are PACK animals and need companionship!

heidiho
March 7th, 2007, 05:57 PM
Wow this thread is still going on,did they ever get a dog?Are they still here?