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How Smart is Your Dog?

Mahealani770
December 6th, 2006, 03:16 PM
Ranking of Dogs for Obedience/Working
Intelligence by Breed

Based on a dog trainer's survey.

Ranks 1 to 10
Brightest Dogs

Understanding of New Commands: Less than 5 repetitions.

Obey First Command: 95% of the time or better.
Rank Breed
1 Border Collie
2 Poodle
3 German Shepherd
4 Golden Retriever
5 Doberman Pinscher
6 Shetland Sheepdog
7 Labrador Retriever
8 Papillon
9 Rottweiler
10 Australian Cattle Dog


Ranks 11 to 26
Excellent Working Dogs


Understanding of New Commands: 5 to 15 repetitions.

Obey First Command: 85% of the time or better.

Rank Breed
11 Pembroke Welsh Corgi
12 Miniature Schnauzer
13 English Springer Spaniel
14 Belgian Tervuren
15 Schipperke
Belgian Sheepdog
16 Collie
Keeshond
17 German Shorthaired Pointer
18 Flat-Coated Retriever
English Cocker Spaniel
Standard Schnauzer
19 Brittany
20 Cocker Spaniel
21 Weimaraner
22 Belgian Malinois
Bernese Mountain Dog
23 Pomeranian
24 Irish Water Spaniel
25 Vizsla
26 Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Ranks 27 to 39
Above Average Working Dogs

Understanding of New Commands: 15 to 25 repetitions.

Obey First Command: 70% of the time or better

Rank Breed
27 Chesapeake Bay Retriever
Puli
Yorkshire Terrier
28 Giant Schnauzer
29 Airedale Terrier
Bouvier Des Flandres
30 Border Terrier
Briard
31 Welsh Springer Spaniel
32 Manchester Terrier
33 Samoyed
34 Field Spaniel
Newfoundland
Australian Terrier
American Staffordshire Terrier
Gordon Setter
Bearded Collie
35 Cairn Terrier
Kerry Blue Terrier
Irish Setter
36 Norwegian Elkhound
37 Affenpincher
Silky Terrier
Miniature Pinscher
English Setter
Pharaoh Hound
Clumber Spaniel
38 Norwich Terrier
39 Dalmatian

Ranks 40 to 54
Average Working/Obedience Intelligence

Understanding of New Commands: 25 to 40 repetitions.

Obey First Command: 50% of the time or better.

Rank Breed
40 Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier
Bedlington Terrier
Smooth Fox Terrier
41 Curly-Coated Retriever
Irish Wolfhound
42 Kuvasz
Australian Shepherd
43 Saluki
Finnish Spitz
Pointer
44 Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
German Wirehaired Pointer
Black & Tan Coonhound
American Water Spaniel
45 Siberian Husky
Bichon Frise
English Toy Spaniel
46 Tibetan Spaniel
English Foxhound
Otterhound
American Foxhound
Greyhound
Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
47 West Highland White Terrier
Scottish Deerhound
48 Boxer
Great Dane
49 Dachshund
Stafforshire Bull Terrier
50 Alaskan Malamute
51 Whippet
Chinese Shar-pei
Wire Fox Terrier
52 Rhodesian Ridgeback
53 Ibizan Hound
Welsh Terrier
Irish Terrier
54 Boston Terrier
Akita

Ranks 55 to 69
Fair Working/Obedience Intelligence

Understanding of New Commands: 40 to 80 repetitions.

Obey First Command: 30% of the time or better.

Rank Breed
55 Skye Terrier
56 Norfolk Terrier
Sealyham Terrier
57 Pug
58 French Bulldog
59 Brussels Griffon
Maltese
60 Italian Greyhound
61 Chinese Crested
62 Dandie Dinmont Terrier
Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen
Tibetan Terrier
Japanese Chin
Lakeland Terrier
63 Old English Sheepdog
64 Great Pyrenees
65 Scottish Terrier
Saint Bernard
66 Bull Terrier
67 Chihuahua
68 Lhasa Apso
69 Bullmastiff

Ranks 70 to 79
Lowest Degree of Working/Obedience Intelligence


Understanding of New Commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more.

Obey First Command: 25% of the time or worse.

Rank Breed
70 Shih Tzu
71 Basset Hound
72 Mastiff
Beagle
73 Pekingese
74 Bloodhound
75 Borzoi
76 Chow Chow
77 Bulldog
78 Basenji
79 Afghan Hound

technodoll
December 6th, 2006, 03:29 PM
oh man that is sooo controversial and IMO it's full of BS! :eek: Dog intelligence is measured on a number of things and not just "learning and obeying a command", also how many dogs of X breeds did they test? what were the learning conditions? you would need 100 representatives of each breed, of both sexes and all the same age, trained by the same person in the same way in the same conditions, to arrive at "percentages" like displayed below. it's just nonsense to "rank breeds" imo.

For ex: My akitas learn things in two or three repetitions, sometimes only one. they obey almost all the time and are a breed known for their high intelligence and problem-solving skills. BUT in general they don't like to perform repetitive tasks or to work for man (they work for themselves) so you won't see many with Tracking or Working titles, even if they are perfectly able to achieve Top Status, people just choose breeds that are easier to work with. that does not determine intelligence, just human preference. :pawprint:

technodoll
December 6th, 2006, 03:35 PM
on measuring your dog's intelligence: http://www.healthyfoodforpets.com/canine-intelligence.htm

Einstein or Stooge: Measuring Canine Intelligence

It’s only natural for us to look for signs of intelligence in our dogs. Heck, even doggies that aren’t that bright occasionally display shards of brilliance in their everyday behavior, whether it’s darting out of the path of a falling pot or smiling at the faraway music of the ice-cream truck.
It’s only natural for us to look for things in our pets that we look for in our children or in each other: a keen mind, a sense of humor, loyalty and compassion. But let’s face it; the attribute we tend to brag about most is our dog’s level of intelligence.

There is no one type of canine intelligence. According to Stanley Coren, author of The Intelligence of Dogs, there are three major types of dog intelligence that can be measured by canine IQ tests:

Adaptive Intelligence

This pertains to learning and problem solving ability, relating to the knowledge and skills a dog can acquire during its time here on earth. It also relates to how long it takes for your dog to learn new relationships.

For example, if your dog recognizes guests after just one or two visits, this speaks to its adaptive intelligence. You can also look at how well your dog understands the laws of cause and effect strictly by observation. For instance, if your dog learns to use the remote control to watch his favorite program on Animal Planet, then his adaptive intelligence is off the charts!

Intelligence

This deals with behaviors and skills programmed into the animal's genetic code. For example, Sheep dogs and Border Collies are exquisite herding dogs. This is an innate quality that these breeds possess and has little to do with training, though some refinement of skills is necessary.

Working/Obedience Intelligence

This has to do with how well an animal can follow commands. This type of intelligence is largely dependant on the breed of the animal. Two perfect examples are the dogs used for guiding the blind and for K9 police work.

In addition, there is also environmental learning, language comprehension, social learning and task learning. There's also short-term memory and long-term memory. Our point? There's nothing clear-cut about intelligence. However, scientists are still trying to find ways to quantify the intelligence of man's best friends.

Testing Your Dog's **Brain Power**

Interested in some easy, ways to gauge your doggie’s brainpower? The best way to measure intelligence is to assess your dog’s problem solving skills. Furthermore, your dog’s level of persistence when trying to solve a problem should also be considered meritorious. The following are three simple tests to help measure your dog’s smarts.

Problem solving:

Take a large towel or blanket and gently toss it over your dog’s head. If he frees himself from the covering in less than 15 seconds, give him 3 points. If it takes 15-30 seconds, 2 points. If it takes him longer than 30 seconds,
give him 1 point.

Memory test:

Place a treat under one of three buckets that are lined up in a neat row. Make sure your dog sees which bucket the treat or toy is under. Turn the dog away for 10 seconds then let the dog go. If she goes straight to the
bucket with the treat under it, give her three points. If it takes two tries to find the treat, then 2 points. If she checks the wrong two first before finding the right one, give her one point.

Problem solving:

Place a treat in a square of aluminum foil and fold it twice to seal it. If your dog uses his paws to open the foil, give him 3
points. If he uses his mouth and paws to open the foil, give him 2 points. If he can’t get the foil open and starts playing with it, give him 1 point. This test, again, measures problem solving.

If your dog scores 6 points or higher, then you have a canine Einstein on your hands; 4-5 points then he or she is average; 3 points or less, well…whoever said that intelligence was a prerequisite for love?


Two More ##Fun Tests##

Here are two more fun tests. See? There are plenty of fun ways to get those brains churning! After you get the gist of ours, you can probably think up some of your own ingenious tests!

Memory/Adaptive Intelligence:

When your dog is nowhere in sight, rearrange the furniture. If your dog goes directly to his favorite spot on the couch where he likes to sit and watch his favorite shows, give him 3 points. If he investigates the room and finds his favorite spot within 30 seconds, give him 2 points. If he settles for a less comfortable place, out of laziness or sheer confusion, give him 1 point.

Adaptive Intelligence:

At a time of the day you don’t normally walk your dog, quietly pick up your keys and his leash when you know he’s watching. If he starts wagging his tail and gets excited, 3 points. If you have to walk to the door before he knows what’s going on, 2 points. If he sits there with a dumbfounded look, give him 1 point.

*Bonus: If your dog lets YOU know it’s time to go to the bathroom by bringing you his own leash (without being formally trained to do so) or has mastered the toilet, don’t worry…your dog’s a genius!

we3beagles
December 6th, 2006, 03:45 PM
Okay, so beagles score very low, but my dogs, while they might not bring me their leash, scratch at the door when they need to go out which means they are very smart? I think those charts are absolute crap. Bugsey lets me know when it is 10pm every night. He gets off the couch and sits at the bottom of the stairs like "Hello, It's bed time". On the other hand my ex-foster Bailey, who I just saw last night, can sit and that is about it despite months of obedience training. It really depends on the dog. Plus, secretly I think that well trained dogs are just that and may or may not be that smart. A smart dog can outwit, outlast and outplay. For a dog to surprise me takes a lot, but I sure can respect a dog that does.:D

Prin
December 6th, 2006, 03:46 PM
IMO, it doesn't matter what the peeps say, every dog is different. My dogs are smart, IMO, and I don't really have a problem getting them to understand me when I need them to.:cloud9:

~michelle~
December 6th, 2006, 03:51 PM
i have huskys X that can be very hard to train, but its because they dont always see a purpose. however when we train them and make it fun or witha purpose (ie the door doesnt open until you sit, therefore longer till we go for a walk) but when they get loose.... they will not listen to the come command.... they would rather run, and treats arent enticing enough to comeback...so its not intellegence but your dogs motivation factors.
Aiden l(husky x) loves to run and have his own space, so listening at the dog park is not a strong quality in him but when at home hes a cuddle bug and will do everything for a pat on the head. and he learns fast....
.braxton (brittany) however wants to please me so he listens all the time to the best of his ability, but he is not so smart so teaching him commands takes forever!! (i dont mean to sound mean about my pup, i love him, he means the world but he is not the brightest.... well mostly ts his past and making him go in to anyposition (ie laydown, sit) is really intimidating to him and scares the crap outta him. logan(husky X) is much better than he used to be, but he is stubborn and will constantly test your limits at all times before he does anything. we have to be consistant with him at all times. so they all are smart in their own way but they hate repetition and things that arent fun or purposeful

~michelle~
December 6th, 2006, 03:55 PM
oh i also use to have a lasha apso, which didnt rank very high, but would respond to my mom putting hairspray in her hair (meant my mom was going out, so she would go and sit in her crate, shewould do the same if someone grabbed the car keys) she would also run to my moms bed when it was bedtime, and would learn very quickly all of the commands we taught her.... and she was very quick to pick up on environmental cues (like above)

Golden Girls
December 6th, 2006, 04:14 PM
Exactly. Mine dont bring me their leashes either but they can tell time :) When it's park time they just stare at me until they see me packing the bag. They might not be the smartest on that list but they sure got me trained ;)

Hunter's_owner
December 6th, 2006, 04:56 PM
i have huskys X that can be very hard to train, but its because they dont always see a purpose. however when we train them and make it fun or witha purpose (ie the door doesnt open until you sit, therefore longer till we go for a walk) but when they get loose.... they will not listen to the come command.... they would rather run, and treats arent enticing enough to comeback...so its not intellegence but your dogs motivation factors.


I agree with this 100%. Sometimes I think that Cassie is sooo dumb:o :rolleyes: but then when it comes down to it, she understands, she just don't listen all the time. You can see her looking at you like "Why would I want to do that". WHereas Hunter will do just about anything you ask. If a treat is involved, there is no getting away from Cassie, she will do anything you ask...
You can tell Cassie is not going to do something if she just don't want to. I guess it is the beagle stubborness trait in her:shrug:

Lissa
December 6th, 2006, 04:57 PM
I have to agree that the chart really doesn't prove or disprove anything.

That is Stanley Coren's data based on WORKING and OBEDIENCE intelligence ONLY and he fully admits it has its holes... he compiled that data from competitive obedience results and judges who are likely to see 1000's of poodles and less than half a dozen Foxhounds in the ring over a year - obviously that alone skews the results BIG TIME.

Dodger's breed ranks 46th on that list...but he will retrieve any object (by name or if I send him to get one he doesn't know) and that has turned into a great command because he brings me litter; he can untangle himself when I deliberately wrap his leash around a pole, he knows at least 100 commands (that he will do with 1 command only), he's training in agility, flyball, competitive OB, skijoring, weight pulling and we start carting soon:fingerscr.... Ironically when we went through tracking, he had no interest. Obviously this is where the personality factor, trainer and TYPE of training comes into play. But I certainly do not believe that he is the only hound with this potential!
It's also my opinion that a dog's ability to generalize and problem solve plays a role... Example of generalization - Dodger was trained to weave a set of 12 PVC weave poles...but I've recently found out that he will weave trees, steel bars, garbage cans and pylons - so he understands the concept of weaving and applies it! My example of problem solving is like Coren's last intelligence test - it requires Dodger to move away from what he wants. If I climb over a fence, Dodger knows he has to go and find an opening to get to me - it can be 10 feet away or hundreds of feet away - Dodger will find it and get to me as fast as he can run (there's no whining or sitting their waiting for me to climb back over or show him where the opening is).

~michelle~
December 6th, 2006, 05:00 PM
wow lissa, dodger is uber smart..... he can have his own category under #1 super duper smart hound.... none of my dogs would do anyof that.... unless they were following a squirrel

we3beagles
December 6th, 2006, 05:23 PM
I agree with this 100%. Sometimes I think that Cassie is sooo dumb:o :rolleyes: but then when it comes down to it, she understands, she just don't listen all the time. You can see her looking at you like "Why would I want to do that". WHereas Hunter will do just about anything you ask. If a treat is involved, there is no getting away from Cassie, she will do anything you ask...
You can tell Cassie is not going to do something if she just don't want to. I guess it is the beagle stubborness trait in her:shrug:

lol exactly...Hubby says they'll do your taxes if you have a treat.

Hunter's_owner
December 6th, 2006, 05:26 PM
Yes, and that is a really good way of putting it, lol:D

It isn't the lack of intelligence, you just have to make it worth their while...maybe that means they are smarter than most:rolleyes:

Frenchy
December 6th, 2006, 06:58 PM
Goldens are fourth so I'm sticking to the list :p kidding, I really think it depends on each and every dog. :shrug:

jessi76
December 6th, 2006, 07:32 PM
lol... basenji is 2nd to last.

from the info TD posted...
Working/Obedience Intelligence
This has to do with how well an animal can follow commands.

whoever wrote that list does't understand the basenji, they are not a breed that follows commands. They CAN follow commands, and can do it very well, if it's in their best interest.

Frankly, I think the basenji is too smart. I find myself needing to outsmart Tucker on a daily basis, and some days it's actually HARD to outsmart him.

Hunter's_owner
December 6th, 2006, 08:15 PM
Yeah I think there is a fine line between desire to please the "top dog" and willing to do something only if it is in their best interest.

So if intelligence is measured in how "smart" they are in learning to do something only for treats, or whatever they feel is in their best interest, then Cassie is very intelligent. ;)

But if intelligence is measured in how quick they catch on, how good they are at following commands, then Hunter is very intelligent, but Cassie is not at all:shrug:

Hunter has a strong desire to please, whereas Cassie could care less:o

dogcatharmony
December 6th, 2006, 09:33 PM
i really don't care on where my dog scores on "intelligence". In my eyes she is smart. She knows how to sit, stay and most importantly come. I promised never to teach her "tricks" such as shake a paw, play dead.......in my eyes these are for entertainment and my dog is not a circus animal. If anything my dog has taught me how to be smarter.....she has taught me unconditional love and she does that just being her.

joeysmama
December 7th, 2006, 04:20 PM
We didn't make ANY of the lists, but Cooper obeys "Get your quack quack" the first time--every time !! Now someone try to tell me my baby isn't smart !:dog:

joeysmama
December 7th, 2006, 04:22 PM
Oh and how about this? My daughter is away at school but if I say "Where's Katie?" he immediately looks from the front door to her bedroom door to see if she's come home.

Hunter's_owner
December 7th, 2006, 07:01 PM
Oh and how about this? My daughter is away at school but if I say "Where's Katie?" he immediately looks from the front door to her bedroom door to see if she's come home.

I know Hunter does this as well. I love it:cloud9: He doesn't know everybody's name that he is around a lot, but he knows me, my bf and my brother 100% of the time.

HunterXHunter
December 7th, 2006, 07:57 PM
Hunter is 4th...when there's food and 79th when there isn't :frustrated:

mafiaprincess
December 8th, 2006, 12:03 AM
lol... basenji is 2nd to last.

from the info TD posted...
Working/Obedience Intelligence
This has to do with how well an animal can follow commands.

whoever wrote that list does't understand the basenji, they are not a breed that follows commands. They CAN follow commands, and can do it very well, if it's in their best interest.

Frankly, I think the basenji is too smart. I find myself needing to outsmart Tucker on a daily basis, and some days it's actually HARD to outsmart him.

Same with Afghans being last. They are highly intelligent, most problem solve like mad. I have a breeder who is a friend. They open babygates, crates, gate latches, Figure out how as a group to help each other get things down from higher places.

They all know commands, but they aren't a breed that lives to please you. Which is why on average they don't excel at Ob comps, or agility. They also get bored of repetition. She has a pup though that is the odd one out and might make an agility dog in future.

technodoll
December 8th, 2006, 08:43 AM
:cloud9: i love afghans! and it is such a pity that these "lists" float around, they cause breeds to be falsely labeled (oh i want a border collie cuz they're smart... 1 year later... oh my dog is dumb so i dumped it at the shelter: UNFAIR expectations!! it's what you put INTO the dog and how much you understand their personalities and learning curves!) :frustrated:

meb999
December 8th, 2006, 08:54 AM
Buster ranks in at 48....but I agree with what everyone has said - -it depends in the individual dog.
My dad has a Springer Spaniel and he's as sweet as it gets, but not real bright :D even though the breed ranks in at 18 :shrug:
Every one will think their dog is the smartest ;) But in reality, Buster is the smartest!