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gassy elderly dog..

amyk
November 13th, 2006, 12:59 PM
our 11 yr old lab/gsd mix is getting extremely gassy. i cant stand to even be in the same room as him. we've tried different enzymes and probiotics. a few months ago (or up to 6 months ago) i switched him to kirkland brand dog food from costco. the gas cleared up nicely, but it's back again. and worse than ever :mad:

could this be some sort of health issue?? what would be the likely problem?

slightly ot: he's around 11 years old, and since he's a large breed, he might not have a lot of time left. how does it work with euthanizing? like i dont want to wait til he's in REALLY rough shape before having him pts (i think that's mean). do i have to wait til my vet suggest having him pts?

~Amy

Prin
November 13th, 2006, 02:33 PM
Umm.. I don't completely understand your euthanizing question... Usually, when the dog's quality of life deteriorates, then you consider euthanasia. But yes, your vet, if he's a good one, will probably bring it up when the time is getting closer.

Eleven's not super old though.

Maybe he needs a better quality food. Kirkland isn't the best. There are way better foods out there. Check out the food section here for some suggestions.

amyk
November 13th, 2006, 02:48 PM
he's been on evo, ca natural, solid gold, wellness, etc. kirkland was the only food that helped with his gas ('til now). it just seems that his system is malfunctioning.

~Amy

Prin
November 13th, 2006, 03:08 PM
Have you seen a holistic vet? They might be the best in this case.

How often are you feeding? More meals spaced out can cut down on gas, as can not drinking or exercising after eating.

amyk
November 13th, 2006, 03:36 PM
thanks. we havent seen a holistic vet.. maybe that is something to look into. im really skeptical of natural medicine though.

he gets 3 meals a day.

~Amy

Prin
November 13th, 2006, 03:39 PM
A good holistic vet (in my opinion) balances both worlds...:shrug:

~michelle~
November 13th, 2006, 03:49 PM
have you tried on elevated feeder? sometimes the less they bend down the less air they swallow and the less gas they have. have a walk after meals the exercise will assist the digestion and will have him release the gas outside. ive also heard lower protien foods can help the smell

Prin
November 13th, 2006, 04:12 PM
Actually, they're saying it's the opposite now, and that elevated feeders actually are more likely to cause bloat than bowls that are not raised.:shrug:

~michelle~
November 13th, 2006, 04:26 PM
really? oh i hate when there are 50 studies that say differnt things. ill look in to that more. it seemed to make sense that elevated feeders would reduce amount of air swallowed but i guess dogs in the wild wouldnt be eating on an elevated level......

jesse's mommy
November 13th, 2006, 07:29 PM
Isn't three meals kind of a lot? Jesse only gets fed twice -- once in the morning and once at night. :shrug:

meb999
November 13th, 2006, 07:39 PM
:confused: you wanna have your pet put down because he's gassy? :confused:

yogurt can help with gassiness. Just a teaspoon added to his meals can work wonders :thumbs up

Hunter's_owner
November 13th, 2006, 07:43 PM
11 is not that old for a dog....I had a dog growing up that lived to be 16.

Hopefully your dog will have many happy healthy (gas free, lol) years left;)

amyk
November 13th, 2006, 08:16 PM
you wanna have your pet put down because he's gassy?
where did i say that? :confused: im not going to have him pts in his current condition (he still has quality of life).

did anyone read 'marley and me', is it just me, or should marley have been pts a good 6 months or so prior to when he was actually pts? he seemed to have been suffering for a long time.

also, i've never had a pet pts before. but my cousin was telling me that she had an old rabbit that was dying of cancer. she asked the vet to have it pts. he said refused because there was some more testing/treatment or what not that COULD be done. she couldnt afford the expensive vet care and in the end the rabbit died naturally. is this the norm with vets?

yogurt can help with gassiness. Just a teaspoon added to his meals can work wonders
we've tried yogurt and it caused loose stools. and instead i give him probiotics (which are in yogurt) and they dont seem to be working.

Isn't three meals kind of a lot?
i dont think so. he gets three smaller meals instead of two larger meals.

his age of 11 is just an estimate. he could be older or younger. we adopted him 2 yrs ago.


Hopefully your dog will have many happy healthy (gas free, lol) years left
thanks. i hope i can find something that helps. :fingerscr he must not feel good with all that gas. and between his constant gas and waking me up in the middle of the night every night, im not a happy camper either.

thanks for the advice!

~Amy

meb999
November 13th, 2006, 09:04 PM
sorry :o it's just that you'Re talking about having a gassy dog and having your dog pts in the same post....

I know probiotics are in yogurt...it's just the natural form sometimes works better :shrug:

You should check out our food forum, maybe you should try a different food :shrug:

OntarioGreys
November 13th, 2006, 09:25 PM
really? oh i hate when there are 50 studies that say differnt things. ill look in to that more. it seemed to make sense that elevated feeders would reduce amount of air swallowed but i guess dogs in the wild wouldnt be eating on an elevated level......


A wild dog typically lays down to eat, so the same idea of a dish being elevated.


The studies no not say they cause bloat, just that it was a factor in dogs that bloated. Being a factor or a contributing cause is 2 very different things THe studies are going to vary due to how many dogs in the study were eating out of a raised feeder at the time they bloated, if 50 of the dogs in the study of a thousand bloat cases were eating out of a raised feeder the number will be low but if 750 of them were eating out of raised feeder of the 1000 bloated the number would be high it could be something totally unrelated to the raised feeder that caused the bloat but for the studies sake they include all factors that surrouded the case, incase a trend is found and that is why the results of studies vary from one to another, being there are wide swings frim one study to another does suggest that it is not a "contributing factor"


THe problem lies with others who try to read and interpret the studies numbers and be reading one study alone will jump to conclusions and will claim a certain factor to be a cause, which is not what the study states or how it was meant to read. THe problem with many of the studies was that the research is compiled on dogs that have already bloated they were not controlled studies were all ate the exact same food with the same exercise and in the same conditions with half the group eating only out a raised feeder and the other half eating in bowls off the ground. In order to have a study like this you could not being using individuals pets owned by different people, it would require a large number of lab animals all in the same setting, eating the exact same food and treat recieving the same level of exercise preferably all for the same genetic lines so there are no other factors involved to cause errors in the research, then it would be easy to determine what is causing bloat, with the studies being doine as they are all they can do is list situations that where common during the bloat incidences and compare different research studies to see if something stands out, which is something Perdue noted when trying different foods and noted fat high on the list of ingredient seemed to be occuring quite often in the dogs they were testing, they were not looking specifically at fat, it just they noted it when comparing the injredients in foods with dogs that bloated, fat alone is not like the answer since many racing huskies get feed extemely high fat diet so other factors probably have to go with it to cause bloat, much like adding other elements to sulfer to create fire.
for example
Saying fat causes bloat is sort of like saying sulfur causes fire, which it will if on a pine stick and contains phosphorus on the tip, and then struck against something. but alone or in your drinking water it is not going to ignite.

In a recent poll in another forum 81% of owners feed their adopted greyhounds from raised bowls and yet it is very rare to hear of one bloating though their body shape makes them prone. THe forum represents approx 10,000 greyhounds yet over a 5 year period approximately 6 have bloated 3 of those cases were related to an enlarged spleen and was due to torsion so 3 are due to some other cause so if raised bowl feed was causing far, far more tha 3 dogs out of 8,000 eating out of a raised feeder over a 5 year period would bloat

What they do though and what is recommended within the greyhound community is feed yogurt especially when changing to new food to help reduce gas, no running before or after meals, avoid foods that contain soy, if a dog remains gassy on a food than something in does not agree so find another food, feed at least 2 meals a day, pretty much all owners wet the kibble before feeding to make for easier swallowing.

For dogs that do not tolerate yogurt well due to the lactose acidophilus in tablet form from a health store can be a better alternative

amyk
November 14th, 2006, 01:40 PM
You should check out our food forum, maybe you should try a different food

but the food has been working fine for the last 3-6 months (i dont remember how long they've been eating it exactly).

For dogs that do not tolerate yogurt well due to the lactose acidophilus in tablet form from a health store can be a better alternative
that's what im currently giving him. we also soak his food before giving it to him.

i'll have hubby build him a elevated feeder and see if that helps. thanks.

last night buddy had diarrhea every 1-2 hours or so during the night and vomited twice. things have calmed down today though. we'll see what happens and if he gets worse i'll get him a vet appointment for tomorrow. i made him some ground beef and rice to eat. im just going to give him like 1/4 cup every few hours to see if he can keep it down. no point in over doing it.

he hasnt eaten anything unusual lately. but last week he had a half-dead little bird in his mouth. i was outside at the time and made him drop it. it doesnt look like the bird had bite marks or any blood though. the bird died after a few minutes. could that be related to buddy not feeling well?

~Amy

Prin
November 14th, 2006, 02:03 PM
Does your food have citric acid in it? If you soak a food with citric acid it causes bad, bad gas (another bloat risk).

amyk
November 14th, 2006, 05:43 PM
not sure if the food has citric in it. thanks for the advice though.

well buddy is feeling quite a bit better. no diarrhea since this morning and no vomiting. he's had 3 mini meals of rice and ground beef and is keeping it down ok. and he's had no gas today :thumbs up

one thing i did notice is that buddy's extra gas problem and this happened after opening a new bag of kirkland. maybe there's something wrong with this particular bag??? my other dog's poo is half-decent, but he has had some softies in the last 1-2 weeks (which is odd for him) and his poo has some green in it (bile im guessing).

i remember a while back Diamond food had a problem with their food and there was a recall. diamond makes kirkland so this worries me.

~Amy

Prin
November 14th, 2006, 05:49 PM
Costco is pretty good with the recalls, as far as I know. :shrug:

meb999
November 14th, 2006, 08:29 PM
If the gas is better with ground beef...then you have your answer : the problem is the food :shrug:

I've also heard that soaking kibble causes gas :shrug:

OntarioGreys
November 14th, 2006, 08:40 PM
I would not even be thinking euthanasia, especially not because of gas, if you get a diagnosis of something very serious and terminal than it is time to consider but not for something so minor. some large breeds will live to 14 years even older there was one greyhound that passed away at 20 years old.