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Dog won't chew food

H.P.
November 12th, 2006, 08:11 PM
I am not sure where this should get posted. If this is not right, please feel free to move it.

For the last week or two, Sydney has not been chewing her food, she just swallows it whole. She is eating Canidea, and the kibble is pretty small. She chews other things, he cookies, her toys, sticks, the occasional chair leg, so I don't think that her mouth is sore or that anything is wrong.

I have tried spreading her food over the floor, and puting rocks in it, it slows her down, but she just sucks the food up like a vacuum, without chewing.

Why this worries me is that she occasionally gets strangled, coughs the piece back up, only to swallow it whole again. She has also had pretty bad gas since she started this.

:confused: Any ideas on how to make her chew her food? Will she grow out of this (she is 5 months old)? Should I switch to a food with larger kibble that she has to chew?

mummummum
November 12th, 2006, 10:11 PM
A larger kibble might help. The Timberwolf kibble is very small as well and Ceili occasionally has to hack up an inhaled piece When we were at Slobberfest this summer I saw a nifty plastic (unfortunately) bowl which had 4 posts in it and was tilted. If you have a bundt pan at home you might give that a try.

technodoll
November 12th, 2006, 11:03 PM
hmmm if you fed a raw diet... you could feed really big meaty bone-in pieces that would give your dog a real workout and a challenge... no more food gulping nor choking.. unfortunately, some dogs are gulpers and nothing short of feeding them something bigger than their head will stop them :shrug: i really hope you find a solution, and good luck!

OntarioGreys
November 13th, 2006, 09:38 AM
Most dogs don't chew kibble, their teeth are designed for biting and tearing not grinding food, they don't have flattened molars like us.

For my dogs I wet the kibble not to make it soggy simply enough to act like a lubricant it makes it easier to swallow with out horking pieces of kibble up.
If this is a recent kibble change some gassiness can occur in the beginning as they adjust to the new food, and if the food agrees with them it will subside

rainbow
November 14th, 2006, 04:00 AM
When my lab was that age he was like that as well. The only way I could make him eat slower was to put his food in a bowl and transfer it one handful at a time into his dish. He still didn't chew but at least it helped to slow him down. :D

He's now 16 months old and I just put a kong in his dish which helps. ;)

Scott_B
November 14th, 2006, 06:31 AM
Yeah, my pup never chewed kibble when I fed that. I find its usually just the smaller breeds that may chew.

Hunter's_owner
November 14th, 2006, 07:34 AM
For my dogs I wet the kibble not to make it soggy simply enough to act like a lubricant it makes it easier to swallow with out horking pieces of kibble up.


This is what I do as well.

Also, I don't think putting rocks in with the food will help at all:shrug:

pug lover
November 14th, 2006, 08:12 AM
wouldn't rocks defeat the purpose to get the dog to chew:yuck:

and in long term what if one of these rocks breaks or chips a tooth:yell:

sorry i thinking preventable vet bills here:thumbs up

Hunter's_owner
November 14th, 2006, 09:51 AM
My vet told me a story about a lab who ate rocks. He was brought into the vet with some tummy problems, when the vet felt his stomach it was hard, when they did x-rays, the stomach was filled with rocks. Apparently the dog had been eating small rocks for awhile, and they just collected in the belly. So yeah, rocks can likely lead to unnecessary vet bills, and pain for your dog.

H.P.
November 14th, 2006, 12:36 PM
The rocks were big enough that she wouldn't eat them, and they did slow her down. It was a sugestion that I had read on one of the boards here. I only used it for a couple of feedings, since it did not have the desired results. Thank you for the concern though. We have used the Canidea for about 2 months, I guess maybe her belly just needs to adjust to her eating it whole.

Scott_B
November 14th, 2006, 01:50 PM
I wouldnt worry too much about it.

As for the gas, some dogs will get it more then others. If its really a problem you could try one of these :p

http://www.flat-d.com/thong.html

pug lover
November 14th, 2006, 03:11 PM
question is does it work??:shrug:

Prin
November 14th, 2006, 05:11 PM
As for the gas, some dogs will get it more then others. If its really a problem you could try one of these :p

http://www.flat-d.com/thong.htmlOh, I was so hoping that wasn't real.:(

A dog who inhales is not likely to stop when the kibble gets bigger, so IMO, it's better that it's small kibbles. She's just very food driven. What can help is a fixed eating routine and some privacy. If she is never interrupted in a meal and the meal is always given in the same place, she'll gradually eat more slowly (that's what I figured out with Jemma). If they think somebody is going to take the food away, they eat faster.

I also used to make Jemma take breaks (distract her with a cookie, again not touching her food ever, and then phase the cookie out). But that just let her breathe a bit between hooverings... The privacy and security thing worked better in the end.:shrug:

You'll just have to keep her teeth clean by other means.

mummummum
November 15th, 2006, 08:49 PM
Maybe a kong might work. I've got one where Bridie has to work at it to get kibble out either with her gi-normous tongue or by rolling the kong around.