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no-pull dog harness

technodoll
November 3rd, 2006, 12:03 PM
After obedience class last night, we asked our trainer for help on tools that would "manage" dakotah's mindless pulling while on walks. We tried everything (choke collar, prong collar, halti, to no avail, newtrix doesn't fit on his head because of the shape, etc) all combined with training and more training, of course. She suggested a sporn no-pull harness, which looks like this:

http://www.dog.com/Prod_images/p22558.jpg

She lent us the harness for a week to try it out, and so far on one little walk it works pretty well.... just wondering if it's because of the "novelty" of it all, and when he gets used to the system he'll still pull like a freight train :frustrated:

do any of you have any experience with one of these "no-pull" harnesses?... should we buy it? we are desperate to give his "naked neck" a break so the fur can grow back...

thank you! :pray:

Hunter's_owner
November 3rd, 2006, 12:17 PM
I have used one something like that for Hunter. I changed to the halti, as I find that better for both of us, but by bf would rather use that type of harness he finds it great. I think if I were a little stronger :o it would have been okay for me too:shrug:

Hopefully it continues to work well for you :fingerscr

technodoll
November 3rd, 2006, 12:23 PM
I think if I were a little stronger it would have been okay for me too

does that mean there was still pulling? :confused:

my dog weighs as much as i do, but he's a LOT stronger :frustrated: ... sigh.

pitgrrl
November 3rd, 2006, 01:06 PM
I've used a similar no-pull harness and honestly I wasn't the hugest fan, but you may not have the same problems depending on your dog.

The biggest issue was the chaffing of their "armpits", even when I added padding to reduce the friction. My two are pretty bald in that area though, so that may have been the real problem.

The second problem was that, and pleas excuse the graphic description, when they would squat to poop, it gave them just enough slack in the harness to get out. Again though, my dogs can get out of alot of harnesses and collars, so it probably wouldn't be a problem with a dog that wasn't a contortionist/escape artist.

The last issue was that although it stopped the pulling most of the time, it was no competition for their prey drive. If a squirrle of pigeon appeared, they would just ignore the discomfort and go for it. Ofcourse these are the same dogs who would jump through fire to chase something small and moving and who have done the same with every single no pull harness, halter and collar I've tried that others seem to have great success with, so obvioulsy they're "special" :o

All that said though, I know many people who swear by that harness, so don't let me totally discourage you. Also, at nearly 5 years old, my former super pullers are much, much better and haven't dragged me anywhere in a couple of years, so there is hope:D

technodoll
November 3rd, 2006, 01:14 PM
pitgrrl thanks so much for your feedback! :)

we are thinking of using this harness for "city walks" only, where most of the pulling occurs (he wants to mark eeeeeeeverything in sight :frustrated: ). the underarm chafing also worries me, even if he has furry armpits it is a sensitive spot on any dog IMO... the "sherpa" cushion sleeve travels up and down the nylon cord so we would have to sew it into place to offer any protection, and even then i'm wondering if it would be adequate?

BUT what other option do we have to give his chafed neck a break? :confused: forget any head restraints, they just don't fit his big melon and he will turn his head sideways to still pull while walking. sooo... sigh. i really hope this harness will work... if he pulls 50% less it would be a miracle and enough for us! :pray:

Hunter's_owner
November 3rd, 2006, 01:22 PM
does that mean there was still pulling? :confused:

my dog weighs as much as i do, but he's a LOT stronger :frustrated: ... sigh.

Yeah there was still some pulling...:(
I guess give it another couple of tries to see how he fares with it...I hope it works out for you, :fingerscr

technodoll
November 3rd, 2006, 01:28 PM
we'll try it this weekend and see how it goes :fingerscr i am just so out of options, it's not even funny. with my wrecked neck (herniated disk) i CANNOT be pulled around and fight with leash jerking and all :(

Hunter's_owner
November 3rd, 2006, 01:33 PM
No you are right about that. I have a herniated disk in my neck as well, so I know what you are talking about:(
Did anything happen to cause this to happen, or do you think it is from walking Dakotah???

technodoll
November 3rd, 2006, 01:38 PM
Did anything happen to cause this to happen, or do you think it is from walking Dakotah???


it's not related to walking the dogs, although all that leash pulling (a combined 190 lbs of dog) does NOT help... i'm sure if my boy knew what he was doing to me he would stop! but... :rolleyes: LOL! what about you though? how did it happen??

Hunter's_owner
November 3rd, 2006, 01:49 PM
Sorry to Thread Jack your thread:o ... I was hit by a car :eek:
it could have been a lot worse than it was, but it screwed up my neck, and now I have the herniated disk and a pinched nerve (just to add to my extensive list of health problems :frustrated: )

hazelrunpack
November 3rd, 2006, 01:59 PM
I had a 65-pound 'puller' who paid no attention to his collar--prong, chain, nothing made an impression. However, he hated to have something bump against his front legs. So I'd grasp his leash as low down toward the collar as was comfortable for me (so I could still stand fully erect), and loop the tag end of the leash around him in front. I'd slip my grasping hand through the handle loop (which was now passed over to the other side of the body) while maintaining that original grasp a few inches above the collar. This left a loop of the leash hanging in front of him to bump his front legs as he walked and it left my other hand free. It worked like a charm. I don't know how well it would work with a larger, dog, though.

I wish I had pics...It's hard to describe. But basically it looked like he had a lei draped around his neck. The gentle bumping of the leash kept him slower and if he did lunge after something, I still had the backup of having the loop of the leash around my wrist.

If you don't have a leash of the right length, maybe a length of loose leash tied to the front straps across the chest and hanging slightly down over the tops of the legs would work? Just remember to keep it short enough that he doesn't accidently get his leg through the loop.

hazelrunpack
November 3rd, 2006, 02:01 PM
Sorry to Thread Jack your thread:o ... I was hit by a car :eek:
it could have been a lot worse than it was, but it screwed up my neck, and now I have the herniated disk and a pinched nerve (just to add to my extensive list of health problems :frustrated: )

Jeez, HO! Owee! We've got to get you a new guardian angel!!!! :angel:

Hunter's_owner
November 3rd, 2006, 02:57 PM
Yes a guardian angel would be nice. But then again...maybe I got one, because getting hit by a car usually does more damage than what happened to me :shrug:

technodoll
November 3rd, 2006, 02:58 PM
holy cow... i have nothing to complain about :eek:

you are INDEED very, very lucky :grouphug:

mafiaprincess
November 3rd, 2006, 03:33 PM
I've used a similar no-pull harness and honestly I wasn't the hugest fan, but you may not have the same problems depending on your dog.

The biggest issue was the chaffing of their "armpits", even when I added padding to reduce the friction. My two are pretty bald in that area though, so that may have been the real problem.

We tried a halti, gl, choke, prong, easy walk harness, a similar to that no pull harness, and a think a 3rd anti pull harness. A few were 'great' for the first few days because the pulling wasn't as bad as on a flat collar.. so it seemed manageable.. After like a week, I'd be like no not working..

Or she'd learn in like one walk how to outmaneuver the tool. She just pulled on that particular harness so it was as tight as possible, she was hurting herself almost cutting off circulation and still pulling. She got like rope burn...

24 pounds, but was pulling like she was twice the dog at all times.. I ended up sadly needing a prong, and had to wean her off that when pulling was no longer the 'normal' behaviour for her.

technodoll
November 3rd, 2006, 03:43 PM
i was afraid of that... the novelty will wear off and it's back to pulling :frustrated: but i have to give it a try, i'm so out of options :sad:

pitgrrl
November 3rd, 2006, 06:10 PM
Just as another idea, I now use a harness called the Vest Harness, the company name is Pet Friendly I think.
It claims to help with pulling by slightly pulling up on the front legs when they pull. I can say that it's the best harness I've used yet, it seems like the dogs feel any pressure on the the leash alot better than with anything else I've used, BUT it may be that by the time I got these harnesses a couple of years ago I might have managed to train some leash manners, so who's to say if it's truely the harness.
This is what it looks like though:
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b84/pitgrrl/basstreetsmountainstairs.jpg

PetFriendly
November 3rd, 2006, 06:11 PM
This may sound silly, but a winter of walking with dog booties on pretty much cured Charley of the pulling habit. For some reason, when we first started with the boots (for salt protection) he'd walk by my side. After a month, when the novelty of the boots had worn off (he doesn't love them exactly but he no longer hates them either), walking near me and without pulling was his new normal.

He'll still pull somewhat if there is a kid he knows will pet him, or a dog he likes, but then we can revert back to the stop-and-go-when-you-aren't-pulling technique.

MyBirdIsEvil
November 3rd, 2006, 06:40 PM
I don't think anything replaces actually training your dog to walk next to you, or making them do it, especially if they're stubborn. You have to be persistent and the dog shouldn't be allowed to move at all or go anywhere unless he's walking in that spot.

We tried everything on Walnut, halti, harness, prong collar etc., and she learned to pull on all of it. I have a harness exactly like the one in the picture and eventually she learned to pull on it and somehow eventually learned to turn around and slither her way out of the harness like a cat :rolleyes: . Your dog is a lot bigger than Walnut is at 55 lbs, and she was eventually pulling on the harness hard enough to hurt my hands.
I eventually gave up on devices and concentrated EVERY BIT of my time and energy on being consistent and training.

Now that I've learned a ton about training and stayed completely persistent I've taught her to walk behind me and not pull. Sometimes if she's hyper and hasn't had much activity lately she'll try to pull, but I curb that by teaching her that we go absolutely nowhere if she's pulling. She has to sit and stay and when I start to walk if she lunges ahead I stop and put her back into sit.
It doesn't matter what device I put on her, she knows she's supposed to walk behind me, and the device shouldn't have to do the correcting.
If she tries to go ahead of me I'll actually sometimes get in front of her and physically stop her, because if I pull back on the leash to stop her it's just teaching her to pull more.
The problem isn't that the dog pulls, that problem is dogs have a lot more patience than us, lol.

babyrocky1
November 3rd, 2006, 07:59 PM
Just as another idea, I now use a harness called the Vest Harness, the company name is Pet Friendly I think.
It claims to help with pulling by slightly pulling up on the front legs when they pull. I can say that it's the best harness I've used yet, it seems like the dogs feel any pressure on the the leash alot better than with anything else I've used, BUT it may be that by the time I got these harnesses a couple of years ago I might have managed to train some leash manners, so who's to say if it's truely the harness.
This is what it looks like though:
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b84/pitgrrl/basstreetsmountainstairs.jpgPitgrrrl, I use the Halter harness, I think its the same as the first one you described, it is the best thing Ive ever used, he can and does still pull but not nearly to the same degree, its pretty warn out so Im wondering if the ones of the pictures you posted work the same way?? Great dogs btw!

technodoll
November 3rd, 2006, 08:18 PM
The problem isn't that the dog pulls, that problem is dogs have a lot more patience than us, lol.

no kidding :frustrated: LOL

we really need to let his neck fur grow back in, it's totally worn down to the skin in a half-moon ring on the front of his neck :eek: so a harness seems like a good idea, even if he pulls, we can AND WILL work on the training though - he gets no free passes.

why am i always stuck with the stubborn dog :yell:

babyrocky1
November 3rd, 2006, 08:46 PM
[QUOTE=

She lent us the harness for a week to try it out, and so far on one little walk it works pretty well.... just wondering if it's because of the "novelty" of it all, and when he gets used to the system he'll still pull like a freight train :frustrated:

do any of you have any experience with one of these "no-pull" harnesses?... should we buy it? we are desperate to give his "naked neck" a break so the fur can grow back...

thank you! :pray:[/QUOTE]This is the one I have for Rocky and I tried EVERYTHING as well! This is what has worked best for us, I use it in combination with a two handled leash and it has been my saving grace as I had developed severe arthritis in my SI joints from our constant tug of wars LOL I did find that after a few weeks it wasnt as miraculous but still doable!

muckypup
November 3rd, 2006, 09:36 PM
I'd forget the harness and get down to some serious training. Just get it over with, the sooner you train your dog to walk nicely without pulling the much happier you'll be.

technodoll
November 3rd, 2006, 10:48 PM
muckypup... please don't assume we haven't been training this dog since the first day we got him. he is just very, very stubborn, and if you know akitas at all, you would know that :frustrated: it ain't all roses with this boy...
that being said, we went out walking tonight (1 dog per human) and dakotah walked SO much better with the harness! :highfive: even if the stupid sherpa sleeve thingies keep traveling all over the place and we have to readjust them all the time (our trainer said to sew them in place on the nylon cord). He walked with his head higher, he was a LOT more responsive to us, one slight tug on the leash and since it's all new and he's not quite sure what is going on, it's a great time to reinforce the "heel" since he's actually looking to us for direction (for a change!). it feels sooo good to finally be giving his poor neck a break! :thumbs up

pitgrrl
November 4th, 2006, 10:41 AM
Pitgrrrl, I use the Halter harness, I think its the same as the first one you described, it is the best thing Ive ever used, he can and does still pull but not nearly to the same degree, its pretty warn out so Im wondering if the ones of the pictures you posted work the same way?? Great dogs btw!

I think the harnesses in the picture offers less no-pull action than the types of harnesses that loop under the legs, but it's worked really well for my two at the training stage they were at. I think basically it gives the handler more leverage than the dog, so when they do pull it doesn't feel like 1000lbs yanking your arm out of the socket.

I'd say it's probably a good option for a dog who knows their commands, usually walks without pulling, but sometimes lunges or pulls towards something. It's also really good for dogs with bald armpits that are easily chaffed or has a sensitive neck. It also doubles as a seatbelt.

muckypup
November 4th, 2006, 05:56 PM
muckypup... please don't assume we haven't been training this dog since the first day we got him. he is just very, very stubborn, and if you know akitas at all, you would know that :frustrated: it ain't all roses with this boy...

I didnít assume you havenít been training your dog, I suggested you get serious about your training. Stubborn dogs can learn.

PetFriendly
November 4th, 2006, 08:54 PM
I didnít assume you havenít been training your dog, I suggested you get serious about your training. Stubborn dogs can learn.

Some dogs just like to pull, it makes them happy... From the very first post there was reference to needing a tool to help WHILE training. If I dog likes to pull, its rather difficult to convince it that walks are just as much fun without the pulling (remember the dog likes to pull, its built in to some dogs, i.e. sled dogs, pulling makes them happy the same way bringing back a dead duck makes some retrievers happy).

I had the very same problemw tih my little dog and it took quite qhile, and a pair of boots to help me. Yes, you train, but at the end of the day, a dog who isn't well exercised pulls more, and a dog that can't be walked because it pulls (remember, owner has physical impairments) is just going to pull more, IMHO anyway.

muckypup
November 4th, 2006, 09:07 PM
Some dogs just like to pull, it makes them happy... From the very first post there was reference to needing a tool to help WHILE training.

I know where you all are coming from. I have 2 large dogs 80 and 90lbs that I got as adults, untrained, dominate and stubborn, that pulled on the leash amongst other things, one very high prey drive and one dog aggressive.
I'm just trying to say that there are no quick fixes it takes a lot of work and there is no way of getting around it.

technodoll
November 4th, 2006, 11:44 PM
I'm just trying to say that there are no quick fixes it takes a lot of work and there is no way of getting around it.

trust me, girl... we know! :o every walk is a training lesson, it's not even fun anymore, there are no pleasant relaxed strolls ever. it's always about watching the dog, training the dog, correcting the dog, praising the dog, begging the trainer for better tricks to help us train the dog... sigh. 2.5 years later, we've gotten nowhere... because the little ***** KNOWS how to heel, he chooses NOT to! :yell:

Prin
November 4th, 2006, 11:53 PM
There might not be quick fixes, but there may be something that'll save the tendons and ligaments in your shoulders...

Too bad the newtrix doesn't work on him, because I totally understand what you mean. We've been training Boo from day 1 too. Jemma, miss lab/husky (who is supposed to be the pully one), is great on a leash (and off) after training, but we just can't seem to drill it into Boo enough. Walking wasn't peaceful at all before the newtrix. I'd get frustrated after a while so my man would take him and then I'd get mad at my man for not doing it right (when really it was just Boo being Boo, which was what got me frustrated in the first place), and then we'd turn around and go home.:o

We've tried everything with Boo and we're consistent in each of the methods we've tried, and they do work, but 30 seconds later, he's back to pulling no matter how often you correct it and how consistent you are. :shrug: Jemma gets it- why can't Boo!? :yell:

Anyway, I hope you can find something to help.

technodoll
November 4th, 2006, 11:56 PM
We've tried everything with Boo and we're consistent in each of the methods we've tried, and they do work, but 30 seconds later, he's back to pulling no matter how often you correct it and how consistent you are. Jemma gets it- why can't Boo!?

weell, you just described our situation to a "T", my dear! it's like our kids are ghost-siblings or something! :eek: :o :D

Frenchy
November 4th, 2006, 11:59 PM
Sorry but I'm glad I'm not alone . And glad to be able to walk them unleash behind my house!

Prin
November 5th, 2006, 12:00 AM
weell, you just described our situation to a "T", my dear! it's like our kids are ghost-siblings or something! :eek: :o :D

ha ha too bad they don't get along... Or maybe good that they don't- they might teach each other new techniques.:D

MyBirdIsEvil
November 5th, 2006, 12:07 AM
I'd get frustrated after a while so my man would take him and then I'd get mad at my man for not doing it right (when really it was just Boo being Boo, which was what got me frustrated in the first place), and then we'd turn around and go home.

LOL, I have that problem. Sometimes when I'm frustrated at Walnut and I hand her to my b/f I get frustrated at him 'cause it feels like I'm having to train him AND Walnut.

He's a large guy and she can be pulling sometimes and he won't notice and I'm like "nOOO!!! Now she thinks she can pull!!" grrr. It seems like now that he's actually taking my advice though she's having a lot less relapses.

we've gotten nowhere... because the little ***** KNOWS how to heel, he chooses NOT to!

Sounds like a reinforcement problem. That's the problem with working breed dogs, they're bred to deal with discomfort and never complain, so when it comes to correcting them they've already forgotten about it a couple seconds later. They can also pull for hours, which doesn't help :frustrated: .
I'm thinking I should trade Walnut in for another collie (j/k). My collie listens so well though, and sometimes after taking him for a walk I look at Walnut and go "You suck!", lol. Unfortunately though, I love the big stubborn working breed dogs, so I'll probably end up with more. I guess I like a challenge.

Prin
November 5th, 2006, 12:08 AM
Ok, so this is the problem:
Sounds like a reinforcement problem. That's the problem with working breed dogs, they're bred to deal with discomfort and never complain, so when it comes to correcting them they've already forgotten about it a couple seconds later. But what's the solution?:o

Frenchy
November 5th, 2006, 12:11 AM
I'm thinking I should trade Walnut in for another collie (j/k). My collie listens so well though, and sometimes after taking him for a walk I look at Walnut and go "You suck!", lol.

I sometimes tell my boys I will put them on petfinder :eek: :D NEVER !

MyBirdIsEvil
November 5th, 2006, 12:15 AM
Ok, so this is the problem:
But what's the solution?:o

Feel free to tell me when you find out :frustrated: .

I don't think there's one solution for any one dog. There's several training tips I've tried on Walnut that she just doesn't care about at all, I just had to get to know her and figure out what worked for her.:shrug:

Prin
November 5th, 2006, 12:15 AM
lol Frenchy, it's much faster to just yell "S-P-C-A!" :D

Frenchy
November 5th, 2006, 12:19 AM
What about prong collars ? I would never try any type of torture on my dogs,never, but do they even work ?

Prin
November 5th, 2006, 12:20 AM
I haven't tried it because when we picked one up in the store, Boo hit the floor and started puking...:o

Frenchy
November 5th, 2006, 12:25 AM
Boo hit the floor and started puking...:o

Smart boy :thumbs up I must say I'm not always 'the respect ma authoritay' with the dogs :o sometimes I just go ; no no , mommy doesn't like it when you don't listen :rolleyes: works real well :rolleyes: a coworker told me last week ; you have such a big heart with dogs , I don't get it why people call you a b**** ! :D Thanks !

Prin
November 5th, 2006, 12:28 AM
Your coworkers need some more tact...:D

Oh and Boo knows "LISSSTEN!!!" very well.:D

MyBirdIsEvil
November 5th, 2006, 12:28 AM
What about prong collars ? I would never try any type of torture on my mean by dogs,never, but do they even work ?
It depends on what you mean by work.
With a very hard headed dog they may walk nice on a prong collar but it won't matter once you put the flat collar on.
In Walnut's case she'll pull really hard on her prong collar too if there's something she wants to get at.
They're useful if you need to physically correct a dog for something but that's about it, IMO. I don't even use one on Walnut anymore, I realized it wasn't teaching her anything.
I think one of the biggest reasons to use them is lack of patience. If your dog is smart they're going to realize they must listen on the prong but not off of it, just like any other device - I think a device is a bad thing to rely on for training in general.

Frenchy
November 5th, 2006, 12:32 AM
Your coworkers need some more tact...:D



:offtopic: I don't have any at work so I don't mind if they don't either ! Depends who.

mummummum
November 5th, 2006, 07:35 PM
I don't know alot about harnesses TD but I wonder if this is something that might meet your needs at least while training. I've never seen one in action mind you.

http://www.bullseyegraphics.com.au/no-pull/no_pull_concept.html

mummummum
November 5th, 2006, 07:37 PM
One other thought : about the sherpa sleeves ~ you might want to use velcro rather than sew them directly onto a harness as I'll bet you will want to run them through the washing machine every so often.

MyBirdIsEvil
November 5th, 2006, 07:43 PM
That looks like it would prevent pulling, but I think it might be dangerous if the dog ever lunges.

technodoll
November 5th, 2006, 08:23 PM
I don't know alot about harnesses TD but I wonder if this is something that might meet your needs at least while training. I've never seen one in action mind you.

http://www.bullseyegraphics.com.au/n...l_concept.html

i'd be too afraid of causing a cruciate tear... akitas are notorious for blowing their knees :eek: i appreciate you looking for solutions for us! :o

Esaunders
November 5th, 2006, 08:59 PM
Hey Techno...

Have you tried using a half-hitch? Its a technique that I learned from some setter people that is often used on field dogs that pull.

There are 2 variants off of the same principle. You need an extra long leash either way
- Attach the leash to the collar, loop the leash under the chest behind the elbows then loop the leash in a half hitch over the shoulders. A clip can be tied into the leash for easy fastening. Pulling on the collar also will cause pressure behind elbows under the chest

Or
-Attach the leash to the collar, loop the leash abdomen in front of the stifle then loop the leash in a half hitch over the hips. A clip can be tied into the leash for easy fastening. Pulling on the collar also will cause pressure into the area in front of the stifle.

I suspect the second method would be the more effective one.

It's worth a try and probably won't cost you anything.
-

PetFriendly
November 5th, 2006, 09:47 PM
I like the 'step in harness', if you keep the chest strap on the shorter side, it should help the fur grow back anyway.

There's also the gentle leader easy walk (or any harness that has the leash ring on the dog's chest). If used properly, with lots of praise, it can work well to teach the dog that it likes walking by your side :( (and help with the hair issue). You'd need two harnesses though, because this one isn't very well suited to horsing around or inattention.

rainbow
November 5th, 2006, 10:34 PM
Too bad the newtrix doesn't work on him, because I totally understand what you mean. We've been training Boo from day 1 too. Jemma, miss lab/husky (who is supposed to be the pully one), is great on a leash (and off) after training, but we just can't seem to drill it into Boo enough. Walking wasn't peaceful at all before the newtrix. I'd get frustrated after a while so my man would take him and then I'd get mad at my man for not doing it right (when really it was just Boo being Boo, which was what got me frustrated in the first place), and then we'd turn around and go home.:o

We've tried everything with Boo and we're consistent in each of the methods we've tried, and they do work, but 30 seconds later, he's back to pulling no matter how often you correct it and how consistent you are. :shrug: Jemma gets it- why can't Boo!? :yell:


I can soooo relate to that. My husky I could walk by himself, with no problem whatsoever, but my lab is a completely different story. :eek:

Unfortuneately, I have to walk them both at the same time 90% of the time, so it's really hard to focus the training on the lab. :frustrated:

speedbunny70
November 8th, 2006, 03:58 PM
The Dog Whisperer, Cesar Milan has just designed a new collar called "The Illusion Collar" http://cesarmillan.securesites.net/index.php?cPath=76
There is a demonstration on this site and it seems to work.

Prin
November 8th, 2006, 04:03 PM
hmm... The demonstration video is pretty crap. I mean the idea seems ok, but in the video, the dog is still pulling (she walks faster and faster to hide it though), and her corrections aren't consistent at all... But whatever... It's another tool, I guess.:shrug:

Dogastrophe
November 8th, 2006, 04:26 PM
I have used a head halter for Lucy which works great in the pulling department, however she hates having it on (I think it bothers the sides of her mouth). A few weeks ago I picked up a choke chain and have, so far, been happy with it. She has yet to pull against it. I think that it has more to do with the sound that it makes when she's walking than it does with the pinching aspect. The little clink clink clink of the chain rubbing against itself seems to distract her.