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Newborn Kittens with Fleas.

Widdi
October 28th, 2006, 09:08 PM
A few weeks ago my idiot of a neighbour moved out of town and abandonned his 3 year old cat on the street. I have known the cat from birth (she was a kitten of my old Queen who passed away recently) so when I saw her in my backyard last night I brought her into my house. She was very visably pregnant, but didn't show signs of fleas. Well during the night she gave birth and while I was examining the kittens a few minutes ago I discovered that they are infested with fleas.

I have never had kittens with fleas before, and I am very concerned for the well being of the kittens. Unfortunetly I won't be able to see a vet anytime soon (my small towns one and only is gone away for two weeks) and I need to know what I can do to rid the little darlings of the fleas. I've read a few things on the internet, but am hesitant to try them without consulting a vet, so I am hoping for a response from one, or from someone who has worked with one before.

Any help is very appreciated.

jawert1
October 28th, 2006, 09:11 PM
I've used the gooseneck lamp over a dish of water with some good smelling dish soap in it overnight trick to success for both dogs and cats, but never newborn kittens. Is there an emergency vet you could contact either in your town or the nearest one? Good luck, I hope all goes well for the kitty and her babies

Widdi
October 28th, 2006, 09:17 PM
I've attempted to get a hold of the vet's assistant, but without any success. Other than that there is no one and the nearest city is almost two hours away. A long time for the kittens to spend in a cold car.

Thanks for your well wishes. I'm hoping everything works out.

Paula69
October 28th, 2006, 09:18 PM
Hi, oh, that's too bad! I went through fleas recently w/ a stray dog! And I have 2 dogs, cat, turtle, fish! Quite the ordeal! Get ahold of it soon, cuz they'll get everywhere then U gotta do all bedding, etc..I ended up having to fumigate house, bombed it w/ can of Raid for fleas, that worked, but have to leave the house for one hour, I would say give the cat a cat flea spray or collar at least, that worked for my cat, but what if she won't accept the babies after a scent change if they were to be sprayed, my cat knew it helped him though...but it probably wouldn't be too safe for newborns? I have no idea? Hope a vet can help you!? Congrats on your unplanned birth! Thanx for bringing kitty in so babies didin't die outside!:cat: :ca:

jawert1
October 28th, 2006, 09:19 PM
Perhaps a wipe down with a warm towel, and then move all of them to clean bedding elsewhere in the house? I'm so sorry I can't be of more help :sad:

jesse's mommy
October 28th, 2006, 09:22 PM
I wouldn't give mommy a flea bath or a collar. There are a lot of chemicals in there that could harm the kittens. Obviously the best thing to do is to get a hold of a vet, but if there isn't one near there's not much to do.

I would think if you keep changing the bedding and wiping the area down with warm water might help and wouldn't change the scent at all. Otherwise I'm sure a rescue person will be on here soon who has been through this. Just hang in there and thank you for saving mommy and her babies.

mafiaprincess
October 28th, 2006, 09:24 PM
Flea products aren't for use on animals under 6 or 8 weeks depending upon the label.. and even then many of the products are terrible like Hartz made ones.

Widdi
October 28th, 2006, 09:27 PM
Trust me, I know better than to use any type of flea products on mommy or the babies.

Ill try the water bowl and dishsoap treatment, it may at least get rid of some of them off mommy to stop them from jumping onto the babies.

Prin
October 28th, 2006, 09:29 PM
Good luck! :) :fingerscr

Paula69
October 28th, 2006, 09:29 PM
Bummer, well, didn't think that'd be safe, hope ya get some vet advice, but just getting them off for now should be a big help ya, mom might appreciate and understand the help hopefully, mommy kittys are best left alone for now, crucial bonding time, good luck!

jawert1
October 28th, 2006, 09:32 PM
uhhhh Paula, did you read Widdi's first post all the way through? I suspect from the information clearly stated that this isn't the first litter they've gone through.

badger
October 28th, 2006, 09:34 PM
You are very kind to bring this poor cat inside. A pox on your ex-neighbour, how could he.

This is all I could find, from quite a good site:

Question: Dear Dr.Mike,

Both our kittens have a pretty severe flea problem. I would like to use some type of flea product on them but everything I have read states "do not use on kittens under 12 weeks of age". We are not really sure just how old the
kittens are but we do know they were born sometime in October,2000.
Is there any of the "Control or Advantage" type products available for
kittens of this age?

It has been suggested that we use the commercial dishwashing detergent
Dawn for flea bathing. Are you familiar with this practice and if so, do you
reccommend it? In the meantime we are using Kitten shampoo but I am not too confident in the flea-killing properties of most of the kitten shampoos available.

Thank You for your assistance.
Cordially, Larry

Answer: Larry-

I think that Frontline Topspot Plus (tm) is approved for kittens 8 weeks of
age. It is a good flea control product. Frontline is usually available only through veterinarians, so check with your vet to see if he or she uses this product. If not, my guess is that they have a method for dealing with fleas on young kittens that they can help you implement.

Dishwashing detergent will kill adult fleas if the lather is left on
kittens for ten minutes or so, but it is a very inefficient flea killer and
it can cause drying of the skin. Flea and tick shampoos work well to kill
fleas that are on the kitten at the time the shampoo is applied but have no
residual effect, so it is hard to eliminate fleas with these products, too.
UNQUOTE

Personally, I would try to stay away from chemicals for now, including those OTC collars for the mother, at least until you have talked to a vet. Can you wet the kittens with a damp cloth and then comb out the fleas? I know it doesn't take care of the eggs but if you did it a couple of times a day, it might give them some relief. Wash their bedding daily in hot water (thank god for old towels) and keep mother and babies confined in one place so they don't carry them around the house. Vaccuum vigourously.

This is something I have not had to deal with, poor you.

Widdi
October 28th, 2006, 09:46 PM
I'll be going to pick up a flea comb first thing tomorrow morning. Hopefully the people at the pet store will have some advice on the situation.

robinstout
October 29th, 2006, 10:30 PM
I had the same problem just a few weeks ago. My vet gave me something for kittens under age. It's called Adams. But you dont spray it directly and all over the babies. Spray it on your fingers and rub it on the arm pits and around ears and bottom and feet. He said anywhere you see the flea dirt (poop). I would just try to rub where you see the fleas but not too much at one time. It is a very mild flea med so you may have to apply every few days, but it does help. Good luck!

Maya
October 29th, 2006, 11:37 PM
Hi Widdi,

This may sound a little too gross for you but when I was a kid long story short I found picking the fleas out (may need small hands) and drowning them in dish soap and H20 worked to keep the population down, losing battle of course but temp. solution. I tried the flea comb on my adult kitty some years ago without much luck, it may take a little practice. If you do wipe the babies with just warm water, I would avoid soap because even most dish soaps including dawn are going to add unnecessary chemicals and not really do much else (probably okay for mommy as long as you get residue off). Also i'm sure you already know but remember to gently dry babies right away so they don't have any time to catch a chill. I think fleas can carry tape worm eggs and can cause anaemia, not sure how long that all takes though. Yikes you got insta fur baby family, poor little things are SOOO lucky to find you just in time!!!! Good luck.

Also some yucky but useful information I stumbled across.

Flea life cycle

The adult flea lives permanently on its animal host. Within two days of finding a host and feeding on its blood, the female starts to produce eggs at a rate of 50 a day. The eggs fall off the cat's coat into the environment together with 'flea dirt', which provides food for the hatching larvae. Eggs and larvae may be found anywhere the cat has been, but are particularly concentrated in places where the cat sleeps. The larvae move away from light and penetrate deep into carpet and soft furnishing. Larval development ends with the formation of a pupa in its sticky cocoon. A pre-emerged adult develops in the cocoon where it awaits signals suggesting the presence of a host, such as heat, carbon dioxide and vibrations. The flea can emerge and attach to the host in seconds. However, if no host is present the flea can lie waiting in the cocoon for up to two years. In the right conditions the whole cycle can be completed in 15 days. Centrally heated homes with fitted carpets provide ideal conditions for all year round development of fleas. One adult flea can leave hundreds of eggs, larvae and pre-emerged adults in the house.

ellendar
August 7th, 2007, 01:11 PM
A few weeks ago my idiot of a neighbour moved out of town and abandonned his 3 year old cat on the street. I have known the cat from birth (she was a kitten of my old Queen who passed away recently) so when I saw her in my backyard last night I brought her into my house. She was very visably pregnant, but didn't show signs of fleas. Well during the night she gave birth and while I was examining the kittens a few minutes ago I discovered that they are infested with fleas.

I have never had kittens with fleas before, and I am very concerned for the well being of the kittens. Unfortunetly I won't be able to see a vet anytime soon (my small towns one and only is gone away for two weeks) and I need to know what I can do to rid the little darlings of the fleas. I've read a few things on the internet, but am hesitant to try them without consulting a vet, so I am hoping for a response from one, or from someone who has worked with one before.

Any help is very appreciated.
If you cannot see a vet right away then try calling another vet clinic or even try calling the shelter for advice this situation can be rather tricky
it may be necessary for the mother to be treated for fleas but while she is nursing I am not sure if flea meds are advised or safe
you can try a dietary method feed her canned cat food mixed with some Brewers yeast this will help repel her fleas and help prevent anemia as well. it's full of the B vitamins cats thrive on.; She might be able to pass that on to her nursing kittens. It has to be given every time she eats 'though mix the canned cat food with a teaspoon of olive oil to aid in digestion and getting rid of furballs don't give more than a teaspoon a day as it loosens them somewhat if you do. She can have as much Brewers yeast as you can mix in also you can buy this bulk some grocery stores sell it as nutritional yeast!
as soon as the kittens are older you can try a flea shampoo and the best way to bathe them is in a bucket put a washcloth on the rim of the bucket just fold it over the rim and stand the kitten up in the water letting them hang on to the wash cloth in a standing position while you hold them also and shampoo accordingly using a sponge to rinse them with talk gently to them if they are hanging on to the bucket side while digging their claws into the folded washcloth they are not as likely to claw at you or feel panicked since they can feel the bottom of the bucket an their heads are above the water, it helps if one person holds the kitty and the other person washes it but i have done it easily by myself, never use a sink where they can slip or get loose, once shampooed and thoroughly rinse roll a towel around the kitten to start drying him leaving only his head out at the end
then rub the kitten as dry as possible with the towel and put him in a flea free environment where he can finish drying; don't return him to the mother until her flea situation has been dealt with
also might be a good idea to simply change her bedding on a daily basis, tossing the old bedding in the washer and dryer once or twice a day, many of the fleas will expire in the wash during this process reducing their infestation somewhat she will get used to you doing this. use soft clean towels or baby blankets.
when the vet returns they might want to give the mother a shot to get rid of her fleas as soon as the kittens are old enough, this shot also takes care of ear mite infestations and it is relatively inexpensive again keep changing her linen twice a day the clothes dryer kills fleas and their eggs and keep your house thoroughly vacuumed that helps suck up fleas, and their eggs you might want to put some flea powder in the vacuum cleaner bag to prevent fleas from hatching in there just sprinkle some:usa: on the floor sevin dust works too.
and then suck it up keep your floors vacumed that is the safest way to keep your home clean of fleas and good luck finding good homes for the kittens, try asking a vet if they can put them out at their office on display to get homes, I had a feral cat altered at the vets and she sold eight cats for $25.00 each with their worming and shots to approved homes. The Mother was spayed and released near my home and that was some years ago she still comes around and must be about nine years old so spaying really helps with their health a lot. be sure and give her vitamins vitamin deficiencies in cats encourage fleas and healthy cats do not taste nearly as good to fleas.:crazy:
another thing is always move their bedding inside a plastic bag so fleas don't jump off onto the floor:loser: :pawprint:

ellendar
August 7th, 2007, 01:12 PM
A few weeks ago my idiot of a neighbour moved out of town and abandonned his 3 year old cat on the street. I have known the cat from birth (she was a kitten of my old Queen who passed away recently) so when I saw her in my backyard last night I brought her into my house. She was very visably pregnant, but didn't show signs of fleas. Well during the night she gave birth and while I was examining the kittens a few minutes ago I discovered that they are infested with fleas.

I have never had kittens with fleas before, and I am very concerned for the well being of the kittens. Unfortunetly I won't be able to see a vet anytime soon (my small towns one and only is gone away for two weeks) and I need to know what I can do to rid the little darlings of the fleas. I've read a few things on the internet, but am hesitant to try them without consulting a vet, so I am hoping for a response from one, or from someone who has worked with one before.

Any help is very appreciated.
If you cannot see a vet right away then try calling another vet clinic or even try calling the shelter for advice this situation can be rather tricky
it may benecessary for the mother to be treated for fleas but while she is nursing I am not sure if flea meds are advised or safe
you can try a dietary method feed her canned cat food mixed with some Brewers yeast this will help repel her fleas and she might be able to pass that on to her nursing kittens. It has to be given every time she eats 'though mix the canned cat food with a teaspoon of olive oil to aid in digestion and getting rid of furballs don't give more than a teaspoon a day as it loosens them somewhat if you do.
as soon as the kittens are older you can try a flea shampoo and the best way to bathe them is in a bucket put a washcloth on the rim of the bucket just fold it over the rim and stand the kitten up in the water letting them hang on to the wash cloth in a standing position while you hold them also and shampoo accordingly using a sponge to rinse them with talk gently to them if tey are hanging on to the bucket side while digging their claws into the folded washcloth they are not as likely to claw at you or feel paniced since they can feel the bottom of the bucket an their hads are above the water, it helps if one person holds the kitty and the other person washes it but i have done it easily by myself, never use a sink where they can slip or get loose, once shampooed and thoroughly rinse roll a towel around the kitten to start drying him leaving only his head out at the end
then rub the kitten as dry as possible with the towel and put him in a flea free environment where he can finish drying; don't return him to the mother until her flea situation has been dealt with
also :usa: might be a good idea to simply change her bedding on a daily basis, tossing the old bedding in the washer and dryer once or twice a day, many of the fleas will expire in the wash during this process reducing their infestation somewhat she will get used to you doing this. use soft clean towels or baby blankets.
when the vet returns they might want to give the mother a shot to get rid of her fleas as soon as the kittens are old enough, this shot also takes care of ear mite infestations and it is relatively inexpensive again keep changing her linen twice a day the clothes dryer kills fleas and their eggs and keep your house thoroughly vacuumed that helps suck up fleas, yuo might want to put some flea powder in the vacuum cleaner bag to prevent fleas from hatching in there just sprinkle some:usa: on the floor sevin dust works too.
and then suck it up keep your floors vacumed that is the safest way to keep your home clean of fleas and good luck finding good homes for the kittens, try asking a vet if they can put them out at their office on display to get homes, I had a feral cat altered at the vets and she sold eight cats for $25.00 each with their worming and shots to approved homes. The Mother was spayed and released near my home and that was some years ago she still comes around and must be about nine years old so spaying really helps with their health a lot.

SableCollie
August 7th, 2007, 01:35 PM
First of all, it was good of you to take in these babies! You do have to get the fleas off as they can cause anemia, especially in very small babies. If you can get a flea comb from a pet store, you can flea comb them carefully, swishing the comb in warm water mixed with mild soap to remove the fleas from the comb so you are not just putting them back on the kittens. Also *any* shampoo will kill fleas if you leave the lather on for at least 10 minutes. When we get small kittens infested with fleas, we wash them with the most mild shampoo we can find, working up a good lather, careful not to get it in their eyes or mouth, then we wrap them in a towel and hold them for 10 minutes to let the lather sit, making sure they don't get too chilled. Then we rinse, trying to get most of the fleas off, then dry them thoroughly, flea comb them, and put them in a nice warm spot with their mother. This gets rid of most of the adult fleas, however not the eggs, so you will have more fleas eventually. When they reach 8 weeks, frontline them.

Also it is a good idea to take them to the vet to make sure they are not anemic...if they are the vet might prescribe vitamin drops. Also you will want to deworm them (we do 6 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks dewormings), they can get tapeworms from fleas, so you will want to ask your vet about worming medicine that can treat tapeworms (avoid the over-the-counter stuff.)

Good luck!