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Introducing dog to cat - Suggestions Needed

jennipets
October 28th, 2006, 04:23 AM
Hi,
I just found this great place to looking for some advices. thanks in advance. I am thinking about bring in a dog into my life, never have dog before, the first thing I concerned is new puppy need satisfy my cat , I want she will get a company ,not a enemy, I want her life get better not worse. next, I would like the new puppy has some personality , such as , don't bark too much, smart,loyal, able to take care itself when I go to work. I did a lot research, but not quiet sure even the books told me some breeds will get along with cats. anybody have experience have cat and dog both at home, please give me some advices. thanks.


jenni

jesse's mommy
October 28th, 2006, 08:10 AM
What about your cocker spaniel?

http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=32165

erykah1310
October 28th, 2006, 08:29 AM
A cocker would be a good pick however, my American Cocker was a tad yappy.

I have many cats and 3 dogs and they all get along wonderfully. Only had one "incident' with them but it was more of an accident.


[quote]able to take care itself when I go to work.[quote]

No dog can really take care of itself... how long of hours do you work??

OntarioGreys
October 29th, 2006, 03:01 PM
Hi Jenni, I would recommend a young adult dog rather than a puppy, a puppy is a lot of work especially for the first 2 years, they like to chew on everything and can do a fair bit of damage chewing things up plus a puppy cannot hold it until you come home from work, they need to be taken outside constantly to go to the bathroom, until they are old enough to have full bowel and bladder control. Housetraining a puppy is very very hard if are you working fulltime, it could a year or more to get the pup fully housetrained.

A puppy is full of energy wanting to play and can often be too rough and persistent in it desire to play, and your cat may not be too happy with a pup that is always trying to chase and pounce on them and grab them with their mouth, an before the adult teeth come in the puppy teeth are like little razors hurt.
The cat may hiss and swats the pup and teach it to behave but some pups will think it is part of the game and they willl continue to pester the cat, which an adult cat is not going to enjoy, so your likely going to have to keep them seperated for much of the time till the puppy matures. It can be done but a lot of work is involved and patience is needed till the pup matures, In north America most of the dogs ending up in shelters a between 6 months and 2 years old simply because people never realized how much work a puppy is to raise, they will go though a serious chewing stage when they start teething they will try chewing on everything furniture walls, window sills, your shoes , you may have rugs damaged from peeing an pooping until they they finally learn to go outside only, so think very seriously about it they are a lot more work than a cat.


With an adult dog they are more settled and it is easier is to teach them to be gentle and not chase the cat as long as they do not have a high prey drive, and an adult dog is more likely going to respect an adult cat that slaps it and you you do not have to go through the same work as you would with a puppy.


Your cat may not be too happy at first with a strange animal in the house and may want to hide away and it may take a month or so before it is brave enough to start facing a dog in the house, young kittens that have been raised with dogs have a much easier time adjust to a new dog in the house. Some cats will not handle the change well and behaviour problems will occur such as peeing and pooping outside the litter box, So if you add a dog, your cat will likely hide away most of the time for the first 2 months until it gets comfortable having the dog in the house(and this is very normal cat do not adjust to change well) and then things will get better, many cat owners never expect this and hate seeing their cats so unhappy so simply get rid of the dog rather than wait and give the cat time to adjust. Ask yourself are you willing to give your cat time to get used to having a dog in the house and can you handle seeing your cat scared for the first while, if not do not bother getting a dog, because they to go thru being scared and have to adjusting as well and if you get a dog and return it, they are then forced to go thru the same fears your cat is going thru but multiple times


In my case I introduced a kitten to my 3 adult dogs
in a few days they were getting along pretty good I did have to use a spray bottle with water in it at first to correct the dogs from chasing the kitten, and you will have to supervise them together a lot at first and seperate when you are not home. until I was 100% the dogs would not grab the kitten they were left muzzled.

I have 2 retired racing greyhounds, an american eskimo and a 7 month old chinese crested and 2 cats and I used to foster the racing greyhounds after they retired to help prepare them for lives as pets. about 95% percent can live nicely with cats and they are well suited even for living in an apartment and rarely bark, they are very gentle dogs and do not require a lot of exercise as adults as many other breeds do , they need about 4 outing a day 3 then or 15 minute walks and one 1/2 hour walk is enough exercise, they mostly like to sleep so do well with working families I do know there is a greyhound race track in Macau, China
http://www.macauyydog.com/
maybe it is possible to get an adult dog from them that is not longer suitable for racing , some simply do not like racing or have muscle strains or pulled tendons so can be retired as early as 2 years though most are retired around 5 years old, they can live any where from 12 to 18 years which is longer than most dogs their size and the way they are raised at the track makes adjusting and housetrainng to a home life fairly easy. In Macau they are reared and kept much like the greyhounds in the US, from what I understand from someone who visited the track is the dogs are well care for while they are racing, if someone is interested in make one a pet they will allow the person to adopt but they do not have a formal adoption program like in the US so most will be euthanized after they are finished racing.
I would not recommend a greyhound puppy though to someone unless they had a lot of experience with dogs as they are high energy, very fast as puppies and can get into a lot of mischief but an adult retired racing greyhound makes a wonderful quiet easygoing pet even in a small apartment iwhich is a deluxe home for them after living most of their lives in a 4' by 4' kennel they have already learn to go to the bathroom at regulated times each day which makes them easy to housetrain usually all it takes is one of 2 corrections if yoiu see them attempting to go for them to learn to go outside only.

Most of these picture are taken within a week of a greyhound coming from a racetrack into my home, I use a muzzle till I am 100% sure the dog will not the dog will not try to grab the cat and I spray them with water if they try to chase the cats, after a couple of days most not longer need to be corrected , My cats have grown up with dogs since they were kittens so do not fear new dogs coming into the house so when one arrives they are very curious about the new dog, most of the greyhound have never seen a cat before so are scared of them at first.
[IMG]http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y53/mleg2001/3b4123444d5122b75e4ba320640e90fa.jpg

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y53/mleg2001/my%20gang/37f0386623443a542b8d897ac57918b9.jpg

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y53/mleg2001/my%20gang/3e6c14292d2ed5e50ebc7e3fbde3a825.jpg

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y53/mleg2001/726e519d3345b79dabf4d86479ba1097.jpg

Some will becomes friends with the cat and play gently, most though will learn to tolerate and live peaceful and respect a cat and consider it part of their family. Though if allowed to run loose outside will likely kill a stray cat.

Prin
October 30th, 2006, 12:38 AM
Your cat may not be too happy at first with a strange animal in the house and may want to hide away and it may take a month or so before it is brave enough to start facing a dog in the house, young kittens that have been raised with dogs have a much easier time adjust to a new dog in the house.So it might be easier then since she also has a cocker.;) (see her other thread that jesse's mommy posted in post #2)

marko
October 30th, 2006, 06:20 AM
'm in the same boat as the OP and find this is Excellent information. Thanks OG and others!

Marko