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Top 5 family-friendly dogs?

Prin
October 22nd, 2006, 01:03 AM
Not sure if I agree...
From here:
http://www.canadianliving.com/canadianliving/client/en/Family/DetailNews.asp?idNews=234970&idsm=312
But I'll paste it just in case the link dies...


Top 5 family-friendly dogs
Find out what breed will make the best pet for your family.

By Lorri Benedik

Welcoming a pet into your home can be an exciting adventure and, much like the arrival of a new child, will most certainly be life-altering. If the species you select to be your new housemate is of the canine persuasion, there is much to think about before plunging in muzzle first. For example, you must decide if it's a large, small, active or more sedentary dog that will be right for your family.

What will be its role; are you looking for a playmate, guard dog or hunting companion? Some pooches need lots of grooming while others require very little. Each breed has a unique set of physical, behavioural and personality traits, which must be properly matched to the preferences of your household.

Dr. Wojtek Wybranowski, known affectionately as "Dr. W" to patients and staff at Animal 911 Veterinary Hospital in Pierrefonds, Que., recommends the following breeds for families with children. Each can be purchased for $800 to $1,000 and will require the same investment to examine, immunize and neuter. Keep in mind that the larger the dog, the more expensive your new pal will be to feed.





1. Golden retriever (60-80 lbs) or Labrador retriever (50-60 lbs)
Why they're great for a family:
These two "sporting dog" breeds tie in the popularity contest for overall favourite family pets. They are by nature loving, loyal and gentle and will patiently tolerate even the most affectionate young child's prodding and poking. Retrievers love to swim and tend to retain their puppylike playfulness throughout adulthood.

How much care?
Retrievers need plenty of vigorous exercise and, because they shed quite a bit, will require daily brushing.

Rural or urban:
All dogs enjoy the wide open spaces of a rural setting, but retrievers adapt well to city life with lots of playtime outdoors.




2. Collie (40-65 lbs)
Why they're great for a family:
Good-natured and energetic, the collie has been a popular pet since the first time Lassie appeared on TV. They are beautiful, great with children and easy to train. The collie is considered by many to be the best family companion of all the "herding breeds." And, if Timmy ever falls down the well...

How much care?
The collie's thick coat requires regular brushing. They need plenty of exercise and while a simple walk in the park might be enough to satisfy another dog, your collie's working nature may require you to be creative. Keep him stimulated by asking him to fetch, herd or climb over or under something.

Rural or urban:
Your collie will adapt well to city life but needs space to run around in frequently.






3. Boxer (55-70 lbs)
Why they're great for a family:
Categorized as a "working dog," the boxer's mischievous, ready-for-anything gaze is just a hint of his true zest for life. He is affectionate, a true-blue friend and a great guardian. The boxer's athletic appearance -- muscular and short-coated with a square head -- gives him a serious air, but this dog is by nature goofy and fun-loving.

How much care?
Boxers have very short fur but they do shed and will benefit from daily brushing. They love to clown around and will be thrilled to romp in the park several times per week.

Rural or urban:
Your boxer will live happily in the city but needs a long, brisk walk every day.



4. Miniature schnauzer (11-20 lbs)
Why they're great for a family:
Unlike their larger "working dog" counterparts (standard and giant schnauzers), the miniature schnauzer is considered a terrier. Reliable and affectionate, the mini schnauzer is a terrific family pet. Much like your great-uncle Esmond, schnauzers can be a bit stubborn, are quite talkative and like to have the last word. However, they are also playful and exuberant and make great watchdogs.

How much care?
The miniature schnauzer's wiry coat is hair -- not fur. They are one of many hypoallergenic breeds and do not shed at all. However, they still need regular brushing and haircuts.

Rural or urban: These lovable dogs are good apartment dwellers but have a tendency to gain weight if they don't get plenty of exercise.




5. Yorkshire terrier (3-7 lbs)
Why they're great for a family:
The "Yorkie" is one of the most popular family pets of the "toy" breeds. Alert, spirited and fiercely loyal, the Yorkshire terrier makes a great watchdog, despite its obvious shortcomings. The Yorkie is an ideal lap dog and gets along well with other pets, including cats.

How much care?
The Yorkie's long, shiny coat requires daily combing and brushing as well as regular shampooing.

Rural or urban:
These dogs are perfect for city life and get all the exercise they need just running around and playing indoors.



We have only touched upon purebred dogs in this article. There is a wide range of mixed breeds that make excellent family pets as well. The schnoodle (schnauzer/poodle mix), labradoodle (labrador/poodle mix) and cocapoo (cocker spaniel/poodle mix) are three popular ones. Cute names, too. Mixed-breed dogs, sometimes referred to as "mutts," are every bit as loving, loyal and intelligent as their purebred brothers and may be less prone to inherited disorders.

Choosing the right dog for your family may require some energy but, after all, it's nothing you wouldn't do for your best friend. Definitely don't agree with the "less prone to inherited disorders" part, but I'm glad they called all the doodles "mutts".

Oh and IMO, yorkies should NOT be on that list whatsoever. JMO!

rainbow
October 22nd, 2006, 01:16 AM
Well, that's just that author's opinion. ;) But, at least she's smart enough to call the designer breeds doodles "mixed breeds" :thumbs up

BMDLuver
October 22nd, 2006, 08:02 AM
sheesh....... not a berner anywhere on that list.... :rolleyes:

jesse's mommy
October 22nd, 2006, 08:11 AM
BMD I was almost thinking the same thing:

sheesh....... not a pittie anywhere on that list.... :rolleyes:

100%doglover
October 22nd, 2006, 08:30 AM
Oh and IMO, yorkies should NOT be on that list whatsoever. JMO!

I couldn't agree more! A tiny toy breed? As great as they can be, I wouldn't think it would be the ideal pet for a house with kids.

jesse's mommy
October 22nd, 2006, 08:36 AM
I vote for replacing the yorkie with a pittie!!! :D

~michelle~
October 22nd, 2006, 10:19 AM
arent collies not the best with small children either as they can have a tendancy to try and "herd them" and toy breeds+(most)children= bad idea

wdawson
October 22nd, 2006, 10:37 AM
i second jesses moms motion :D

jesse's mommy
October 22nd, 2006, 11:11 AM
Since the motion was seconded, I propose that we put the change in place! :crazy:

meb999
October 22nd, 2006, 11:35 AM
I think Boxers should be bumped to number 1 ---- that's my completely UN-biased opinion :D

Rottielover
October 22nd, 2006, 11:39 AM
I go with my daughters favorite...The rottweiler.....You tell Harley that he is not supposed to be good with kids, he won't listen

mafiaprincess
October 22nd, 2006, 08:09 PM
Not sure most of that list flies.. Most good yorkie breeders wouldn't be selling to people with really young kids.. Herders depending upon the family may be a bad idea.. Lot of people won't give them a job to put their instincts into..
And how many families will actually exercise a lab like dog to their potential.. you could end up with the terror chewing walls because you 'didn't know' and it was 'suggested' as a good family choice..

MyBirdIsEvil
October 22nd, 2006, 08:23 PM
These two "sporting dog" breeds tie in the popularity contest for overall favourite family pets. They are by nature loving, loyal and gentle and will patiently tolerate even the most affectionate young child's prodding and poking. Retrievers love to swim and tend to retain their puppylike playfulness throughout adulthood.

Labradors are too much for the average family. Popularity doesn't equal compatability and there are much better dogs for an average family..

Number of labs and golden retrievers(+mixes) that need homes from petfinder.com:
Labrador Retriever - 15,050
Golden Retriever - 2700

Doesn't that say something? Goldens aren't really anything like labs, so I'm not sure why they're listed together, it seems extremely misleading to me. In general, goldens are a lot more suited to the average family than a lab, and I wouldn't suggest a lab at all to the average household.

I'm not really a fan of these lists because they go more by popularity than anything, and popular doesn't = good house pet.

Prin
October 22nd, 2006, 09:17 PM
Best family dog:
A two year old (and above) that has proven to be good with kids, and vice versa.

Frenchy
October 22nd, 2006, 09:21 PM
Best family dog:
A two year old (and above) that has proven to be good with kids, and vice versa.

:thumbs up I second that !

rainbow
October 22nd, 2006, 09:27 PM
Best family dog:
A two year old (and above) that has proven to be good with kids, and vice versa.

Exactly. :thumbs up And, that's probably why there are so many labs in shelters because they don't usually settle down and mature until they are 2-3 years old.

And, as much as most people dislike huskies, all the ones I've seen plus the three I've had are very good with kids.

MyBirdIsEvil
October 22nd, 2006, 09:27 PM
The only dog I had as a child, was a rottweiler, a dog that's not recommended for families, and she was the sweetest dog ever, great with kids and other dogs, harmless to cats.
She was around 2 or 3 when we took (stole? :evil: ) her from the neighbor who hadn't fed her in weeks (you could see every single bone and she was weak). So I totally agree if you find an adult dog that has been proven to be good around children, and fits your lifestyle, the breed is secondary.

I always have to wonder why labs are recommended though, because the only people I knew growing up who had labs were people that used them as hunting dogs, and though they got tons of exercise they were still somewhat destructive every once in awhile.

meb999
October 22nd, 2006, 09:29 PM
Best family dog:
A two year old (and above) that has proven to be good with kids, and vice versa.

I also agree 100% That's one of the BIG advantages of getting a rescue. That and, of course, saving a dog's life!

coppperbelle
October 23rd, 2006, 06:44 AM
Where are the standard poodles? Mnay years ago when I was researching a breed that would be good with kids the top one was a standard poodle, followed by a golden retriever. I opted for the golden retriever but eventually got myself a standard poodle also. She was a terror and would attack small dogs/puppies and once bit my daughter's friend. She didn't fit well on that list. All my goldens however have been wonderful around children.
I can't speak for other breeds because my experience is with goldens but if bred properly and brought home as a puppy and raised with love and patience will live up to their reputations as will most other breeds including mutts I am sure.
As for there being more labs and goldens on petfinders it is because they are so popular so there are more of them being bred than a lot of other breeds. It is not that many more of these breeds are being given up only that there are more of them born. If you look at the ratio of goldens born to goldens being given up it is probably the same as that of some other breeds.

hazelrunpack
October 23rd, 2006, 01:33 PM
I always have to wonder why labs are recommended though, because the only people I knew growing up who had labs were people that used them as hunting dogs, and though they got tons of exercise they were still somewhat destructive every once in awhile.

If our old lab was any indication of the breed, labs are full of hi-jinx when they're young. While still in that stage, they might get destructive of furniture or shoes, but they're usually sweet and well-behaved with children. The biggest danger is getting bowled off your feet by one or whapped with those steel tails! :D But most of the labs I know are very good with kids--and they only get better as they get older.

Melei'sMom
October 23rd, 2006, 02:08 PM
hmmm... only one of those on the list would make my top 5 for families. the boxer, if you are a very active family that will include the dog in your activities.

my other choices for active families are malamutes and shepards.

not so active families... shihtzus and hmmm...ok, i have a top 4 lol

I think any dog can be a good family pet, IF it is with the right family for that dog!:)

Angies Man
October 26th, 2006, 11:38 PM
The reason a list like this is stupid is that every dog is different--a product of both breeding and socialization.

I've had two standard poodles, they are exact opposites. My male was mouthy and alpha--couldn't be trusted with kids, small pets, etc. A nice dog for me, but difficult to control, would growl and snap if challenged. He thought it was a great game to run off--which darn near killed him.

My current Std. Poodle, a female, is playful and energetic, but doesn't have any tendency to be snappy. Off leash, she stays close, comes when she is called. Totally trustworthy with kids, slightly timid when meeting someone for the first time. I have a 5 month old grand niece (?) and both Angie and my brother's 5 year old female German Shepard (Sadie) love to sneak up on her and give her a very wet lick on the cheek. Neither dog would ever hurt her.

The best individual dogs I've seen with children have been Great Danes. The Dane tail can be a lethal thing, but the Danes I've known seemed to realize this and and kept their tails down around little ones. And they were very tolerant of little ones pulling at the big doggie's tail, ears,& fingers in the mouth, nose, & eyes and the inevitable climbing little kids end up doing. My Gus had my niece fall asleep on him more than once. And seemed very happy with the situation. He was incredibly protective, too.

Rotties, pits, dobies, boxers, etc. can be very intolerant of children--but for every one that's not suitable, there's probably a multitude that are happiest with their kids and very protective of their families.

phoenix
October 27th, 2006, 07:54 AM
Angie's man, do you know anything about boxers?

I don't think so, as you've put them in a very interesting list of dogs that don't really share their characteristics at all. You seem to think that all short haired muscle-y dogs are the same.

I love all the breeds you listed; but boxers are well known in general for being very good with kids. Here is right from the breed standard AKC:

Character and Temperament
These are of paramount importance in the Boxer. Instinctively a hearing guard dog, his bearing is alert, dignified, and self-assured. In the show ring his behavior should exhibit constrained animation. With family and friends, his temperament is fundamentally playful, yet patient and stoical with children. Deliberate and wary with strangers, he will exhibit curiosity, but, most importantly, fearless courage if threatened. However, he responds promptly to friendly overtures honestly rendered. His intelligence, loyal affection, and tractability to discipline make him a highly desirable companion. Any evidence of shyness, or lack of dignity or alertness, should be severely penalized.

As others have said, it does depend a lot on the individual dog's personality and past. However, with well bred boxers, they are expected to be good with kids. Their history is as a family guard dog and they form intense bonds with their people.

Golden Girls
October 27th, 2006, 09:09 AM
TOP 5 FAMILY-FRIENDLY DOGS

1, 2, 3, 4 & 5. Any breed properly raised and socialized in a loving environment :pawprint:

phoenix
October 27th, 2006, 10:15 AM
while any individual CAN be, some breeds are definitely more tolerant in general than others.

Dogastrophe
October 27th, 2006, 10:51 AM
As with many of these types of lists they have inherient flaws, mainly because they are based on popularity of the breed. Newf's are not (at least not nowaways) a popular breed, however for the most part they are excellent family dogs. the average normally well natured Newf will generally tolerate toddlers climbing on them, using their fur/ears/tails to pull themselves up into a stand, etc (not that this is recommended or appropriate behaviour for the child to engage in).

I'm certain that we could all list breed after breed (including the best breed of all: the mutt) of great family dogs. :pawprint:

meb999
October 27th, 2006, 11:02 AM
Angie's man, do you know anything about boxers?

I don't think so, as you've put them in a very interesting list of dogs that don't really share their characteristics at all. You seem to think that all short haired muscle-y dogs are the same.


I'm not saying this becasue I own one.... When we were researching breeds (we did research for almost a year before we settled on a breed that was right for us), at the very top of the list was that it should be good with kids. All the books I've read, all the internet research I've done, and in all the 'TOP DOGS FOR KIDS', boxers were always right near the top of the list.

I completely agree that it depends on the background, the way a dog is raised and on it's parents temperament....but boxers are well-known to be excelent family dogs. They are gentle with kids, and are protective of them.

And although I love pits, rotties and dobes, and I know alot of them can be extremely good with children, that isn't necessarily part of their breed standard as it is with boxers.

LM1313
October 27th, 2006, 12:12 PM
For families with kids some breeds are definitely better than others . . . For example, a fragile toy breed would be in danger of being hurt in a family with kids in the clumsy stage. (IMO the yorkie is not a top family dog for this reason.) Some breeds are not tolerant of or are unhappy with a lot of noise and running around and hubbub--also not ideal if you have several kids whose idea of a good time is making as much noise as possible.

Individual dogs from any breed can make a great (or horrible) pet in a family with children and families differ in their knowledge of dogs and dog training (not to mention the ages and temperaments of the kids), but in general some breeds are better suited to the AVERAGE family than others. ;)

One thing that list doesn't take into account is that families are less active now then they used to be . . . If you've got kids who love running around the yard, going exploring, and throwing frisbees, a labrador would be a great choice (if you can survive the adolescent stage ;) ), but if everyone hunkers down in front of the TV or computer whenever possible, then it would be a horrible choice.

Angies Man
October 30th, 2006, 04:22 PM
Angie's man, do you know anything about boxers?

.


You're right, I haven't had any close contact with a boxer in almost 40 years (since I was a kid.) The boxers I knew as a kid (in retrospect I realize) were not well socialized, were strongly bonded to one person, and were not tolerant of strangers, much less children.

It goes back to my premise that any dog can be poorly socialized and intolerant of strangers & kids--but I have known, and do currently know, wonderful family pets that happen to be rotties and pitties, and have also know toy poodles, dachsies, (and other,) and my own, passed on male Std. Poodle who given the right circumstances would tear your throat out.

If I offended you by including boxers in with rotties, it was certainly not intentional. We all tend to judge breeds we've met by the best and worst examples we come in contact with. My impression of Boxers goes back to my aunt's dog Trixsie when I was a very young boy, and one of my brother's roommate's dogs when I was in my late teens--neither dog was to be taken for granted. . .

phoenix
October 30th, 2006, 06:25 PM
no you didn't offend me... just wanted to educate you a bit about generalizing and breed standards :thumbs up

you're right... not every dog is up to the standard tho.