Pets.ca - Pet forum for dogs cats and humans 

-->

Help I want another dog

comesitstay
October 20th, 2006, 04:11 AM
I need a dog behavior specialist I think. I got my Jack Russell from a shelter when he was at least 18 months and he is the most antisocial animal I have ever known. He does not have any problem with the cat that comes and goes, since the cat made his nose bleed from claw pricks a few times. Now the two of them actually lay down and nap together sometimes. But anytime he sees another dog or animal and even some people through the window or when we are out he goes nuts. I don't dare take him out without a leash, but while he is inside with the family you could not ask for a better dog. My problem is that I would very much like to have another dog in our family, and I am being told by my husband that it will never be possible to bring home another dog. Does anyone know if it is possible to get this dog of mine to become friendly with another resident dog?
I sincerely believe it is possible, but I will abide by the majority vote on this. Please give me something to go by, besides just opinions. I think he could actually become friends and gain a playmate, but maybe I am delusional,

rainbow
October 20th, 2006, 04:53 AM
Your JR desperately needs to be socialized. I would suggest taking him to obedience school to start with where you all will benefit.

comesitstay
October 20th, 2006, 05:09 AM
He is now considered an adult dog (5years old) - will it still work? And don't the obedience schools all expect you to have a dog that can be in the same room with the other dogs in class?

BMDLuver
October 20th, 2006, 07:00 AM
If you have one in your area, I would suggest you try doggie daycare once a week. Explain to the people that he is anti social and can they work on this with you.

I would not suggest getting another dog until the one you have has all the kinks worked out so to speak.

muckypup
October 20th, 2006, 07:47 AM
I think you need more control of your JRT before you get second dog. He doesn't have to be a social butterfly but more importantly he needs to respect you as the pack leader.
My first GSD is dog aggressive but I didn't have problems integrating my second GSD.
Look for a dog with a personality compatible with your current dog. It'd be better if you looked for a female with a minimum 2 year age difference.

mafiaprincess
October 20th, 2006, 11:34 AM
I like the idea of doggie daycare as long as you are on the level with them as to why the dog is there.

Some training facilities have 'growl classes' A class specifically for dogs with aggression issues to work through them. Few places near me do. Not sure what's available near you though.

pitgrrl
October 20th, 2006, 11:44 AM
Perhpas I'm coming at this somewhat biased, but are JRT not some what prone to dog aggression?
Given this, is there not a limit to what insticts one can completely train or socialize out of a dog?

For example, I have two dog aggressive dogs. Through training they've been able to learn to ignore other dogs, one would probably never guess they were dog aggressive in the least, but I would never trust them off leash with other dogs I don't know for certain they get along with and even then it would be strictly supervised. These are the limits, for them, of training vs. breeding.

I'm not meaning to suggest that a second dog could not be successfuly integrated into the household, if one went about it the right way with the right match. I guess what I'm asking and/or suggesting, is that perhaps with a dog aggressive dog, of a breed known to often have this trait, the goal of leashless frolicking with other dogs is an unrealisic goal. Maybe really good obediance, careful, controlled socialization and good behavior during leashed walks is more appropriate?

BMDLuver
October 20th, 2006, 01:20 PM
Perhpas I'm coming at this somewhat biased, but are JRT not some what prone to dog aggression?
Given this, is there not a limit to what insticts one can completely train or socialize out of a dog?

For example, I have two dog aggressive dogs. Through training they've been able to learn to ignore other dogs, one would probably never guess they were dog aggressive in the least, but I would never trust them off leash with other dogs I don't know for certain they get along with and even then it would be strictly supervised. These are the limits, for them, of training vs. breeding.

I'm not meaning to suggest that a second dog could not be successfuly integrated into the household, if one went about it the right way with the right match. I guess what I'm asking and/or suggesting, is that perhaps with a dog aggressive dog, of a breed known to often have this trait, the goal of leashless frolicking with other dogs is an unrealisic goal. Maybe really good obediance, careful, controlled socialization and good behavior during leashed walks is more appropriate?
What you are assuming is that this dog is in fact dog aggressive. Just because a dog, no matter the breed, barks and lunges at other dogs does not mean he/she is aggressive. There are two issues here that need to be addressed, one being that the OP is not confident with the dog because of it's behaviour in public, meaning that there is always that niggling worry about meeting up with another dog that translates down the leash to the dog and encourages the dog to feel uncertain about all other dogs. This to me suggests that some training together is needed.

The other issue being that the dog gets no socialisation as a result of this behaviour so really has never even learned how to play with another dog or interact with another dog. Thus the need to at least try to find some type of daycare, etc where in a controlled environment the dog can meet other dogs.

Also, I think that the JRT Rescue may have something to say about the fact that you find JRT's somewhat prone to be dog aggressive. While at woofstock there were 7 of them together. They are bred to kill rodents not other dogs so I beg to differ on them being classed as prone to be dog aggressive dogs, just as I'm sure you would not want all pitbulls to be classed as such due to the fact they are a certain breed.

Sorry, this is not meant as a direct hit at you but rather to further the discussion and recognize the behaviour for what it is, meaning that we can't assume it is dog aggression nor can we assume it is merely lack of socialisation. A professional really does need to assess and guide in this circumstance.

Prin
October 20th, 2006, 02:07 PM
Perhpas I'm coming at this somewhat biased, but are JRT not some what prone to dog aggression?
Given this, is there not a limit to what insticts one can completely train or socialize out of a dog?
I agree with BMD. JRTs can be dominant, just like any other dog, but from what I've seen with my dad's dog and a couple of others, is they pretend to be submissive so they don't get killed by the big dogs (I assume), but then dominate when the other dog isn't prepared. My dad's jack plays with dogs all the time, but when he stays around other dogs for longer periods of time, his dominant colors come out and he has to be watched.

But the aggression I've seen in Jacks (aside from rodent killing) has always been dominance. I think it's rare for a jack to just flat out attack for no reason with no warning.:shrug:

If your JRT is very dominant, even if he was social, it might be hard to find a match for him. Two very dominant dogs will never get along, IMO. They would never be able to be trusted to be alone together.

First thing, IMO, is to get a better leadership role for yourself (obedience classes would help that) and then move on to socialization, when you are a stronger alpha.:shrug:

Lissa
October 20th, 2006, 04:51 PM
I agree that training, socialization and obedience training are necessary. I think its completely feasible for a 5 year old dog to learn what is expected of a socially "sound" dog.

Click to Calm by Emma Parsons deals with dog on dog aggression and is an excellent resource. Fight! by Jean Donaldson is also helpful. But more than anything, I agree that obedience courses (positive methods!) will be what helps the most!

Good Luck!

pitgrrl
October 20th, 2006, 05:25 PM
What you are assuming is that this dog is in fact dog aggressive. Just because a dog, no matter the breed, barks and lunges at other dogs does not mean he/she is aggressive. There are two issues here that need to be addressed, one being that the OP is not confident with the dog because of it's behaviour in public, meaning that there is always that niggling worry about meeting up with another dog that translates down the leash to the dog and encourages the dog to feel uncertain about all other dogs. This to me suggests that some training together is needed.


Perhaps I wasn't too clear, and my apologies if that's the case, I was posing a question in reference to JRTs and dog aggression. My experience with them is limited, and I was asking for clarification because I've read and been told by owners of the breed that they are prone to being DA.

I absolutely agree with your suggestions for figuring out the root of the behavior, my only point was that some dogs truely are dog aggressive to some degree, and I don't think that is an un-manageable thing, nor should it stop someone from being out and about with their dog. It simply takes lots of training, necessary precautions and adjusting one's expectations what situations the dog should be put in.

The only reason for I'm including this perspective in the discussion is because I often see people either putting their dogs, and other people's dogs, in harms way because they are not recognizing and managing dog aggression or equating dog aggression with the dog being "bad" when in every other respect the dog is great.

In anycase, I hope the OP is able to work on her dog's behavior. I noticed some good books were recommended and hopefully they, along with the suggestions of others, will help to resolve the issue.

comesitstay
October 21st, 2006, 12:04 AM
I wanted to thank everyone for the advice. I don't know what his first year and a half were like, but he has wanted to attack any dog around ever since I got him. I thought I could "Love it out of him" but I am not having any luck on my own accept that he is a perfect dog inside the house, and has been since day one, so I am going to take this advice and call some places about different types of training. PetSmart said to bring him in for an evaluation and maybe they could help, so I will start there. Thanks Again for all your suggestions!!:fingerscr

Prin
October 21st, 2006, 12:10 AM
Good luck. Who knows, maybe he is an only doggy. You'll just have to get more cats...:D