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sick puppy

jlkearn
October 19th, 2006, 11:15 PM
I have a 6mon old yorkie and when i got her the breeder said she was perfectly healthy. well she had earmites and one week after I got her she started to cough and 6weeks later she is still coughing and now I notice blood in her stool. I really don't know what to do we are at the doctor every week and my puppy and my pocket are drained. Has any of this happen to anyone else and if so what did you do.

Prin
October 19th, 2006, 11:40 PM
I think you should get your breeder to pay the bills.:shrug:

But I think blood in the stool needs another vet visit asap.

rainbow
October 20th, 2006, 02:27 AM
First of all, welcome to the forum and sorry to hear about your puppy. :grouphug:

Is this a BYB you got her from? It sounds like your puppy is very sick and I would take her to a different vet asap. Good luck and keep us posted. :fingerscr

Hunter's_owner
October 20th, 2006, 10:38 AM
I hope everything is okay with your puppy. I can't offer any help other than seeing your vet. It sounds like she may be really sick. :fingerscr hopefully its nothing too serious.

Shaykeija
October 20th, 2006, 11:05 AM
Blood in the poop is not good. Missie has this on occasion. Unfortunately she has colitis. A round of antibiotics will help. In the mean time feed your little dog boiled chicken and rice. Chop the chicken really fine so she can digest it easier. Go see your vet again ASAP. Your puppy is counting on you to keep it healthy. If you are not satisfied with the level of service you are getting at your current Vet, locate another one. Good luck and post back with the vet findings.:grouphug:

bethaliz
October 20th, 2006, 08:38 PM
First step, back to the vet.

Second step contact your breeder. Most breeders offer at the VERY least a one year health gaurentee. She should be willing to take the dog back and replace the pup with another pup of similar quality from the next litter. If you prefer to keep the pup, she should be willing to pay for some of the vet bills. Depending on the breeder she may refund you up to the original amount you paid for the pup. At that point, you chose to keep the pup, with the understanding of the costs and illnesses.

At 6 months, your probly attached and not willing to part with the pup, so you should at the very least get your money back. DO you have a contract? If you do, check it. If the breeder will not work with you, you can file a complaint with the CKC or AKC, if the dog is registered.

I hope your baby gets better. Keep us up dated.

OntarioGreys
October 21st, 2006, 03:26 AM
Second step contact your breeder. Most breeders offer at the VERY least a one year health gaurentee. She should be willing to take the dog back and replace the pup with another pup of similar quality from the next litter. If you prefer to keep the pup, she should be willing to pay for some of the vet bills. Depending on the breeder she may refund you up to the original amount you paid for the pup. At that point, you chose to keep the pup, with the understanding of the costs and illnesses.


A problem may lie in the fact she did not contact the breeder right away. normally a breeder will require you to take your pup to the vet within 5 business days for a health check to determine if it has any communicable disease or lifethreatening illness if so as the purchaser you are required to contact the breeder immediately to report and provide veterinary proof and to return the dog, being she did not report to the seller and went ahead with medical treatment, it can be assumed she was accepting the dog as is. The health guarante basically guarantees that the dog is free of genetic disease/illnesses, which this sounds more like a viral infections, which chi's as a breed are susceptible to stress related illnesses and cold which this could be, and part of the risk you face owning one, it is no different than if the dog broke it's leg, they are fragile that is the nature of the breed which a breeder has no control over Because of his short nose, the Chihuahua tends to wheeze and snore. His prominent eyes are susceptible to corneal dryness and secondary glaucoma. Prone to slipped stifle, gum problems, colds, stress, and rheumatism. Don't let him lick or eat toxic products, fertilizer or chocolate. Feed lightly as it tends to gain weight. Chihuahua puppies are born with large heads, frequently necessitating cesarean deliveries by a skilled veterinarian. They are vulnerable to fractures and other accidents in puppyhood. Some of the breed have a molera, an unclosed section of the skull which can remain open throughout life. This makes the dog prone to injury.

THe health guarantee provides potection for genetic conditions that would make the pup "unsuitable" as a pet. to would cover some of the following genetic disorders that can occur in chi's
Cleft palate: a condition where the roof of the mouth is not closed and the inside of the nose opens into the mouth.


Collapsed trachea: a condition where the cartilage rings that make up the trachea are malformed and tend to collapse easily.


Corneal dystrophy: an abnormality of the cornea usually characterized by shallow pits in the surface.


Dislocation of shoulder: a condition where the bones of the shoulder joint are out of proper position.


Entropion: an abnormal rolling in of the eyelid.


Factor VIII deficiency or hemophilia A: the most common severe inherited clotting disorder of humans and non-human animals. Inherited as a sex-linked recessive trait (carried by females and manifested in males). Affects most dog breeds.


Glaucoma: abnormally high pressure in the eye.


Hemophilia A: a blood clotting disorder due to deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (this is the most common type of hemophilia in dogs).


Hepatic portosystemic shunt or arteriovenous fistula: a malformation of blood vessels in the liver or an abnormal communication between the arteries and veins in the liver.


Hydrocephalus: a condition where there is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the ventricles of the brain.


Hypoglycemia: a syndrome where the animal has abnormally low blood glucose.


Hypoplasia of dens: a condition where part of the second vetebra fails to develop fully and leads to instability.


Hypothyroidism: a common endocrine disease where the body produces an abnormally low amount of thyroid hormones. An autoimmune destruction of the thyroid gland, which affects more than 50 dog breeds.


Iris atrophy: a condition where the iris (the colored part of the eye) shrinks and becomes non-functional.


Keratitis sicca: a condition where one or both eyes do not produce a normal amount or type of tears.


Keratoconjunctivitis sicca: a condition where one or both eyes do not produce a normal amount or type of tears.


Lens luxation: a condition where the lens in the eye is displaced into an abnormal position.


Mitral valve defects: a group of abnormalities of the mitral valve of the heart.


Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis: a congenital disease where fatty pigments are deposited in the brain and cause brain dysfunction.


Osteochondritis dissecans: a specific form of inflammation of the cartilage of certain joints which causes arthritis.


Osteochondrosis: a group of developmental diseases resulting in abnormal formulation of joint cartilage. Commonly involves the shoulder, stifle, hock or elbow.


Patella luxation: a condition where the knee caps slide in and out of place.


Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA): a disease where the retina slowly deteriorates, producing night blindness.


Pulmonic stenosis: a condition where one of the valves of the heart does not open properly.




dry eyes would not make a chi unsuitable as a pet where as a collapse trachea or patella luxation if severe would so therefore would be covered under the health guarantee.

If the dog had been purchased for show and breeding more of the gentic issues would be covered.

So as it stands a breeder would more likely take the dog back and might offer a refund or possibly partial one, they would not be legally obligated if there was a clause in the contract that require the owner to report and problem with health in the first week as soon as the problem was known.

I am sorry that your pup is ill, but still try contracting the breeder, if lucky they will be sympathetic and offer some compensation.

mona_b
October 21st, 2006, 09:15 AM
What tests were done on her by your vet?...Maybe a second opinion might help.

This may be a BYB.If this pup had earmites,a reputable breeder would have had it all cleared up befor selling.

OG,this isn't a Chi,it's a Yorkie....:)

OntarioGreys
October 21st, 2006, 07:19 PM
OG,this isn't a Chi,it's a Yorkie....



:eek: I must have been sleeping when I read the initial post "yikes" Sorry :o