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Adopted an abused dog

lawrensd
October 3rd, 2006, 02:58 PM
I believe I adopted an abused dog. I just wrote asking how to get her to play and what to do when she is home alone. The response I got was very helpful, now she is being destructive. The only thing she eats in my house is my shoes. In two days she has destroyed two pairs of shoes.
When I discipline her she pees. I don't spank her I just scold her and both times I have scolded her she has peed instantly, what do I do?

Melinda
October 3rd, 2006, 03:44 PM
keep her confined in one area while you're gone and puppy proof it. or as a trainer once told an irate owner that complained that every time she left the house her dog pee'd on her bed..the trainers advice...."shut the bedroom door".......you could put your shoes in a closet or up high so she can't reach them and give her a nice filled kong to chew and keep herself occupied

Prin
October 3rd, 2006, 03:45 PM
You can't scold her for things she does when you're not there.

What she sees is this:
She's sleeping, you come in the door and start screaming and yelling.
You become someone to hide from, especially if she has already been abused. You coming home should be a happy thing, not a scary thing..:shrug:

All you can do is exercise her more before you leave so she is more tired when you're gone, and dog proof. She won't chew shoes if there aren't any to chew. Make sure everything is cleaned off- including wires and things like that that could be dangerous.

If it's too much of an undertaking, you can always block her off in one dog-proofed room with a kiddie gate.

Frenchy
October 3rd, 2006, 08:43 PM
When I discipline her she pees. I don't spank her I just scold her and both times I have scolded her she has peed instantly, what do I do?
I think my Bailey is an abused dog too.I never had to discipline him,he's never done anything wrong except when he sees a cat outside...but anyway,you have to be very mellow and gentle with these dogs,or else he will never get his confidence back.I also heard you have 30 seconds after the mischief to discipline a dog,or else he won't understand why.Take your time and be patient.Don't do anything physicly to him,it will only make matters worst.Good luck.

OntarioGreys
October 3rd, 2006, 09:12 PM
I believe I adopted an abused dog. I just wrote asking how to get her to play and what to do when she is home alone. The response I got was very helpful, now she is being destructive. The only thing she eats in my house is my shoes. In two days she has destroyed two pairs of shoes.
When I discipline her she pees. I don't spank her I just scold her and both times I have scolded her she has peed instantly, what do I do?

Peeing is not proof of abuse, it is a form of dog communication an appeasement behaviour a show of respect that they would use toward a more dominant dog, she has no idea after the fact why you are yelling at her so she is using doggie talk to try and appease you.

As others said it does no god to yell at her once you get home, she can only make the connection to chewing your shoes is a no-no if you catch her in the act, otherwiae all you are doing is confusing her as she has no idea why you are mad.

If you want to learn more about this type of peeing behaviour do a search on "submissive urination" there is some info here but some links may be dead
http://www.uwsp.edu/psych/dog/lib-prob.htm#su

~michelle~
October 3rd, 2006, 09:32 PM
i too have a couple of dogs who love to chew on shoes, and the best solution is to keep your shoes in the closet. and i know you were trying to get her to play before, well maybe she wasnt playing b/c she wasnt comfortable yet, maybe shes starting to get ready to play now. when you adopt a dog (both abused and not) they can take a long time to adjust. going from a home to a pound to another home can be very stressful, especially when you dont know everything they have been through before.
Give her lots of chew toys and a puppy proof area of the house. also make sure they have your scent on it thats probably why she's going fot eh shoes in the first place, they're leather, chewy and have lovely human (you) smell on them

dogmelissa
October 5th, 2006, 02:58 PM
Yay Michelle! That was an excellent post.
I agree with the submissive urination "diagnosis". This is *exactly* what she is doing. I want to add something to it; think about it from a dog's perspective. Even if you're not yelling or even speaking, 90% of your communication is body language. You are standing over her, looking down on her, probably with your hands on your hips, with an "angry" face. That's probably pretty terrifying to her! Try approaching her on your knees, or at least crouching down when you get close to her. I know it's hard, but you have to do everything in your power to be happy to see her. Slap a smile on your face, talk in a high-pitched voice (think about how your voice drops when you're angry) and most importantly, do not make sudden movements. Baby talk her. You can insult her as much as you want, as long as it's in a high-pitched, baby-talk voice. I do it all the time. :p I look my dog in the face, squish his ears in (he has floppy ears), bring his face really close to mine, and tell him that he's the absolutely stupidest, most irritating, pain in the a$$, retarded dog I've ever met--all in baby-talk. The result? I've told him exactly what I think of him (nice vent), and he thinks I've just told him the sweetest thing ever. He usually wags his tail and gives me a kiss at this point, and no matter how much of a mess he's made (usually smearing his poo all over), it doesn't seem so bad at that point. (On a side note, I totally understand how frustrating it can be to have a new dog ruin things--it took me almost a year to housetrain my dog--but it's essential to find things that you like about your dog, otherwise you will never succeed in this)

One other thing to remember is that you have to NEVER EVER EVER call a dog to you (with *any* command!) and when they get there, you punish them for something. Regardless of whether you caught them in the act of doing something bad, if they are punished for coming to you, even once, they probably won't come to you again. Develop a 3-6' radius of "happy space" around you. If your dog is in that radius, everything good happens. If you *must* punish a dog (which I don't agree with), you *must* go to the dog.

I agree that you need to take the shoes away from her... whether that means enclosing the dog in an area of your house, or otherwise securing the shoes (my pantry has a padlock on it to keep my cat out!), but if you take away the temptation, then she can't destroy things that you like. She's obviously a chewer, so it is *very* important that you give her toys that she can chew on without getting in trouble. Best way to do this is if you catch her with a shoe, take it away from her and give her something she can chew on, and praise her immediately for being a wonderful, fantastic, super dog.
I recently watched an episode of Good Dog where Stanley Coren taught a dog that *some* stuffed animals (her toys) were ok to chew on, and some (her guardian's) weren't, using mint extract. Ok toys received a drop of mint, not-ok toys got nothing. Dog learned (and it didn't take long!) that things that smell like mint are ok to chew on, but if it doesn't smell like mint, it can't go in her mouth. That might work for you.
Don't forget that when you leave her alone, whatever you leave her with has to be something that she can't possibly choke on or get hurt on if she gets it into pieces. Rawhide can be dangerous (can break off in large chunks and get stuck in the throat), but the chipped & compressed rawhide bones or sticks are usually ok. Kongs are good cause they are pretty much indestructible, plus don't have a shape that encourages chewing. You can also wet a face cloth and put it in the freezer, and give when it's frozen--though this is probably best as a supervised toy, as if she eats the whole thing it could be very bad. There's lots of good things to chew on; take her and go to a good pet supply store and ask the people to recommend something. Use your judgement and if you think it's something she could get hurt on, don't leave her alone with it.

Thanks for rescuing a dog, and good luck. I'm sure everything will get better in time, but the submissive urination can be tough to deal with. Once she's more established, try taking her to agility, flyball or something so that she builds more confidence, and the urination will more than likely disappear eventually.

Melissa