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Agression

angeldogs
October 2nd, 2006, 02:52 AM
I took jag out for a drive tonight.And stopped by work.He went crazy.there were only 2 guy's there.He was jumping up at them and biting at them.Barking.1 of my fellow truckdrivers showed up for work and told him Jag was aggressive tonight.He stuck his hand out and Jag grab his sweater sleeve and tore it.I was not happy with him and still not.He is all ways excited to meet new people and likes them.I don't know what would have caused him to act like this.We were at the dog park for the first time today and it was busy.He was happy to meet everyone.any ideas as to what could have caused this behavior?.They think i have a psycho dog.:evil:

pitgrrl
October 2nd, 2006, 09:23 AM
Are you sure it was aggression and not over excitedness (which is not really a word, but....)?
Clearly over the internet it's a hard to really know what happened, but I'll give you an example of over excitedness.

Both my dogs get really, really excited to meet people. If I don't give them something to do, like sit or lay down or whatever, they work themselves into a jumping frenzy and will get so hyped up that they sort of forget themselves and will mouth at people's hands and one dog will start to bark.
It is not at all aggression, which is made clear in their body language etc., but rather an inappropriate channelling of lots of excited energy. If not given something to do with that, they take it out in ways that are clearly unacceptable for people, so when we run into someone on the street, or someone comes over to the house, I give them something to do instead.

On the other hand, it could have been aggressive, but obviously you're the only one who was there. Is there any past indications of the dog being aggressive towards people? Was there something about the dog's posturing or demeanor that makes you catagorize the behavior as aggressive?

angeldogs
October 3rd, 2006, 05:47 AM
As soon as i got him out of the truck.He lunged.And it was biting.He was trying to give the 1 a sex change.Usually when he greets he licks and nibbles on the hand.He don't like adults on bike with helmets on.A family freind would show up with his bike and helmet on all the time and we told him to walk the bike from the corner and take his helmet off.He's the same way with my brother and he lives hear with us.but he does walk the bike from the corner.Anyway's he didn't listen and Jag lunged at him first bite got the shirt.2nd time got the skin and left 5 teeth marks in the stomach.That's what he was like at work.And his first time there and seeing any of them.I called the rescue after the first bite.They wouldn't take him.and the freind he bit.Said it was his fault and talked me out of getting rid of him.But i can't have a dog like that with 2 small kids in the house.

papillonmama
October 3rd, 2006, 09:34 AM
Do you often take Jag out at night? Both of our dogs can sometimes be growly at night when they think someone is on their area. It was something that we were able to train Trigs out of, (still working on it with Dory), just through night-time socialization. Even people that they knew they were freaked out about, especially if they were wearing hoods, or dark clothes, I would make sure to always have him on a leash at night, and when someone would talk to me you have to try not to tense up, I would get them to speak slowly, calmly, and to walk slowly and not make any sudden or quick movements. The more you do it, the more they learn that it's okay, there are other things you can try too, below are other ways to get your dog to pay attention to you, even under stressful situations.

It's a good idea to do things slow, so while it's a good idea to get your friend to walk their bike and take of the helmet, why don't you try a different approach, put your dog on leash, get a friend or adult family member to put on a bike helmet and walk by Jag,then to walk a bike with a helmet on, then to ride a bike, while you get Jags attentioin, "Jag, watch me", or, you can teach him to "come to my side", this command is meant to teach your dog that anything that it fears, is something that you, the leader, will deal with. Remember that anytime you teach your dog something new that praise and patience are key. If your dog is making you too impatient just stop for a while, do something else, because key to these socialization techniques, IMO, is that you are also calm. Your dog is going to notice you getting nervous that your dog will lunge, but not interprete like that, he'll think, oh, my person is afraid of that other person who's coming out of the night, better help.

Don't worry, and please don't re-home, I really don't think your dog is beyond training. Just try it out, maybe it'll help.

Good luck:)

Prin
October 3rd, 2006, 11:31 AM
Had he ever met these people before?
How is he now with strangers?
He might have just felt threatened by them. That's the thing with rescue dogs. They have baggage, unfortunately. Sometimes, they end up in a situation that they've been in (badly) before, and react disproportionately. They need some understanding sometimes. :(

If you want to be sure he's ok, get him tested by a behaviorist, and also get general blood tests to rule out aggression from hormonal imbalances.:shrug:

But still, even if he was the best dog in the world, don't leave any dog alone with children.

angeldogs
October 4th, 2006, 05:00 AM
Yes most of our walks are night early morning walks.Mostly 3:00am to 5:00am after i get home from work.He's been fine with strangers.We were at the dog park earlier for the first time and he greeted everybody just fine.That was the first time i had seen him like that.Other then with our friend with the bike helmet.We got Jag from a friend.And we had the blood work for every thing done back in June.We never leave him alone with the kids.Other than that night at work he's really improved.He don't bark at my mom when she walk in anymore or the wife after picking up the kids from school.He's not barking as much anymore.That night was just like it wasn't him.

angeldogs
October 4th, 2006, 05:08 AM
If it was the kid next door it would be under standable Jag hates him.But then again we all do.He can eat him.I would give him a t bone steak.:D He don't even like the mother or sister.But if i'm holding him they can pet him.But nobody else.

jessi76
October 4th, 2006, 09:33 AM
If it was the kid next door it would be under standable Jag hates him.But then again we all do.He can eat him.I would give him a t bone steak.:D

it's nothing to joke about. a dog bite is serious, and always a lose-lose situation, for everyone involved.

my advice... desensitise him... slowly and safely.

angeldogs
October 4th, 2006, 12:02 PM
I know.The daughter is in her Mid 20's to early 30.We just catch her teasing Jag.The son has been doing the same thing.And has broke my front window,keyed up my pickup truck.Cops drove by one night saw him and 2 of his buddies break into my work shed and the 1 that got away.Had gotten a way with some tools.We have also caught his friends teasing him.And all the mother does is make up excuses for them.And lets him do what ever he wants.The sad thing is he's only 12.

dogmelissa
October 4th, 2006, 04:40 PM
I'm reading this thread with a heavy heart. I'm wanting to ask a few questions, but not really wanting the answers to them. I fear that what might be best for the dog is being rehomed, as it sounds as if you aren't able or willing to provide the dog with what he needs, emotionally. Please don't be mad. Here's my interpretation of your situation (which is based solely on my opinions and thoughts composed only from your posts in this thread).

1. You have a "second-hand" dog, and by the sounds of it, a largish one. You got him from a friend, which suggests that he may either have been neglected, abused or simply never socialized & trained (which is IMO, a form of neglect). I have no idea if he is neutered or not, but that can be a contributing factor to all sorts of "aggressive" behaviour. I also have no idea how long he's been with you, but it doesn't sound like too long, nor do I know his age.
2. You are failing to identify situations which can trigger responses you don't desire in your dog. You've identified he doesn't like people with bike helmets on, but apparently haven't done anything to get him over that, other than "taking away the stimulus". You have put a bandaid on a still-bleeding wound.
3. You mentioned that you'd taken him to the dog park for the first time the day he "attacked" your coworkers. Dog parks are notorious for high-stimulus areas. There are often lots of dogs there who are very rude (and who's guardians think it's normal), and those dogs may have put your dog in a bad mood. Then you take him into a new situation (and again, not knowing his history, you could have taken him to what, in his mind, is the scariest place on earth), and don't have good control over your dog. How close was the first person he went after, that Jag was able to reach him the second he got out of your truck? Unless they were standing right next to the door, you should have been able to tighten your grip on Jag's leash and stop him. Was he on a leash?? If not, the fault lies squarely on your shoulders for the first "attack". And immediately after that incident, you should have put Jag back in the truck and left him there while you went on about your business. Obviously something about the situation was too much for him and by forcing him to be a part of it, you risked his life and those of the people he did "attack".
4. You need to educate the people around you. First and foremost, on how to approach a dog that they don't know (and sometimes, even ones they *do* know!). The correct way to approach a dog is to walk slowly towards the dog, speaking in a high-pitched but low volume voice (think like you'd do to a crying child), and holding your hand out, in a loose fist, but palm-up (palm-down is a threat to most dogs). Never *ever ever* look a strange dog in the eyes; especially one who seems afraid, angry, upset or aggressive, as this is a sign of dominance over a dog and if they're are agitated, they will feel the need to protect themselves, enforce *their* dominance or otherwise freak out. Secondly, you need to educate the people around you (neighbours) on how to properly treat a dog, including your kids. If you can't educate them, then your dog needs to be kept away from them. No unsupervised time in the yard if it means that your neighbours will tease him. No unsupervised time with the kids--EVER!! Teach your kids what is and isn't ok to do to a dog, and teach your dog how to remove himself from a situation he doesn't like (ie, give him a safe place like a kennel), and reinforce to your kids that if the dog is in his safe place, he is NOT to be touched, bothered, talked to or looked at. Most importantly is teaching your kids; you cannot blame a dog for biting a child when the child was yanking on his ears or sticking their fingers in his eyes (though that's often what happens, and it's rarely seen as the child's fault). Third is teaching yourself (and your wife and any other person who is a caregiver to the dog). You *must* learn what situations, clothing, specific people or locations, etc, trigger responses in your dog that you don't like. You *must* learn to read your dog. Is he genuinely showing aggressive behaviour, provoked by nothing? Or is he really showing territorial aggression, or more commonly, fear aggression?? Was he surprised by any of the people he "attacked"? Were you more focused on the person approaching (or the act of climbing out of your truck or opening the door or some other task), or were you actually watching your dog? 99% of dogs who show fear aggression first show signs of being afraid; dropping their tail towards their belly, shrinking towards the floor, and other physical signs of being afraid. Chances are that your dog has been afraid and wasn't protected by a human who was supposed to protect him, and so he has decided that he needs to protect himself. You must work with him to identify his fears and find a way to ensure that he understands that YOU have the situation under control, that you will not let the thing that causes him fear to cause harm to him, and that you are there for him.

If you are not willing to work with your dog, then what would be best for him is if he is rehomed. Phone the rescue people and explain the situation; that you have a fearful dog and you aren't able to work with him. If you tell the rescue people that you have an aggressive dog, they won't take him, because that suggests that there is something wrong with the dog. There isn't, he just hasn't been taught that humans will protect him from the things that he is afraid of.
If he is genuinely aggressive, you would not be able to take him to the dog park at all, he would react the same way to *all* people, no matter the situation, and he would need to be euthanized. If you feel that his problems are beyond solving, then you would be better off to have him euthanized.

I know this sounds harsh, and like I'm attacking YOU. I'm not. But I have a dog who could be labelled as aggressive, and I have struggled to get him under control and behaving in such a way so that he wouldn't be labelled. It's been a long frustrating task, and it could have been avoided if my dog hadn't been abused (he was kicked by a man, and 90% of his "aggression" is toward men). The biggest challenge I've faced is in trying to make other people understand that my dog is different and needs to be treated a special way. It's difficult for people to understand that they can't just walk up to my dog (even though he's a small dog), and that I'm turning my back on them because I'm trying to show my dog that I'm not afraid, not because I'm trying to be rude to them. Kids especially don't understand why I won't let them pet or approach my dog. I've worked very hard in the last few months (when I finally started to understand his behaviour) to change him, and I've seen tons of improvements, but there are still many things we need to work on. It's as much an education for ME as it is for him.
I don't want to see any dog euthanized, but most people don't understand what their dog is actually "saying" when they act in ways that we don't find appropriate. Here is a good website for helping you understand what could be going on: http://www.flyingdogpress.com/artlibreg.htm (see specifically "He Just Wants to Say Hi!", "Aggression Basics" & "Some Reasons for Aggression")
If you have any questions, don't hesitate to PM me.
Again, I apologize if this sounded like I was being harsh or insulting to you. I really don't want to see your dog be rehomed, but if your family isn't willing to work with him, the best course of action for all (so you, your kids or your coworkers don't get hurt, and to avoid the dog being labelled as vicious) might be sending him to a home where they can work with him. It might just be something that's beyond your abilities, and there's no shame in that. It just means that the next dog you get you should try to find one who doesn't have so many issues, not that you are a bad person who shouldn't have a dog. There are very few people in the world that I think shouldn't have a dog--the fact that you are here asking for help tells me that you are the kind that SHOULD have a dog, just maybe Jag is too far beyond your abilities.

Good luck.
Melissa

Prin
October 4th, 2006, 08:47 PM
I dunno... I think the combination of being tired from the park and having some sort of instinct about the men he met were too much.

The only thing I have to say is you have to make sure your doggy knows that NO aggression is tolerable, regardless of how you feel about the people he doesn't like. Aggression toward people can get him killed in the long run, so it's something to take very seriously.:shrug:

angeldogs
October 5th, 2006, 01:57 AM
Jag was givin to us because the first owner got deportation papers.The friend he bit was standing to close to jag well he was tied up.And at work he was away from them.I have a 2 handle lead which i was holding the bottom handle.But he was still jumping.And as for the bike helmet i have been working on that.When we are out walking and a bike comes by i shorten the lead and try to reasure him.Educate the neighbours they have 2 dogs.And don't even talk to us.He has a crate and a dog house.And i'm trying that's why i'm on here.Asking questions.Jag is not the first dog.Just the first i've had to train.as for emotionally.I comfort him when he is scared.i praise him to no end when he is good.Any other time he fine other then that night at work and the bike helmet.They are the only problems.At the dog park he greeted everybody with no problems.I'm devoted to Jag.I do work up to 15hrs a day.Then come home work with Jag For a couple of hours with walking and manners.He had no training at all when we got him.I had him to a training school to by some supplies.And talked.She said i was do a good job with him for have never training a dog before.

OntarioGreys
October 5th, 2006, 08:39 AM
This is a dog you should be getting a behavioural assessment on, possibly a vet visit to see if it is a medical problem and then professional training, the risk is not only to the dog being euthanized for attacking but you could be fined and even thrown in jail if he harms someone, biting is a very serious behavioural problem and not something you should be trying to deal with on your own, The behavioural assessment will help with why he is doing it, it could be fear, dominance, confusion, stress, a mental imbalance, brain chemical imbalance or hormonal imbalance, once you understand the cause then training and possibly medications are needed inorder to resolve, and should the answer come back that the dog is mentally wired wrong then the kindest thing is the euthanize with love because the dog will always be a potential danger it is something you can not fis, and one slight mistake on your part could result in him attacking and killing, maiming or disfiguring a child.

jessi76
October 5th, 2006, 08:55 AM
When we are out walking and a bike comes by i shorten the lead and try to reasure him.

Instead of shortening up, I'd try putting him in a sit/stay and looking you in the eye. Have him focus on YOU, calmly. shortening up can make the leash tight, which can translate to anxiety - inadvertantly causing your dog to stress about bikes. (feeding his fear basically)

I comfort him when he is scared.

comforting when they are scared also feeds the fears. It's a form of praise. Instead, act like "no big deal". don't comfort the fears, instead calmly ignore and carry on like "business as usual".

It's probably worth taking some classes with Jag... reinforce manners, work on commands you have already taught, and to teach YOU how to act in situations that cause Jag stress.

dogmelissa
October 5th, 2006, 01:36 PM
Instead of shortening up, I'd try putting him in a sit/stay and looking you in the eye. Have him focus on YOU, calmly. shortening up can make the leash tight, which can translate to anxiety - inadvertantly causing your dog to stress about bikes. (feeding his fear basically)

comforting when they are scared also feeds the fears. It's a form of praise. Instead, act like "no big deal". don't comfort the fears, instead calmly ignore and carry on like "business as usual".

It's probably worth taking some classes with Jag... reinforce manners, work on commands you have already taught, and to teach YOU how to act in situations that cause Jag stress.

I agree with everything Jessi said. Having the dog focus on YOU (by looking at you) reinforces that *you* are the boss, and distracts him from the things that he is afraid of (or aggressive to). However, you can't do this only when the scary things come along. Put a word to it ("watch me" is common), and practice it in the house until he's good with it. Have a pocket full of treats at all times, and make a *huge* fuss out of him when he looks at you on the street, every time, no matter whether there's something scary there or not.
One huge training tip I got (which is hard for me to remember at times) is that if a behaviour isn't self-rewarding (ie, barking at things--the reward is barking), and you don't want the dog to do it, simply ignore it. Praise what you want them to do, ignore things you don't want them to do. If there's no reward for a certain behaviour, the dog will stop doing it.

One other important thing: dog training is only about 10% teaching the dog. The other 90% is teaching the HANDLER how to teach the dog. We're much slower learners than dogs. :p I'd *highly* recommend a basic training class--even at your local pet store (better than nothing!), which will strengthen the bond between you and Jag, teach you how to understand what he's trying to tell you, and will give you tools to help other people learn his limits. Remember that every dog has it's "personal space" and you need to educate other people about where his space is, and what the consequences of invading that space are.

Please, read the articles from the link I posted earlier. I really really really am not attacking you, I'm trying to help you understand how to help your dog. Please don't be mad (I know you think I'm attacking you, I can tell by your last post). If there was an instant fix, I'd send it to you!

As for the neighbours... if you can't educate them, then it's your job to protect Jag from them. Keep him indoors with you.

Good luck.
Melissa

angeldogs
October 6th, 2006, 03:49 AM
I put the link in my favorties file.I want training for him.i've talk to some trainers and there full till next year.I won't use petsmart.I will talk to Pet criteria next time were in there.I take Jag there every other weekend if we need things or not.When we got him if you went to feed him he would jump for the food.I now have him sitting till i so ok eat.With walking i got the body checking stopped and he just pulls now.I also have him with out having to say anything to him when walking and we stop at a corner he stops and sits.till i start walking or give the command.He's doing better with the no speak command.It's what happened at work.At the pet store he greets people in there fine.And as for the Vet i will talk to them.It's time for our stop and weigh and say hi visit so he gets used to them.And i will start the watch me.I have a pouch for the treats.I've used the clicker with the other good results i have gotten so with the watch me i will try with this also.Thanks everyone.

dogmelissa
October 6th, 2006, 02:52 PM
I put the link in my favorties file.I want training for him.i've talk to some trainers and there full till next year.I won't use petsmart.I will talk to Pet criteria next time were in there.

Though others would probably say otherwise, there isn't really anything wrong with Petsmart training. As opposed to Petcetera (is this the other one you mention?), there's really no difference. No, they're not fantastic, and likely the "trainers" have never trained dogs other than the ones they have in their home, but at least that's something.
I did basic/beginner obedience with my dog at Petsmart, and there was nothing wrong with it. They didn't have a clue what I was doing with the clicker (the class was treat-based and I couldn't find any treats Cube was motivated by so I started using the clicker), but they at least gave me basic, positive reinforcement concepts, and we've built up from there.

As long as it's training *somewhere* that is positive reinforcement, rather than corrections (and please make sure that the trainer you go to does not advocate choke, pinch, shock collar use, or is dumb enough to think that a head harness on a small dog will work--even if you don't have a small dog), it's good.

Sounds like you are on the right track, and I'm *very* glad to hear you are already using the clicker, it'll make everything else much easier to teach.

Good luck! :)
Melissa

jessi76
October 6th, 2006, 03:40 PM
or is dumb enough to think that a head harness on a small dog will work--even if you don't have a small dog

sorry for being off topic... but a good trainer knows when it's appropriate to use a head harness. (and they do work on small, med, and large dogs). if you have a puller, a head harness is a godsend.. for your own arm, and for the dog's safety. un-enjoyable walks eventuallly lead to NO walks. and that's not good for anyone... so if you need to, look into head harnesses. They can elliviate pulling, spare the dog throat damage, and make walking more enjoyable for both you & the dog.

dogmelissa
October 6th, 2006, 05:09 PM
sorry for being off topic... but a good trainer knows when it's appropriate to use a head harness. (and they do work on small, med, and large dogs). if you have a puller, a head harness is a godsend.. for your own arm, and for the dog's safety. un-enjoyable walks eventuallly lead to NO walks. and that's not good for anyone... so if you need to, look into head harnesses. They can elliviate pulling, spare the dog throat damage, and make walking more enjoyable for both you & the dog.

:sorry: But I'd disagree. Head harnesses do *not* work on small dogs, and could actually hurt them because of the angle their head is going to get pulled at if they hit the end of their leash. When I say small, I mean, 10lbs or so. They are not designed to be effective on a dog who's head is lower than your knee, the whole idea is that it will enforce dominance by exerting pressure on the *top* of their muzzle and pull their head slightly down and to the side to distract them from what they're focused on and focus on you instead. On a small dog, they force the head to the side and up in a twisting motion, a very uncomfortable, and sometimes painful position, and if a small dog was to go charging to the end of it's leash... *gulp*
Drawbacks of head harnesses: ...can be dangerous if misused (do not jerk the leash, and never use head halters with a long-line or retractable lead); may not stay on some short-nosed dogs...
Edited to add: From the Humane Society of the United States: Be sure your dog doesn't run quickly to the end of the lead; if he does, he may give himself a hard jerk. (end of edit)
If you have a small dog who pulls, there are much better options, including a harness designed for small dogs by the company who makes the most popular brand of head harnesses (I just found out about this!) http://www.premier.com/pages.cfm?ID=75 This works the same way as a head harness but redirects the whole *body* rather than the head. With a small dog (of which I have!), I'd feel a lot better about this kind of harness, knowing that it can't snap the dog's neck if he goes psycho for something, goes at a full gallop and hits the end of his leash, snapping his neck around. I've seen my dog do it with a regular collar, and when he hit the end of the line he completely turned upside down (in the air!), crashed down on his back and cried at the impact. If he'd had a head harness on, he probably would have broke his neck!

I guess the head-harness on a small dog is just my OPINION. I've seen too many trainers that put them on small dogs, and even when the guardian was properly trained, they just weren't effective. I will look into this other harness, though, because I've never seen one and now I'm intrigued.

Like food, training methods are really up to the person responsible for the dog. I, personally, wouldn't take my small dog to a trainer who advocates head harnesses for small dogs. If I had a big dog, I probably wouldn't see a problem with that. Each person is entitled to their choices. I just think that trainers should have a big enough repertoire of tools to be able to cope with dogs of all shapes and sizes. Would the head-harness trainer still insist on putting a head-harness on your bulldog, or would they maybe try something else?? That's all I'm suggesting a person should ask.

Melissa

jessi76
October 6th, 2006, 08:13 PM
just so you know, the poster's dog isn't 10lbs, or a "small" dog. (so I really don't know why all the small dog info was posted) if you are walking a dog that runs full gallop to the end of it's leash, there are bigger issues than a head harness can help control. Any harness (be it a head or body) is a tool. There is always a time, place, and proper manner to use any tool. I know about the EASY WALK, I own one. I used it on my dog while he was just a puppy.

The OP's dog is medium sized (angeldogs, please correct me if I'm wrong), if pulling is an issue, a head harness is the way to go, not the easy walk. (in conjunction w/ training, of course)

angeldogs
October 7th, 2006, 01:41 AM
we tried the the gentle leader that a so called trainer put on jag and the first day it it rubbed it raw.We did what the told us to do and what the book said.Jag is scared of it.I hate it.I bought a harness called the sense-able harness.The lead hooks to the top of the front ring.Best 50.00 dollars i ever spent.Jag can still pull but not with full strenght.It makes him feel like he is going to loose his balance and doesn't pull as hard.Also when he goes for the full out run he stops just before the lead completely tightens.He loves the harness. here is what the head collar did.

angeldogs
October 7th, 2006, 01:46 AM
I like the harness.And Jag was 70lbs last weigh in at 15months old.Also i read in the Dog whisperer book.You have to watch with the head collar to allow enough head movement for when dogs greet and communicate.And my harness put no pressure on Jags neck.

angeldogs
October 9th, 2006, 04:50 AM
i was just rerreading the thread.I would like to thank all of you who responded to the question.i know my comment about the kid next store and giving Jag a steak if he bit him.Was out of line.i would not let that happen in anyway.I know the comment upset and made some of you mad.I was just tring to add some humor to my situation. Which was wrong.And not thinking about that when typing.And i have been using your advice.And practicing it.I just wanted to say sorry.And also thank you all for the advice.I really do need your help.The other family dogs were trained with the basics when we got them.I just feel i owe an appolige for that comment which will never happen again.:sorry:.

chico2
October 9th, 2006, 08:26 AM
Angeldogs,I know next to nothing about training dogs,just wanted to say :sorry: for the trouble you are having with Jag,he is such a beautiful dog.
I also understand your comment about the neighbors kid,I understand your feeling,I too once had a little monster living next door.
His form of entertainment was killing birds with a bee-bee gun
I know I wished this kid would dissappear on many occasions,we know you are not serious.
If Jag was my dog,I would do everything I could to not give your neighbors a chance to tease Jag,a dog alone in the backyard is a target for all kinds of evil things,including poisoning.
The Cocker I walk every day,have a"thing"about bike-helmets,people carrying large items,people on skateboards,she'll growl and try to lunge at them,but she's a small dog and otherwise very friendly,so the owners don't think it's a problem.
Good Luck with Jag!

Prin
October 10th, 2006, 12:23 AM
It's ok.. You just have to learn to write (sarcasm) after comments like that.:D

Weims are hard. I don't remember if you've had one already, but if you haven't, talk to an experienced weim person. They're hard. :D They're smart, stubborn and high energy. It's a frustrating combination, but they're so beautiful that people forget that once in a while.

We think Boo is mixed with weim, or at least GSP. Put him with a Weim, and the two go off in their own little world full of adventure and mischief. :evil:

With Boo, we've had to lay down the law for 4.5 years straight. Sure, it's much easier now than before, but I still find myself disciplining him and re-training him so, so, so much more often than I have to for Jemma. Boo really does know the rules and what he's supposed to be doing, but he'll be looking at you while breaking the rules and doing what he's NOT supposed to be doing (I'm told that's a signature Weim move, although I know a few other doggies who do it too). So we just keep reinforcing and reinforcing.

I love him, but he's a handful.:love: :frustrated: :cloud9: :yell: :D

angeldogs
October 11th, 2006, 06:22 AM
That's Jag breaking the rules well looking at you.And were both stubborn:D .I love his high energy.I used to live in the gym at one time and had to stop do to work hours and missed that and with the running and the up to 2 hour walk each morning.I don't need the gym.I have Jag:thumbs up

carolegill
October 11th, 2006, 07:06 AM
My dog actually crossed our street to bite a postman! Luckily, she didn't break the skin. She's a 3 year old Parson Russell Terrier and she's become too aggressive.
We have a new puppy, same bread and she's wonderful with him. He hangs off her neck and everything and she's so patient.
It's a thing she has about Postman.
Does anyone on here at all have any advice for me?
I would be so grateful.
I am brand new to this and didn't see how I could start a new post.
HELP!
carolegill

Prin
October 11th, 2006, 12:40 PM
Mailmen get bitten all the time. They're intruders on the dogs' territory. My old mailman in the city would bring cookies for my doggies so they'd like him...

I love his high energyThat's great! I think that's a major reason a lot of weims are rehomed, so if you love that about him, he's got more than a chance.:D

angeldogs
October 12th, 2006, 12:19 AM
That he does have more than a chance.:thumbs up .He's my boy.

LM1313
October 12th, 2006, 01:04 AM
My dog actually crossed our street to bite a postman! Luckily, she didn't break the skin. She's a 3 year old Parson Russell Terrier and she's become too aggressive.
We have a new puppy, same bread and she's wonderful with him. He hangs off her neck and everything and she's so patient.
It's a thing she has about Postman.
Does anyone on here at all have any advice for me?
I would be so grateful.
I am brand new to this and didn't see how I could start a new post.
HELP!
carolegill

Did your dog escape your yard or is it allowed to run free?

If it's allowed to run free . . . put it in a fenced yard or the house except when on a leash. :)

angeldogs
October 13th, 2006, 04:21 AM
I talked to a obedience trainer yesturday about Jag and she thinks privite lessons would be better in the begining.And she will give them to me for the same price as the class.So he starts on Sunday.And if he needs more i will wait till the new year to go to the one i wanted to see.The bonus for me if i can take her class is she also has a weim.At least he starts training anyway.:thumbs up

Prin
October 13th, 2006, 02:23 PM
yey! Good luck! :)

angeldogs
October 15th, 2006, 02:13 PM
Thanks for the luck Prin.Well first session on training done.She works with aggressive dogs.And said Jag is not aggressive.Say's Jag thinks he's a egual and is trying to be the alfa.And that's why he was the way he was the night i took him to where i work.Show them he was the Alfa.If we would have let things go any longer it would have turned agressive.Now with the Pitbull ban.She say's kitchener is also going to start with Rotties.Dobies.And any other dog that shows Aggression will be baned.