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question about petfinder

jiorji
September 27th, 2006, 07:37 PM
i was randomly looking at adoption policies for some of the shelters listed on petfinder. Many say they do a home check. WHat if you're out of their state/province? Do these places "mail" the dog? Or does the adopter have to go pick it up?

I never quite understood how that worked out..so if anyone knows...

Puppyluv
September 27th, 2006, 07:40 PM
Sometimes the rescue will contact someone that they know, or someone in another rescue near the adopter to do the home check. When it comes to getting the doggy, there are a couple of ways, the adopter can drive the whole way there and back, the rescue could do the drive (unlikely), the two could meet in the middle, or they start doing a driver search/recruit, sort of an "underground railroad" idea, where a couple of people do part of the drive.

jessi76
September 27th, 2006, 07:48 PM
or you get turned down, which happened to me. The first dog I applied for on petfinder was in another state (which I was willing to drive to)... and I learned that particular shelter didn't do "out of state" adoptions for that reason. It was impossible to do a home check, so we were turned down.

The dog I ended up getting was from a shelter in my state, which said they DO do home checks, but after speaking to my references & my vet, deemed the home check unnecessary, and approved us.

Puppyluv
September 27th, 2006, 07:56 PM
LOL Jessi, or that! I "got out" of the homecheck too, they deemed it unnecessary and gave me the pooch.

we3beagles
September 27th, 2006, 08:23 PM
Got out of it as well. Since we already had 2 beagles they figured we knew what we were getting into and after a vet reference we were lucky enough to get Callie. Soozie we called them and said "we're keeping her, she's been through 3 homes and no one can handle her" and they said "Thank god". We started a Calgary chapter to facilitate out of province adoptions, but if we don't have someone in the area of the adoptive family we do it all by phone, email and vet reference.

jiorji
September 27th, 2006, 08:25 PM
what's the homecheck about?
what do they ask the vet? I don't think my vet remembers me enough to say "umm yes she's a lovely girl" lol

OntarioGreys
September 27th, 2006, 08:53 PM
Maya is from Florida, a greyhound adoption group here did the home check and placement, should something happen to me where I cannot for some reason keep her the adoption group here will take responsibility for her. Many groups do not do long distance adoptions because they want to ensure that if things do not work out the dog does not end up being dumped in a shelter or pound. Some will, if they know there is a backup group that will take responsibility for the dog should things not work out.

Maya was delivered to Buffalo NY as they had other greyhound they were delivering to other groups is Northern US and Canada using a greyhound Hauler.
http://www.mypetpages.net/artists/1731/0/d68066cde67468a1a405fce88a47c4ed.JPG
If I had wanted to adopt from a different adoption group in Florida I would have had to make the trip to Florida to meet with them and pick up.

Some people recieve greyhounds up here using the underground railroad method, in which volunteers who live along the route offer to drive legs of the journeys to get the dog to their new home, for extremely shy dogs this is not a good method as there is too many opportunities for escape when being transferred from one vehicle to another.
I have participated in one where I brought a recued Pitbull mix that my son adopted and 3 beagles to a beagle rescue in Toronto from Ohio

In some parts of the US private aircraft pilots offer flights to transport pets

http://www.wingsforgreyhounds.org/info.html

http://www.flyingpaws.org/Flying%20Paws%20Overview.htm

Frenchy
September 27th, 2006, 09:16 PM
what's the homecheck about?
what do they ask the vet? I don't think my vet remembers me enough to say "umm yes she's a lovely girl" lol
It depends of the rescue,it depends of what "feeling" they're going to get from you.We get a lot of people from Ontario adopting our dogs.We have volunteers in Ontario that are able to do home visits if we ask them to.And for the vet's reference,I don't think they will ask your vet if your a nice girl or not,they will check if you bring your animals for anual check ups and basicly,if you take good care of your animals.

OntarioGreys
September 27th, 2006, 09:25 PM
what's the homecheck about?
what do they ask the vet? I don't think my vet remembers me enough to say "umm yes she's a lovely girl" lol


Home checks are about meeting you and your family often a dog is brought along to see how families members reaction to it, it can tell them if the children know how to behave around the dog, do the parent supervise/ correct the children around the dog for example the child is pulling on the dogs ear and the parent does nothing, do all families have an interest in a dog. It also helps to point out potential dangers eg, open pool the dog could fall into, fenced around yard in disrepair, items around yard the dog could injure themselves on, chemicals or meds laying out where a curious dog could get into, it allows volunteers to meet other pets to see if the potential dog is compatible with, or is their pets kept outdoors chained up. One home that was turned down in a home visits had all sorts of garbage and small items just thrown on the floor all through the house which could be a choking hazard if a dog was placed there. A home visit is not about checking your house keeping skills they do not care about sustbunnies only that the home is safe for the dog and that all family member do want the dog. another example the husband wants the dog but the wife is getting paranoid about dog hair that the visiting dog has put on the couch as it walked by, chances are a dog placed there will get demoted to living outside, or one of the family member are terrified of the visiting dog or wants no part of being involved with the visit.


As for checking with a vet, it is information that can be found in your pets file, they want to know if you provide proper medical care, are your current pets vacccinated, do you spay and neuter, are they kept on heartworm meds, does the vet suspect neglect or abuse.

jiorji
September 27th, 2006, 10:07 PM
A home visit is not about checking your house keeping skills they do not care about sustbunnies only that the home is safe for the dog and that all family member do want the dog. .

i'd be worried they think the space is too small.

Prin
September 27th, 2006, 10:10 PM
I think they would.:o

Puppyluv
September 27th, 2006, 10:12 PM
How big is your place Jiorji? my place is pretty damn small, but they weren't concerned. They trusted that I was being honest in my commitment to exercising her, and really, dogs don't need that much space.

jiorji
September 27th, 2006, 10:21 PM
2 1/2... :sad:

Puppyluv
September 27th, 2006, 10:25 PM
sqft??????(added all those ??? to make the min 10 letters, but then this adendum just fixed that prob anyways)

jiorji
September 27th, 2006, 10:49 PM
i have no idea how many sq ft. It's pretty small though, which is why i'm looking for another one next year

BMDLuver
September 28th, 2006, 07:54 AM
So then you have a kitchen/living room, a bedroom and a bathroom. What's the difference between that say and someone who has a honking big house but confines the dog to the laundry room when they are out? What matters is your exercise plan, ability to care for a pet, etc.. You should not be judged on whether you live in a small apartment or a huge house. Bet the dog gets more exercise and stimulation from someone living in an apartment versus living in a house. JMHO.

jiorji
September 28th, 2006, 10:23 AM
well he would but we all know some shelters are 100% set on only letting people with a yard adopt big dogs

OntarioGreys
September 28th, 2006, 11:59 AM
well he would but we all know some shelters are 100% set on only letting people with a yard adopt big dogs each shelter and group has their own adoption policies, reasons other than no yard some won't adopt, some will not adopt to those in the armed forces(because they found they had top many returns due to relocations) some will not adopt to any home where there is young children could be 7 and under or 5 and under, some will not adopt to those that work fulltime where the dog wil be alone more than 4 or 6 hours. Even I was turned down by one group when I offered to be a volunteer foster home, because the did not like my work hours
Some groups are litle wiser and look at the individual dog and it's needs, not every big dog is suited to an apartment life but then there are lots that are, and it is not just exercise levels that play a role in deciding, it could be determined a particular dog is simply just too vocal, likes to bark and howl, that dog would also not be good in an apartment,


When I was working with the one greyhound adoption group, a yard was not a requirement, size of your place did not matter, 3 80 lb greyhounds in a one bedroom apartment is not unheard of, but they look at the individual dog if it was pretty settled and laidback then apartment life with walks was sufficient to keep that dog happy, if the dog was more active and needed to let off steam with a good runs, we would look for a home with a yard for it. One of my fosters went to live in a small downtown Toronto apartment, so I had to teach the dogs stairs and took it downtown to walk around malls or the farmers market so it could get used to the things that he would faces in his new home life, like crowds and traffic or in other cases the dog needs to get used to riding in elevators, the home visit also plays a role in knowing what skills the dog will need in it's new and then the foster parents can prepare the dog by teaching it the needed skills.


If your application is turned down, don't be afraid to ask why especially if you are asking about a particular dog, don't assume it was because you live in an apartment, it may simply be that particular dog was not suited to apartment life and they may have another dog available that may be better suited. If you are looking for a certain breed don't limit yourself to just petfinder, a lot of rescues simply do not use petfinder for listing available dogs, you may need to do a google search to locate rescues near you

mastifflover
September 28th, 2006, 12:34 PM
I got out of the first home visit they were satisfied with my references and my vets letter. Jake came from Michigan and the rescue had someone travelling up here so they delivered him to a breeder who works with the rescue and I met him there. Boo was from a so called rescue that was only interested in money so they approved me without a phone call or a homecheck. Thanks to the great people here and throughout the Mastiff and Mossler world we got this person shut down. Luckily she has not reared her ugly head again. But every rescue is run differently some will not even talk to you if you do not have a fence and others base each adoption on the individuals. Big dogs really require very little space since they do not run around they are to busy guarding the bed or the couch.

mafiaprincess
September 30th, 2006, 06:48 PM
i was randomly looking at adoption policies for some of the shelters listed on petfinder. Many say they do a home check

Sadly, of the ones I've looked at at least semi seriously, many state in large letters they don't adopt as far as I am like NY to me in Ontario..
And one I was looking at the other day said they did.. but the onus was on you to see if you could get a rescue to do a home check. Think it was better if they were helping you to make the arrangements.. Seems more like they don't care as much to adopting out of the area.