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Why are little dogs carried ?

erykah1310
September 11th, 2006, 08:12 PM
Today I noticed alot of people carrying their toy dogs while out on walks. Not like they are far walks, I watched one lady leave her house with her dog and walk to the end of the street and back.
:shrug:

So as my title says, why do SOME people think their little dogs have to be carried everywhere. Not puppies either, i mean Shih Tzu's and Toy Poodles????

Rather confused on the concept of this " walk"
Some one clear it up for me

phoenix
September 11th, 2006, 08:51 PM
Because accessories are meant to be close to the face?

susieqt
September 11th, 2006, 08:55 PM
When I walk my dogs, I always end up carrying my little one on our way back; she can't walk as far as my big Stanley and she enjoys the ride from up high!:)
But I know what you mean about little dogs being carried all the time, they do need exercise as much as big dogs.

Puppyluv
September 11th, 2006, 08:59 PM
It's kind of a pet peeve for me..... especially when the little dog up in arms is barking like crazy at my dog and I, and the owner glares at me like "how dare you have a dog so large!" (Ha... 37 lbs.... HUGE!!!!). Maybe it's more of an "evereyone needs to see my beautiful dog so I will carry it around at face level".

erykah1310
September 11th, 2006, 09:02 PM
I can see it becoming a pet peeve of mine as well.
I understand if they are tired and your walks have to be long ( larger dog along with you)
But dont these small dogs suffer in the end??? Carried all the time, no muscle maintenance????

Maya
September 11th, 2006, 11:07 PM
Rather confused on the concept of this " walk"
Some one clear it up for me Does this clear it up? :D
http://felinefantasies.com/puppypurse_carriers.html

normag
September 11th, 2006, 11:17 PM
When I first got Shani Murphy was a year old, so I got a doggie carrier. we went on our walk and I carried shani in the carrier, then when we got close to home I put her down and let her walk the rest of the way home. Once she could do the walk fine, but I let her decide when she was ready.

Jackie467
September 11th, 2006, 11:25 PM
I will carry candi sometimes. Like for instance I keep her leashes in the garage and when I go get the mail I go out the front door. She will come to the door and try to go out with me. I don't want her to get hit by a car or anything so I'll carry her to the mailbox and back. Sometimes I will also carry her when there are small children around because children make her nervous and most parents now a days don't teach their kids the proper way to approch a dog so I worry the kid will just run up and try to grab her which will freak her out and make her more afraid of children then she already is. Sometimes I'll carry her when she gets overstimulated and starts to have problems listening, I'll carry her a few feet to calm her and then when I let her down again she seems to get the point and will walk more calmly.

Cinnabear
September 12th, 2006, 12:58 AM
Because they're snuggly. People have different ways of caring for their dogs, and if they want to lift them to carry than so be it. That is one of the reasons to some people is that they want a small dog to carry and cuddle.

Puppyluv
September 12th, 2006, 05:48 AM
Because they're snuggly. People have different ways of caring for their dogs, and if they want to lift them to carry than so be it. That is one of the reasons to some people is that they want a small dog to carry and cuddle.
Yeah but it can give them a massive superiority complex. They are all of a sudden the biggest dog in the world, when really, the come noewhere close. My dog's snuggly, I'm strong enough to carry her long distances, yet I don't pick her up and carry her places. Why? Because it messes up her relations to me, other people and other dogs.

Joey.E.CockersMommy
September 12th, 2006, 08:51 AM
I will carry Joey if hes getting tired on our walks sometimes, but I wont just carry him for the sake of carrying him. He's a little to big to be a purse dog. :D

technodoll
September 12th, 2006, 09:26 AM
or worse, those over-protective dog owners who see you coming with your normal-sized dog, and then in a panic scoop up their little one and hide them in their jacket :eek: i always just smile sweetly and say "hey it's ok, they already had breakfast"... most of the time it makes those scared folks relax and smile :) but sometimes i just get a snarky look :shrug:

if small dogs are never given the chance to interact and socialize with other dogs, humans, etc in a normal way, or walk and exercise near the ground where all those interesting smells and sights are... it's harder for them to grow up to be well-adjusted IMO. you create fearful or shy dogs, or worse, ones with a superiority complex who think it's ok to yap and snarl at everything and everyone "because they can". those owners are NOT doing their dogs a favor. if you want something cute and snuggly to carry around... get a teddy bear! :dog:

rainbow
September 12th, 2006, 12:37 PM
The only way I can understand it is if you have a larger dog that you are walking at the same time and the little one gets tired. But then I also can't understand why someone would have two mismatched dogs.

Jackie467
September 12th, 2006, 03:29 PM
They are all of a sudden the biggest dog in the world
In my experience most small dogs will believe this and it is not from being carried or babied, and generally they only feel like big dogs in certain situations. Just as my mothers 65 lbs dog thinks it's tiny and can sit in your lap without a problem, it's not because he was ignored or not petted or babied enough, that is just the way many dogs are. Yet when another male is around suddenly he is the biggest dog in the world.
your normal-sized dog
Why are only larger dogs normal sized. I think my Candi is just how she is suposed to be and is "normal sized" to me.
But then I also can't understand why someone would have two mismatched dogs.
I have two mismatched dogs. I have an IG (12 lbs) and another dog who I will have living with me in oct. that is a pit akita X and weighs about 65 lbs. I have the two because I love the IG breed but I also love the temperment of my Rocko (pit akita X). I don't really have any problems with the two of them together. I like having varity and plus I didn't pick Rocko, he picked me, same with Candi so that is how it ended up.

papillonmama
September 12th, 2006, 04:11 PM
I don't carry Dory, but she does jump into the bottom of the stroller because sometimes she gets scared. That doesn't happen very often though, so she walks most of the time. :pawprint:

Puppyluv
September 12th, 2006, 04:14 PM
I don't carry Dory, but she does jump into the bottom of the stroller because sometimes she gets scared. That doesn't happen very often though, so she walks most of the time. :pawprint:

See I think that is a million times better than carrying the dog. They're still at "dog-level" they just feel safer:thumbs up

Frenchy
September 12th, 2006, 07:10 PM
Yeah but it can give them a massive superiority complex. They are all of a sudden the biggest dog in the world, when really, the come noewhere close. My dog's snuggly, I'm strong enough to carry her long distances, yet I don't pick her up and carry her places. Why? Because it messes up her relations to me, other people and other dogs.
Exactly ! My friend has a miniature poodle.She always has him on her knees when she sits down and that bugs me.One time at MY house,Sam and Bailey wanted to go and see her,say hi,the little guy started to growl at them and almost bit them.She said "no no" to MY dogs! I told her it was her dog that had a problem.Maybe that's why she doesn't come around anymore?:rolleyes: And some other time when I was leaving her house,her bf had the dog in his arm and came to kiss me goodbye,the dog almost jumped in my face,he had to put the dog on the floor...I told them to be careful.Dogs are not purses.

Shaykeija
September 12th, 2006, 10:44 PM
The only time I carry my dogs is.....When it is too cold outside. Missie will actually fall over. I put her in my coat and bring her inside. I carry Tyra down the stairs because her legs are so short she tumbles down them. Ow-wee.

BoxerMom
September 12th, 2006, 10:50 PM
Some people see their pets as 'fashion'....:mad:

greaterdane
September 12th, 2006, 10:52 PM
I'm the odd man out. My little 3 pounders love to walk on their own. If I am out...they are on 4 feet walking with me. People think its hilarious when the chihuahua is out in front and the dane is trailing behind. They are just little balls of energy.

ChancesMom
September 13th, 2006, 02:26 AM
The only way I can understand it is if you have a larger dog that you are walking at the same time and the little one gets tired. But then I also can't understand why someone would have two mismatched dogs.

This just made me laugh because I have an old friend who raises and shows Great Danes and her hubby has a Chihuaha... I am not sure that you can get more mismatched than that! heeheehaha!

Sariss
September 13th, 2006, 07:35 AM
I try to make my Chihuahuas walk for most of the walk, but there are two reasons they may be carried:
1) If the big dog (Daisy) is with us, we go for longer walks, and they cannot walk as far (since Daisy usually goes for 2-4 hour walks)
2) If it is busy, they are carried because they have been stepped on before and with them being so small, it could be the death of them

kimglenwood
October 13th, 2006, 06:59 PM
I carry my pom all around town when doing errands and I see everyone looking at me when she is in her front facing backpack, but she hates staying alone in the car and loves the attention she gets from the real animal lovers. When I am am walking by our home in the country she walks until she sits and won't go farther or if we see any other animals approaching that would harm her, but I cannot let her walk around town, someone may step on her and hurt her or pour something on her and god knows what kinds of edibles are on the city sidewalks,LOL, I am getting two baby chis soon and they will be carried everywhere unless I am sure it is safe and they are not too tired! There is so much danger for little dogs on the ground compared to in your arms or in a carrier. Not all people treat their tiny dogs like accessories, some of us just love the big hearts that those little guys have to share with us.

meb999
October 13th, 2006, 08:07 PM
there are quite a few toy dogs in my neighborhood. People ALWAYs pick up their dog when they see me walking Buster. And their dogs are always barking their little heads off, and Buster is calmly walking next to me....and then I get the dirty looks ?!! :shrug:

One day I'll pick Buster up at the same time as they pick their little toy dog up, and give THEM the dirty look!!!

Puppyluv
October 13th, 2006, 08:40 PM
there are quite a few toy dogs in my neighborhood. People ALWAYs pick up their dog when they see me walking Buster. And their dogs are always barking their little heads off, and Buster is calmly walking next to me....and then I get the dirty looks ?!! :shrug:

One day I'll pick Buster up at the same time as they pick their little toy dog up, and give THEM the dirty look!!!
I'm with you Meb! I get a tonne of those, because on my way to the park, I pass by a building in which at least ten of the residents own a small white fluffy dog, weighing under 10 lbs, with the vocal cords of an opera singer. I get yelled at to take "that thing" to the other side walk across the street. As they pick their dogs up and glare at me.:rolleyes: And Layla's just 35lbs!!!

but I cannot let her walk around town, someone may step on her and hurt her or pour something on her and god knows what kinds of edibles are on the city sidewalks.

Little dogs are no more likely to have stuff poured on them than big dogs, and it's not like big dogs don't smell stuff on the ground they want to eat. The "trick" is to train them not to eat it, not to pick them up and carry them.

Prin
October 13th, 2006, 09:50 PM
See the difference is, we listen to and respond to our dogs' needs in a different way.

If Boo's feet get frozen and he falls over (which has happened), I can't pick him up, so I warm up his feets one by one and then we run home. But there's no doubt in his mind that he's walking home, because I never gave him any other option.

Also, I know his limits pretty well. If it's -20, we can't walk far, so we stay close to home. I would imagine that for a smaller dog, the distance is even shorter.

And when a dog who is too heavy to lift gets tired on a walk, you just wet him/give him water and keep on trucking.

While I don't see a problem with carrying your dog in an emergency, doing it outside of an emergency, IMO, will lead to a dog who just stops and lies down, because he/she knows there's another (easier) option than making the trip home on his/her feet.

erykah1310
October 13th, 2006, 10:23 PM
One day I'll pick Buster up at the same time as they pick their little toy dog up, and give THEM the dirty look!!!

Thats the best meb!!! I should do that with Kita too, cause all too often the small dog peeps pick their pooches up and mutter bout pitbulls as I walk by ( while getting the dirty looks)

Im so gonna pick Kita up one day too! Great idea!

technodoll
October 13th, 2006, 10:34 PM
i just make a joke of it all... smile at the "small dog picker-uppers" and say "don't worry, they already had lunch" :D most of the time i get a smile back, or a giggle... it's better than dealing with the aggravation IMO :shrug:

Prin
October 13th, 2006, 10:44 PM
I say, "Thanks. My doggies are really terrified of the little ones."
(it's funny because it's true)

kimglenwood
October 14th, 2006, 11:53 AM
Look obviously there is a huge difference to owning bigger dogs and small toy dogs, I just put down a pitbull and a german shepard this summer due to old age and I never had a problem with someone picking up their small dog when they'd see us coming, my dogs were very gentle but as we all know there are poor owners out there and they can't all be trusted around small dogs. Now that I have small ones I see completely how different things can be, and puppyluv, bigger dogs have much easier time eating anything mostly while my little dogs are special needs and on meds and training them to not eat a hodog on the road is dam near impossible unless you want to be mean to them which I don't. I say you guys who have big dogs now keep doing what you want and we'll "carry" on the way we want, my dog gets lots of exercise in plenty of ways, she doesn't need to be down on the ground in a busy sidewalk. I though this website was a forum for tolerance and support...whats going on here guys??? Carrying a small dog when the owner thinks its unsafe is neither abusive or hard to understand.

Puppyluv
October 14th, 2006, 12:01 PM
puppyluv, bigger dogs have much easier time eating anything mostly while my little dogs are special needs and on meds and training them to not eat a hodog on the road is dam near impossible unless you want to be mean to them which I don't.

I lived with small dogs for a year, when I lived with my aunt and uncle, and there is no reason why it should be more difficult to train a small dog to "leave it" than a large dog. All dogs have relatively similar mental capacities (yes there are 'smarter' breeds, but on the level of basic training, with patience, any dog can be taught leave it). The problem is, some small dog owners feel that instead of actually taking the time to train their dog, they take the easy way out, one of which is simply picking the dog up when something comes along.

phoenix
October 14th, 2006, 12:23 PM
kimgw, the thing is that when you pick up your dog in face of a bigger dog, you give it a superiority complex. It doesn't learn how to handle meeting another dog well; instead it starts to think that it is dominant (it may well be... but there is real 'dog language' that should be sorting through that, not you putting it higher up than the other dog). So what ends up happening, is the little dog mouths off to the larger dog because it is feeling secure, and the larger dog starts to feel challenged. This can end nastily.

Another thing is that I think that carrying a dog like an accessory is usually (and maybe not in your case) a sad cry for attention. When the attention stops, then the dog is often cast off for something cuter, littler, etc.

When small dogs are permitted their independence, they handle larger dogs and other situations very well.

PetFriendly
October 14th, 2006, 01:16 PM
I lived with small dogs for a year, when I lived with my aunt and uncle, and there is no reason why it should be more difficult to train a small dog to "leave it" than a large dog. All dogs have relatively similar mental capacities (yes there are 'smarter' breeds, but on the level of basic training, with patience, any dog can be taught leave it). The problem is, some small dog owners feel that instead of actually taking the time to train their dog, they take the easy way out, one of which is simply picking the dog up when something comes along.

For the most part, yes its just as easy to train a small dog as it is a large dog. But in the case if leave it, its a little harder since the human has less time to react because the dog's head is already closer to the ground... Same thing with teaching a little dog to heal, even on a short leash, the dog is still at least 24 inches away from you (more if you're tall) so you don't have the same controle as you would have walking a lab who's collar is closer to your hand.

That said, small dog owners often tend to be lazy dog owners, they will pick up a dog instead of teaching it to walk nicely on a leash, teach it to use papers instead of taking it out, etc... While my little dog is somewhat of a fashion accessory (I make clothes for him) that's about where it ends. He walks on his own 4 feet, works to earn his keep, has gone all the way to advanced obedience, is enrolled in agility and visits at a seniors home (when the poeple are outside for now).

doggy lover
October 14th, 2006, 03:43 PM
the other day I seen a lady with her dog all wrapped up in a blanket, come on now its not that cold and he does have a fur coat. I don't mind so much when they carry them if the dog has already had a run, my biggest peeve is when you go near them to say what a nice dog and they try to take off your head.:eek:

Prin
October 14th, 2006, 06:46 PM
For the most part, yes its just as easy to train a small dog as it is a large dog. But in the case if leave it, its a little harder since the human has less time to react because the dog's head is already closer to the ground... Same thing with teaching a little dog to heal, even on a short leash, the dog is still at least 24 inches away from you (more if you're tall) so you don't have the same controle as you would have walking a lab who's collar is closer to your hand. Having a collar closer to your hand doesn't change anything because both dogs are still on a 2 metre leash and if anything, the bigger dog will have a longer leash because less of the length is used up between you and the dog vertically.

And for the not reacting in time because the head is so low to the ground- regardless of the dog's height, most of them will have their noses to the ground anyway (if not trained to walk properly), so there really isn't a difference there either.

A leash correction is a leash correction, regardless of the height of the dog.

And just to prove that- my man has only been around our big dogs and his friends' big dogs, and one day he was working outside, and a woman was standing there yelling at their crew with a little dog in tow. While she was moaning, her dog picked up a rubber insert from a bottle cap and started choking on it. My man was able to run over and dig that cap thing out of its throat before it died. Had that been a bigger dog, that little thing would have been long gone and lodged somewhere else. Regardless, my man reacted the SAME way he would have reacted had it been a big dog choking.

You see my point? It seems people have resorted to saying "well, your size dog is easier to train for this or that" and NO, they aren't. Big dogs and little dogs are just that: DOGS. Dogs are dogs. It's not like training cats vs dogs here. Everybody has their own issues with their own dogs, and IMO, size should not matter for most of it, including training them to walk properly on a leash.

kimglenwood
October 14th, 2006, 08:12 PM
Since my pom has hydrocephalus and now the new little man coming has too, I :pray: think that not all dogs are as easily trained as others no matter what size they are and since my dogs are all special needs dogs I will continue to carry them at any time that I am feeling they could get into trouble and no, they are not accessories, they are my best friends and will never be something that I want to get attention since they all have open fontanels the less attention the better and I love all dogs large medium or small. But as you know hydro doggies can be a lot slower and need extra care, I was merely explaining why I carry MY dogs, and possibly some other owners feel the same as me. There is irresonsible owners of all size dogs, people use little dogs to accessorize and worse and big dogs are abused too. I am sure you are all great dog owners or you wouldn't take the time to write on this site, but there are many people with large dogs that will hurt or kill small dogs and in this case, if a large dog is coming that they don't know they should be picked up, my little dog plays with our neighbors doberman and dalmation with no problems but I trust them because I know them. So she is not afraid of big dogs. Lets mellow out a little and see there are reasonable arguments that in some instances carrying a litIle dog is more then acceptable.

PetFriendly
October 14th, 2006, 08:57 PM
A leash correction is a leash correction, regardless of the height of the dog.


Point taken, dogs are dogs, they are all trainable, some more easily than others granted, but its possible for all of them.

In some cases though, leash corrections are not a training option, weak tracheas and all.

I didn't say you can't teach a small dog, only that its harder and probably takes more time. And I'm sorry, but it has to be easier to teach a dog to heel when you need less than 12" of leash to reach them, the control is just better. IMHO

PetFriendly
October 14th, 2006, 09:02 PM
Lets mellow out a little and see there are reasonable arguments that in some instances carrying a litIle dog is more then acceptable.

If the situation is such that the dog is not safe on the ground, it shouldn't be with you.

Prin
October 14th, 2006, 10:43 PM
I didn't say you can't teach a small dog, only that its harder and probably takes more time. And I'm sorry, but it has to be easier to teach a dog to heel when you need less than 12" of leash to reach them, the control is just better. IMHO
Really? It's easier to control a 100lbs at the end of a rope than 5 lbs? That's news to me.

Every size of dog has its pros and cons. Like I said above, neither is easier than the other. Why does this have to be a contest?!

technodoll
October 14th, 2006, 11:17 PM
i think... more people train big dogs to walk properly on a leash because heck, physical injuries hurt more when struggling to restrain a 60, 100, or 150 lbs dog VS a 10 lbs one... the little dogs can pull and chug along and it doesn't rip your shoulder out of the socket :frustrated:

but i have seen tiny dogs perfectly well-behaved, well-trained and an example to ALL owners that size doesn't matter when training a dog, you just need to use different methods & tools that adapt to the dog's size and personality.

on the subject of picking up small dogs... sure, on occasion it's totally acceptable IMO. If the dog is "special needs" or injured. If you're in a shop that doesn't really "allow pets, but...". In times of deep puddles or slush or mounds of soft snow that the dog just cannot get through. When the dog is exhausted after a long and strenuous walk. In a crowd of boistrous drunk people falling all over the place. Besides that... :shrug: nope.

Prin
October 14th, 2006, 11:29 PM
And I don't get it. If big dogs are sooooo much easier, then why do people have little dogs at all? Wouldn't we all take easy street and get good-walking, no crap-eating, easy to train, perfect big dogs?:confused:

Puppyluv
October 14th, 2006, 11:33 PM
If your dog, big or small, has tracheal problems, it should not be on a neck collar, especially if it hasn't learned to walk properly. Put it in an easyway, and there should be no excuse not to provide leash corrections.
I agree with Prin. If there is a reason why the dog is not safe on the ground, the dog shouldn't have been brought there in the first place.

Amy's Mom
October 15th, 2006, 09:29 AM
Don't quite know what to say here except - when I take Amy (minature poodle) out for a walk she walks; the exception is when we are shopping or in town near lots of people and noise and traffic (foot and vehicle) I will sometimes pick her up. I know that as a rescue we have to teach her that noise and people are okay. I also don't like leaving her in the car for more than a few minutes so she quite often comes with me into the stores in her carrier.
Like I said, most of the time she walks. That said though, she loves to greet other dogs whether they are big or small. that is part of the fun of going for our walks.

I think that people should be able to carry their dogs if they think it is necessary.

Jackie467
October 15th, 2006, 10:39 AM
I'm sorry but I do have to say this. I'v had dobermans all my life and now for the first time have a small dog (had her two years now). And I'm sorry but I never had so much trouble training the dobies like I do with my Candi. She is trained well NOW but it took much longer and more difficult steps to get her where she is than what it took to get ANY of my dobies there, and in the IG club I belong to all of the dogs there took about as long as she did. Leash walking is easier of course because she is smaller, however training her to walk correctly was much more difficult than with the dobies. Plus it is harder to house break a small dog than most large breeds. I think this is because they are so low to the ground that sometimes you can't tell they're squatting until it's too late. As far as carrying small dogs, it's not something I would do all the time, but there are situations in which I do and I WILL NOT feel bad about it. If there is a dog that is being too rough or aggressive I'm going to pick her up period, I would have done the same for my dobies if I were able to. I don't care if she gets a superiority complex or not, i'd rather have a safe dog with a superiority complex than an injured or possibly dead dog any day. Even if the big dog is just playing take a look at candi and you'll see it doesn't take much to snap those tiny legs. and no matter what you all say I think that there are times when you would carry your big dogs if you could.

phoenix
October 15th, 2006, 11:00 AM
I'm pretty strong. I can, but I don't.

kimglenwood
October 15th, 2006, 11:08 AM
Thanks Jackie 467, its nice to have someone on here that understands, I will not feel bad, either, and what am I supposed to do, scope out every area that I go with my small dogs to make sure nobody is coming with a large one, thats nonsense, I would never take them someplace that is knowingly unsafe, but other people will arrive and I can't put a sign up saying don't walk your large dog near my smll dog, I will simply carry them until the threat is over. How many news articles have you guys commented on where a big dog attacked or even killed the small dog and asked why the owner didn't have her in their arms?????? And this is not a contest of big or small dogs, my big dogs were just as wonderful as these little guys for sure, I say again, the point is there are times when carrying is not to accessorize or get attention.

Puppyluv
October 15th, 2006, 11:27 AM
I carried Layla 3 km in the middle of the winter when she got hit by a bike, her paw was nearly chopped off, and no one would give me a ride. Would I do it unless a similar situation arose? Nope. But she's only 35 lbs. What if a 120 lb dog came lumbering along? I'd let them meet and greet. Let them sniff eachother out, let them play, as I have let her do many many times. In fact, I'd be more likely to think "let's get out of here" if I saw one of those screaming terrors that seem to populate my street, than if I saw a big lumbering ball of fur coming our way. I don't get why you consider large dogs a threat to your dog. Your dog may get scared in these situations, but that's likely because you have reinforced this behaviour.

SarahLynn123
October 15th, 2006, 11:59 AM
I have mismatched dogs, a GSD, a Cocker X, and a Pom. The Pom has terrible knees and some days they bother him more then others. I always carry him on walks when he has had enough, its much better for him to be carried when they are getting sore then to keep running. Plus he's still spending time with all of us rather then at home alone.

When I walk the dogs at a regular pace it's walking for the GSD, a trot for the cocker but running for the Pom so he's bound to get sore and tired quicker.


Some people carry small dogs around because they are unable to have children, and end up humanizing their dog. Im sure many people dont even realize they are doing it.

kimglenwood
October 15th, 2006, 03:38 PM
Sorry guys, I think that the generation gap really applies here, I'm not understanding your posts and you are definitely not understanding mine. Sorry, I have given up.

Puppyluv
October 15th, 2006, 03:48 PM
Sorry guys, I think that the generation gap really applies here, I'm not understanding your posts and you are definitely not understanding mine. Sorry, I have given up.
I understand what you're saying. I just don't agree with it. I also don't see how a generation gap can apply when everyone on here is a different age, creating more of a blur of ages, than individual ages.

Prin
October 15th, 2006, 04:04 PM
I don't get that either... What does age have to do with anything?

And I don't get this:
I can't put a sign up saying don't walk your large dog near my smll dog, I will simply carry them until the threat is over.Every large dog is a threat? What happens when two large dogs meet on the street? :eek:

I think what we're trying to say is beware of your dog a) becoming fearful because you lift him/her out of every situation and he/she doesn't learn anything from it, and b) becoming dominant and aggressive because he/she is always higher up than other dogs and face level with you.

TMac
October 15th, 2006, 09:53 PM
or worse, those over-protective dog owners who see you coming with your normal-sized dog, and then in a panic scoop up their little one and hide them in their jacket :eek: i always just smile sweetly and say "hey it's ok, they already had breakfast"... most of the time it makes those scared folks relax and smile :) but sometimes i just get a snarky look :shrug:

if small dogs are never given the chance to interact and socialize with other dogs, humans, etc in a normal way, or walk and exercise near the ground where all those interesting smells and sights are... it's harder for them to grow up to be well-adjusted IMO. you create fearful or shy dogs, or worse, ones with a superiority complex who think it's ok to yap and snarl at everything and everyone "because they can". those owners are NOT doing their dogs a favor. if you want something cute and snuggly to carry around... get a teddy bear! :dog:

Thank you Technodoll!!! This is exactly what I was going to say. It is one of the quickest way to turn your 'little angel' into an aggressive, unsocialized dog. Don't even get me started on my other pet peeve of people thinking that aggressive behaviour in little dogs is oh soooo cute!!!!

:yuck:

TMac
October 15th, 2006, 10:00 PM
..someone may step on her and hurt her or pour something on her and god knows what kinds of edibles are on the city sidewalks,.

Whaaaat??? Where do you live where it would be likely that someone would POUR something on a dog? And why would it be any more likely to have that happen to a small dog versus a big dog???

And the edibles on the sidewalk thing might actually be more of a hazard to bigger dogs (I'm thinking of food crazy labs and hounds with great noses). The other person who posted after you was right - training is the answer to that one.

TMac
October 15th, 2006, 10:12 PM
I don't care if she gets a superiority complex or not, i'd rather have a safe dog with a superiority complex than an injured or possibly dead dog any day.

I'm sorry but I have to say that any dog with a superiority complex is an UNSAFE dog. It shows other dogs inappropriate body language and causes fights and bites. Think about it - if a fight happened, what would stop a big dog from jumping up to the height of your arms?

rainbow
October 15th, 2006, 10:23 PM
That is so true. When I took my Siberian Husky to obedience classes there was a 4 month old jack russell there. It was the smallest of all the 8 dogs in the class and there was two others larger than mine. After class we had a socialization period for all the dogs. The owners of the JRT were forever picking up up their dog when one of the larger ones came around. The trainer kept telling them to stop doing it for the reasons you stated. The JRT owners didn't come to the last two classes and I have often wondered how the dog fared.

rainbow
October 15th, 2006, 10:31 PM
Sorry guys, I think that the generation gap really applies here, I'm not understanding your posts and you are definitely not understanding mine. Sorry, I have given up.


I think I am the oldest one here to respond to this post. There is no generation gap here....just knowledgeable pet owners. From reading your posts on other threads it seems that you are a very caring pet owner. Have you ever owned a large breed dog?

Prin
October 15th, 2006, 10:35 PM
Jackie, maybe Candi is just hard. I can say for SURE that my dad's Jack has been much, much easier to train than Boo. It goes back to what I was saying before, it depends on the dog, not the size. But I will give you the housetraining thing. A few litres is much easier to spot than a couple of drips...

technodoll
October 15th, 2006, 10:39 PM
I'm sorry but I do have to say this. I'v had dobermans all my life and now for the first time have a small dog (had her two years now). And I'm sorry but I never had so much trouble training the dobies like I do with my Candi.

but jackie... you cannot compare training a doberman (ie Working Dog Supreme) with training an Italian Greyhound... sighthounds are notorious "independant thinkers" and were never bred to please man, like dobermans are. it stands to reason that yes, their training when compared to that of a dobie's, would be longer and more difficult. it has nothing to do with size, but everthing to do with breed temperament. :pawprint:

Prin
October 15th, 2006, 10:43 PM
lol very true! Borrow somebody's weimeraner and try training it to do anything.:D
(now there's an independent thinker :D)

kimglenwood
October 16th, 2006, 09:08 AM
I think I am the oldest one here to respond to this post. There is no generation gap here....just knowledgeable pet owners. From reading your posts on other threads it seems that you are a very caring pet owner. Have you ever owned a large breed dog?
Thanks rainbow, I did actually own a shepard and a pitbull, they both passed on this summer one at 7 from cancer and one at 14,(she couldn't seem to live without her buddy) I can understand both sides and have seen many people afraid of their little dogs around my big ones, but they were kind and raised properly and I had my little pom with them for over a year and they were dears to her, but not all owners raise their dogs to be so gentle, and an eight pound dog can be seriously hurt or killed in a quick snap, plus my two new guys will be two and three pounds when they get here and thats a timbit to the wrong dog.

sorry if I offended anyone with my comments, because my dogs are so sickly (I just found out the sister to the male with hydro that are coming here soon, has some problems too)I tend to be a little too touchy and yes, probably a little too overprotective!:sorry:

Jackie467
October 16th, 2006, 02:27 PM
It shows other dogs inappropriate body language and causes fights and bites. Think about it - if a fight happened, what would stop a big dog from jumping up to the height of your arms?

My dog does not do anything like this at all. and If a fight happened I would be what it stopping the dog from jumping up to the height of my arms.
I'm sorry but I have to say that any dog with a superiority complex is an UNSAFE dog
not to it's self and I have stated before that I don't believe dogs get superiority complexes from being held. If they are going to be dominant they are it won't have anything to do with being carried. That is my oppinion and I'm not going to change it.
Jackie, maybe Candi is just hard.
Nope this is with every small dog I have ever encountered. My friends chi, and min pin, my neighbors JRT was the WORST all three of them and I can tell you they poured their hearts into training those dogs. It eventually happened but took forever, even longer than my candi. Maybe your dad just got one that was easier to train.
but jackie... you cannot compare training a doberman (ie Working Dog Supreme) with training an Italian Greyhound... sighthounds are notorious "independant thinkers" and were never bred to please man, like dobermans are. it stands to reason that yes, their training when compared to that of a dobie's, would be longer and more difficult. it has nothing to do with size, but everthing to do with breed temperament.
Ok then what about my moms whippet? He was much easier to train and he is a sight hound as well. And my best friends greyhound? He also was much easier to train. Infact my moms whippet was housetrained in 2 days (brought home at 8 weeks) and he knew stay and leave it in a matter of hours. And I am the one who trained this dog for everything except house training. How do you explain that?

I do believe that small dogs need to be socialized but If i'm not 100% sure my dog is safe than it's not going to happen then and there. She is too important to me. I was the same way with the dobies, they were not to socialize with a dog that had temperment problems. It's simply not safe. I do not carry her if the other dog isn't showing signs of aggression but I'm not going to feel bad when I do carry her because another dog is growling and lunging at her. I refuse to feel bad about protecting my dog from being attacked. I would like to think you all would do the same. The only difference is with the big dog you would have to go out of your way to go around the situation while I just pick my dog up pass the danger and put her back down. I won't apologize for that. My dog is wonderfully behaved and I won't have people bad mouthing me because I carry her rather than put her knowingly in dager.

kimglenwood
October 16th, 2006, 05:11 PM
Thanks Jackie, great post, I totally agree, I apologize if I offended anyone but will never apologize for picking up my dogs to protect them from anything I see as a danger, it can happen too quickly as we have all seen in many news articles here on this site. I am not a Paris Hilton, I adore my dog and have taken the responsibility to protect her by adopting her. With my large dogs, when they were here, I was the same way, but its a different kind of protection when you cannot pick them up, but I have had to holler or shoo a bigger dog away from them and with my little dogs I can pick them up and the danger is over, I am 6 feet tall and a large girl trust me, nobody or nothing is getting my dog out of my arms!!!

technodoll
October 16th, 2006, 05:29 PM
with my little dogs I can pick them up and the danger is over, I am 6 feet tall and a large girl trust me, nobody or nothing is getting my dog out of my arms!!


watch out though... some of them small dawgs can jump up like fleas to snap at whatever they feel like :D maybe you should carry your small dog in a big metal crate on wheels, just to be extra safe? :D (ok kidding... this thread has become quite silly anyways)

kimglenwood
October 16th, 2006, 05:44 PM
Your're so right, I think its gotten a "little" out of hand!!!!

technodoll
October 16th, 2006, 05:47 PM
teehee! good one :highfive:

kimglenwood
October 16th, 2006, 05:56 PM
Good post, so true, bottom line is we all love our dogs. Ands they will definitely be there for us no matter big or small !!!! We love them all! Good quotes!

rainbow
October 16th, 2006, 07:08 PM
I love happy thread endings. :D


:rip:

glasslass
October 16th, 2006, 07:37 PM
Aww, I just got here! Can I just add a little bit more perspective? Not every carried small dog has a superiority complex. My Den-Den was attacked in his own back yard by two large dogs that came through the fence. He was badly hurt and traumatized. Yes, if we're out walking and encounter a large dog he doesn't know, I can tell by his body language that he's fearful and I will pick him up until I feel him relax and he's willing to meet the other dog and feel safe doing it. I don't mean to hurt the other owner's feelings or imply their dog is mean. I'm only trying to help my dog feel safe. No, I'm not going to force him to walk up to the other dog until I know he's feeling confident. My dog's feelings come first. Corky is less than half the size of Den-Den. Yeah they're mismatched too. It worked out that way. We have my mother's dog after she passed away. I used to carry my previous poodle on walks. He was 18 when he died. He still got excited going out and being carried. He wanted the outing same as he did when he was younger and walked. In his old age he had arthritis and he didn't want to walk long distances, but he still loved to be carried. I also carry my dogs when I go to festivals & fairs. They're small and people get crowded. I don't want my dogs stepped on or people tripping over them. Don't judge the motivations of small dog owners. Sometimes we have reasons why we're carrying our small dogs. I don't feel I have to explain Den-Den's history or my reasons. When I go antiqueing, I carry my dogs in my arms in the stores. Dogs are "not allowed" but when I stand in the doorway with my little sweetie in my arms and ask if I can bring him in if I carry him, they never refuse me.

TMac
October 16th, 2006, 07:57 PM
not to it's self and I have stated before that I don't believe dogs get superiority complexes from being held. If they are going to be dominant they are it won't have anything to do with being carried. That is my oppinion and I'm not going to change it.

That's okay. Just because we're on the same board doesn't mean we have to agree on everything. :thumbs up I just think in terms of behaviour issues, little dogs fare better to learn how to socialize while on all four paws. I'll leave it there.

jessi76
October 16th, 2006, 08:16 PM
sometimes, I actually prefer for owners of very small dogs to pick them up when I'm out w/ Tucker. it takes just a second for Tucker to think that small cute dog is a SQUIRREL and then all hell breaks loose. He's got a good leave it, but when he sees a small & furry in reach... it's GAME ON! so, when out walking in public, and small dog comes trotting by, I put myself between small dog and my dog - JUST INCASE.

I don't agree it "helps" the dog in anyway, in fact, I think picking them up can feed their fears, however, I'd rather have a fear fed, than have to pry someone's precious yorkie out from under my dog 'cause Tucker mistakenly thought it was a giant chipmunk.

I don't really care one way or the other, if you're out having quality time with your dog - walk, carry, push along in a cart, whatever makes you & your pooch happy is what matters.