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He Just Wants to Say Hi! (Dog Behaviour)

dogmelissa
August 31st, 2006, 03:19 PM
(Mod's please move if this would be better in another topic)

I found this article awhile ago... not sure what lead me to it.
I've seen so many people in situations where they let their dogs get away with being rude and think it's the other dog being bad when it barks or snaps or growls at theirs. I've been in situations where people allowed their dogs to chase mine, though mine is obviously scared, and they think it's funny. I never stood up for myself, and told them to control their dogs. I never tried to educate them on what the dogs were telling each other.

Even in my agility class--where a shortened version of this article was handed out--one dog who is afraid of others will show his teeth when the others approach. And the guardians of the afraid dog (who actually were absent when the article was handed out) grab the dog's head and turn it away from the dog approaching, but the other people who got the article ignore their dog's behaviour or give dirty looks to the scared dog's people.

It makes me sad, and it's very difficult knowing that because my dog is scared, there are few places I can take him, because there are so many rude dogs out there.
I will do my best to educate people or at least tell them their dog is being rude and hope that makes them leave me & mine alone, and I hope that some of those rude dog people read this article, identify themselves in it and try to make changes.

Here is the article: http://www.flyingdogpress.com/sayhi.html

Comments?
Melissa

dakar
August 31st, 2006, 04:07 PM
Excellent article. We have constant interactoin with two very rude dogs - they live on our street and we can't physically go for a walk without passing their house. Now I have a much better concept of what's going on and how to handle it. Thanks!

les
August 31st, 2006, 05:25 PM
That's a great article ... I wish ALL people would read it!

Reminds me of TONS of dogs I've met. A friend of mine has 1 very rude lab and 1 medium rude lab. We used to go to the dog park together in one car (4 dogs!!) Her dogs somehow don't seem to understand proper canine behaviour. My male likes his space (my female can crowd him and he can crowds her but strange dogs - - NO WAY! he doesn't like it) So we're in the car one day, I'm driving, 4 dogs in the back - in an element so they have a lot of room. I hear my male growl so I look back and her dog is all but on top of him! Her dog just doesn't get it :eek: I had to pull over and tie my guy near the back and her's up front. And she says to me right after "You know ... aggressive behaviour like that is frowned upon" :rolleyes:

Another lady I see (again with labs, now I have labs too) has one dog that always humps. As soon as it sees my dogs it humps one of them. She does nothing (well, now she does but she didn't used to) so I'd reach down and pull her dog off by the collar (sometimes not so gently) Again, my male won't tolerate that (unless it's my female doing it ;) ) So one day her dog gets on mine and mine spazzed. Didn't hurt her dog but he freaked out growling and nipping. She yelled at mine! LOL So I yelled back at her ... geez lady I told you like a million times that my male won't put up with that! But, all it took was once .. and now her's won't even think about trying to mount my male.

I could go on and on ... I run into tons of rude dogs .. lol I wish they could both read that article ... maybe I should print it ;)

dogmelissa
August 31st, 2006, 06:01 PM
Les, you absolutely *should* print it. I've considered printing it and taking copies to the dog park with me and handing them out. I watched a man with a puppy and a couple with an older (but similar sized dog) last time I was there. The puppy and the dog were playing with the dog's ball. They'd been playing probably 2 full minutes, and I guess the puppy got rough or overstepped his bounds, and the dog barked really sharply at him. The puppy-man rushed over, grabbed his pup by the collar and dragged him away saying "that dog doesn't like you, you leave him alone." Like the adult did something wrong! I was *so* tempted to tell him that the other dog was just teaching the pup what not to do, but since neither of the dogs involved were mine, I just ignored it. But I was *less* than impressed with the lady who let her rotti pup chase my dog about 15' down a pathway (and there was no way I could get to Cube to help him!), when he ran away from me, toward the lady, with his tail between his legs. She *laughed* when he tried to hide behind her but did NOTHING about her dog chasing him. I was so mad I wanted to hit her!!!

Sometimes I'm sure that a dog'd behaviour is an obvious picture of what the people who take care of them are like... rude dogs have rude people and shy dogs have shy people?
Anyways, ya, print it. In fact, I think I will print it, too!
Melissa

Prin
August 31st, 2006, 06:17 PM
Just now when I went out for a walk, a little chi-like dog ran up to my dogs all dominant and leashless and the owner (aka the twit) actually told ME that I'd better hold my dogs tightly. :eek: :yell: :yell:

It's a pretty long article just to say "saying hi" and frantically approaching another dog and getting in their faces is not acceptable, but a dog reacting aggressively in response is normal. Right?

dogmelissa
September 1st, 2006, 12:32 PM
It's a pretty long article just to say "saying hi" and frantically approaching another dog and getting in their faces is not acceptable, but a dog reacting aggressively in response is normal. Right?

Poor Prin... I cannot understand why people think that when *THEIR* dog is off leash, that the ones who are leashed are the ones who need to be controlled. Some people are just so stupid.

I have a shorter version of that article, but not in the computer. It's only 2 pages. I'll look into getting it scanned and then maybe that would be a better thing to print for stupid-people. Then again, do we really think some of them can read?

You've basically summarized the article, but there's more to it than that... anyways, I'll see if I can scan the shorter one in, or if not I'll try to find time to type it (or copy & paste from the original article).

Good luck on the weekend everyone!! I'm outta town, where I have to deal with the most amazingly stupid people: those who let their dogs run around loose in bear country!
Melissa

OntarioGreys
September 2nd, 2006, 09:57 AM
but a dog reacting aggressively in response is normal. Right?



Yes, but I am not talking about ripping another dog apart, We are talking about a split second correction be it a nip, growl or bark, or bowl them over and pin them, dogs will rarely use more force than they deem necessary to make their point, much the same as a mother dog will do to her pups when they are older, to teach them proper dog etiquette or respect
much like this incident So one day her dog gets on mine and mine spazzed. Didn't hurt her dog but he freaked out growling and nipping . She yelled at mine! LOL So I yelled back at her ... geez lady I told you like a million times that my male won't put up with that! But, all it took was once .. and now her's won't even think about trying to mount my male.
this is how dogs learn what is acceptable or not and how they learn to communicate with one another and also an example of the problems caused when we take pups away from the mom and litter too soon, they enter a human family and have not learned how to communicate with other dogs and then find themselves in trouble. In the mounting situation the dog that was mounting as a display of dominance, thinking the other dog was submitting, as long as humans were intervening and stopping, it was not until the dog told it off, did it accept the the other dog was more dominant and needed to be respected as such, sometimes allowing a dog to correct is the best way for them to get along, when we try to intervene sometimes all we really do is prolong the problems and cause increasing problems between the dogs