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What dog breed(s) would be good for this situation?

LM1313
August 24th, 2006, 09:50 AM
What breeds would be happy with an hour walk in the morning, an hour walk in the evening, and playtime in a fenced yard for probably an hour or two every day?

It would be actual walking for the morning and evening walk, BTW, because I don't have the endurance for jogging or running. ;)

I'd also prefer a breed that doesn't require a lot of grooming . . . maybe a brushing once or twice a week. Shedding is fine, I don't mind fur, LOL!

LibbyP
August 24th, 2006, 09:59 AM
Are you looking for really big? I highly recommend my big girl Libby to anyone at the dog park that asks and knows what breed of dog she is (E.Mastiff), she is very laid back in the house, actually a big sofa potato, she enjoys her walks and play time but other than that she's a really good girl, quiet, you do however have to get used to drool and slingers everywhere:yuck: she doesn't bother with the cats/kids, she does shed but not going to the groomer shed, just a quick brush down but that's my (HO)

Golden Girls
August 24th, 2006, 10:41 AM
I think any breed would be perfectly happy with this deal :cloud9:

Prin
August 24th, 2006, 11:50 AM
I agree. That's a pretty sweet deal.

we3beagles
August 24th, 2006, 12:07 PM
Beagle, beagle beagle. A 3 year old beagle would be perfect for you. My * year old has never had a bath in his whole life and his coat is perfection. He doesn't smell bad (of course I love doggy smell) and you just need to clean his ears twice a week and clip his nails and brush his teeth. They are perfectly content to sit with you and watch TV or walk if you desire.

rainbow
August 24th, 2006, 12:09 PM
I agree also...what dog wouldn't love a deal like that? :D

Do you have a preference as to size or anything? What pets do you have now?

dogcatharmony
August 24th, 2006, 02:18 PM
i agree with any breed would love that life..............not that is has to be a pure bred.........i think all the dogs at a local shelter would jump at the chance for that kind of home.

LM1313
August 24th, 2006, 02:56 PM
Right now I have two lovely indoor kitties. :)

I love large and medium dogs. Small isn't my favorite dog size, although I've always liked papillions. But I feel large dogs are the most huggable. :)

I won't be able to get a dog for a while because right now I'm in an apartment . . . Saving up for a house, though! So I'm just planning and dreaming, LOL!

Some other traits I'd look for in a dog would be . . .

- friendly towards people and animals (I don't need a watchdog, I'm fine with a "lead strangers to the silverware" dog)
- receptive to training (not too stubborn or dense)
- doesn't see small animals as prey (due to the cats)

I know it depends a lot on the individual dog, of course. ;)

Do you think that would be enough exercise for a dalmation? I've always admired them, but I've heard they have a ton of energy. Not that that's my ONLY choice, it's just a breed I was thinking about. :)

I also have to decide between a puppy versus an adult . . . I love puppies (doesn't everyone, LOL!), but maybe it would be easier to get an older, calmer dog used to the cats.

(Or I could get one of each.)

MyBirdIsEvil
August 24th, 2006, 05:58 PM
I would recommend a collie.

I love large and medium dogs. Check. They get around 60 lbs.

friendly towards people and animals Check. They will bark if they think there's danger normally, but they rarely bite, and a well socialized collie would be extremely hard to make violent. My collie loves kids and tries to be friends with the cats, though they don't like him, lol

doesn't see small animals as prey Most collies won't attack a cat, but ALL dogs regardless of breed need to be trained to leave cats alone. Collies usually aren't very interested in cats though (other than to play).

Do you think that would be enough exercise for a dalmation? I don't know much about dalmations, but from dogbreedinfo.com:

They get along well with other pets, but some may be aggressive with strange dogs; males often dislike other males. Somewhat high-strung, and can be timid without enough socialization.

About collies from dogbreedinfo.com:

They are good-natured, friendly, dogs. They are energetic outdoors. They can be wary of strangers, stubborn and indolent. It has a fairly good sense of protectiveness for its master, especially for children. They are not aggressive, but they do tend to be suspicious of people they do not like.

They're usually fairly calm indoors. You can't do repetative training with them, but if you make training sessions fun and non-redundant they're fun and easy to train with.

A lot of individual dogs from any breed are great dogs, but if you're wanting to narrow it down to certain breeds I would definately recommend a collie. Plus it's the only dog I can recommend that I've actually owned, lol.

I LOVE rottweilers, but I used to have a female rottweiler and they can be extremely highstrung. She was probably the friendliest dog I've ever seen and loved children, but she was very hyper. I think the males are supposed to be calmer but I'm not sure.

I have 2 puppies and I would definately recommend you get an older dog. If you get a purebred, there are many older dogs that you can adopt which have been housetrained, socialized, etc. Also, these older dogs, though housebroken and stuff, are less likely to get adopted. Everyone goes and looks at the puppies and goes "OMG! HOW CUTE!" and ignores the older dogs, so I would consider it.
You also know what personality an adult dog will have. If you get a purebred puppy it's personality may not turn out anything like breed standard, but you won't know 'til it's older.

dogmelissa
August 24th, 2006, 06:18 PM
I would also recommend that you go to your local shelter... maybe even *now* and talk to them about what kind of dogs they get most often, and what kind they'd recommend for you (though I also agree that it sounds very much like just about any breed would be *very* happy with that situation, though I suspect that 4 hours of activity would be too much for a small non-working dog breed, like my Maltese). You can also have a quick look around the net to see if there are any specific breed rescue places near your town; there might be one that has a breed (dalmation for example) that you already know you might like. Or see if there is an all-breed rescue.

Don't rule out breeders even if you decide you don't want a pup (though with the cats, it might be safer to get a pup so that you can be sure they didn't learn earlier in their life to chase cats), as some breeders will have adult dogs that they either couldn't find homes for when they were pups or who were returned due to changes in their families situation. Or perhaps the breeder kept them to show and it turns out they're not a good show dog. A good breeder will always have a clause in their contract to take back a dog that an family cannot keep (for whatever reason). Some places (shelters even!) will let you have a dog on a trial basis to see if it fits into your life and home, as many dogs act differently when they're in a new home than they do in a kennel or at a breeder's house, and they don't want you to get a dog home (permanently) and then realize that it has the world's highest prey drive or eats leather furniture (when that's all you have!) and then you have to give it back.

And thank you in advance for considering what kind of dog you want much much in advance of getting one. The spur-of-the-moment decisions are always bad. I'm also glad that you have looked at your life and know that you can commit so much time to a dog; I'm sure whatever dog you get will be grateful for all your advanced planning and the time commitment you put into not only choosing the right dog, but into their needs.
I'm sure whatever dog you choose up with, whether it's big, small, purebred or pure mutt, will be exactly what you wanted and be an awesome dog.

Good luck in your home search and dog search. Don't forget to give your kitties enough time to settle into their new home before you get a dog (from experience, at least a couple months).

Melissa

Prin
August 24th, 2006, 06:23 PM
You describe a lab or lab mutt perfectly and there are gazillions of them- you can pick your shape, size, color, personality.:)

rainbow
August 24th, 2006, 06:52 PM
I think when the time comes andyou're ready for a dog you should go to a shelter or rescue and see what's available. Tell them the qualities you're looking for and they'll be able to tell you which dogs of the ones they have are a match for you. :dog:

Prin
August 24th, 2006, 07:52 PM
I think when the time comes andyou're ready for a dog you should go to a shelter or rescue and see what's available. And who you fall in love with, too.;) :cloud9:

dogmelissa
August 24th, 2006, 11:15 PM
And who you fall in love with, too.;) :cloud9:

Pffff, we all know it's not you who picks the dog, it's the dog that picks you!! :evil: :dog:

rainbow
August 25th, 2006, 12:01 AM
That's what I mean...you just know when it happens. :love:

Golden Girls
August 25th, 2006, 06:32 AM
Another thought :)

When the time is right maybe you can consider fostering from your local SPCA http://search.petfinder.com/shelterSearch/shelterSearch.cgi?animal=dog&breed=&age=&size=&specialNeeds=&declawedPets=&children=&status=&id=&internal=&contact=&name=&shelterid=WA26&sort=pet.Identifier&preview=1. It could be a great trial and help you chose the perfect dog for you and your 2 lovely kitties :cat: before actually committing.

Adopting an older dog (even a young dog) has many benefits ... usually their already trained but more importantly you've possibly saved him/her as well as creating a free space for the next homeless animal.

I do think however going this route ... the hardest part will be not falling in :love: with all of them :cloud9:

Puppyluv
August 25th, 2006, 08:55 AM
Do you think that would be enough exercise for a dalmation? I've always admired them, but I've heard they have a ton of energy. Not that that's my ONLY choice, it's just a breed I was thinking about. :)



I grew up with a dal, and my best friend's family had a dal, both from great breeders (so not a temperement flaw) but I would say, deffinately not. They need to run, and they need exercise more often. Your proposed schedule would work for almost any breed of dog, but dals are one of the few that it wouldn't work for. (also, if you think your dog sheds a lot, you have never met a dal, I sitll have fur on my stuff from our dal who passed away 8 years ago)

LM1313
August 25th, 2006, 10:08 AM
Ahhh, I'd better cross dalmations off my list then. Thanks for letting me know . . . Better to know now than after I've got one! What about border collies? Do you think it would be enough exercise for one of them?
Edit: I've been researching and there is NO WAY I could provide enough exercise for a border collie. Ebony was part border collie (she would do "the stare" when playing), but her lab side must have mellowed her a lot.

I like collies, but the rough collies take a lot of grooming, don't they? How common/rare are smooth-coated collies?

Prin, I am a huge fan of lab-mixes! :D And of course there are always tons at the local animal shelters. (I've already started checking Petfinder, LOL!) I love black dogs, I have NEVER understood why they're passed over so much at shelters.

But I am hesitant to get a dog that looks too much like Ebony did (she was a lab mix) because I don't want to feel like I'm just "replacing" her and also I'm worried that I would compare the new dog with her too much. She was an incredibly sweet, easy to train, obedient dog; she never had an accident after four months old, she loved all people and animals (well, except squirrels :D), and you could leave food on the coffee table or end table and she wouldn't touch it, even though it was at head-level of her. I don't want to get a similar looking dog and always be haranguing, "Why aren't you housetrained as fast as Ebony was? Why don't you learn to sit as quickly as Ebony did? Argh, you chewed up the couch, Ebony never did that!" That just wouldn't be fair to the new dog. So I only want a lab mix that isn't pure black like Ebo was (like, one that has shepherd markings or a white foot or something) or that's significantly different in size and build.

I just thought of another factor . . . I'd love to be able to do agility with my dog! I actually wanted to do it with Ebony, even started training her, but somehow I got the impression only purebreds were allowed to compete and I gave it up. But I was browsing around an Agility Dog page just now and it seems that it's just at AKC events that only purebred dogs are allowed, while other events allowed mixed breeds.

I know exactly what you mean about the animal choosing you . . . When I was at the shelter choosing kitties, my little tabby Remy walked right over to the bars of the cage and waved his paw through them to get my attention. And he's usually such a shy little fellow! :)

Angies Man
August 25th, 2006, 12:25 PM
I'm a std poodle person, great for apartment living ( had one in an apt.) They generally get along with everyone, even kitties, but bond strongly to THEIR person. Can go all day without a potty call. Smart, clean, pleasing, and easy to train. Incredibly affectionate. Need to be taken in for grooming every 6 wks, tho.

I had a Great Dane (probably mixed with some lab) Brindle from the Spokane pound (probably now called Animal Shelter.) My Dane was the lifetime dog to which I'll always compare other dogs. Kept me alive when I was down, a source of daily joy and wonder. I was in grad school in WSU, he could go 10 hrs without an out. In summer, I found a place where I could park my pickup under a big tree and leave him for a couple of hours while I went to class or work--a bit of rug in the back of the truck, some water and food, and he was happy--I used to watch him wagging his tail and greeting folks as they walked by (it was the 70's, a totally different time for dogs.) Loved to go out and about and feel the awe of mere mortals and the love of little kids. There's a rather large Dane rescue in Riverside CA run by Burt Ward (Robin from the 60's TV version of Batman.) Other than eating Great Dane sized meals & making Great Dane sized poops, they are a rather small impact dog (surprisingly easy to live with, like to ride in the car, sleep next to the bed all curled up on a blanket.)

I know there are good Dalmations out there, but the periodic Disney movies haven't helped the breed. There's a lot of inbreeding in the Dalmation world, aggressive behavior, blindness, and deafness have been the result.

I've met some awfully nice Greyhounds over the years, tho. And they are pretty clean, manageable dogs. Race dogs need socializing, and generally are fostered before they're ready for adoption. And there seems to be an unlimited number of potential adoptees to choose from.

In smaller dogs (mediums) I've never met a Welch Corgi I didn't like--another breed that hasn't been popular enough to have the breed messed up. Miniature Poodles (breed standard is less than 15 pounds) have all of the wonderful qualities of the Standards but in a smaller package. Both breeds don't ACT like smallish dogs. They aren't nervous or timid.

I agree with the general underlying principal that it's best to look for rescue/shelter dogs first. Between Spokane and Couer D. there's probably a perfect dog for you just waiting for you to come and get him.

If you want to check Petfinder and look at the Reno area SPCA, Humane Society(they have a Great Dane!), Sugarland Ranch (Mastif Rescue--I love Mastiffs!), Saints of the West, or Wylie (my favorite rescue shelter,) and see something that interests you, LMK and I'll go have a look. Seattle and Tacoma have excellent shelters and rescues, too.:dog:

Puppyluv
August 25th, 2006, 12:46 PM
What about a beautiful Irish Setter? Or a little less energetic, a Gordon Setter?

MyBirdIsEvil
August 25th, 2006, 01:36 PM
I like collies, but the rough collies take a lot of grooming, don't they? How common/rare are smooth-coated collies?

Rough collies actually don't take much brushing compared to most longhaired dogs. They have a coat made to not hold in mud and stuff, so if you brush them for a few minutes every day that's sufficient. If you don't wanna brush them every day, a heavy brushing about once a week is ok. They don't shed too much either on good food if you keep them brushed, except when they're blowing their coat. They're also not prone to knots.
I dunno how common smooth coated collies are, I've never seen one in person, and couldn't really find any rescues or reputable breeders, but where I live collies aren't real common overall, so I don't know.

Btw, border collies are really high energy and stubborn, so I dunno how good of a choice that is. Their grooming is also a little more high maintenence than rough collies because it knots a bit easier.

dogmelissa
August 25th, 2006, 03:45 PM
I just thought of another factor . . . I'd love to be able to do agility with my dog! I actually wanted to do it with Ebony, even started training her, but somehow I got the impression only purebreds were allowed to compete and I gave it up. But I was browsing around an Agility Dog page just now and it seems that it's just at AKC events that only purebred dogs are allowed, while other events allowed mixed breeds.


You can do agility with any dog breed, given that the dog has the right temperament for it. Generally a dog who is very afraid or very high-strung (ie easily strartled or aggravated), and some dogs who have like the world's biggest personal space or are dog-aggressive, won't be suited to agility. But I don't think you're going to get one of these kind of dogs (none of these traits are breed-specific, btw). I just started agility with my dog (Maltese X) and in my class there's a Wheaton Terror, I mean terrier, a Weimeraner, a Border Collie, and Cube the Maltese Mutt.

Most agility events aren't AKC or CKC sponsored. There are some, but most are open to all breeds, mixes and sizes, given that they are properly vaccinated, etc etc etc. Where do you live?--I'll have a look and see if there is a local agility club you can talk to, or ask my trainer, she has been everywhere judging agility. And just FYI, the Superdogs (I'm sure you've heard of them?)--over 40% of their participants (dogs) are rescues, ie they may be an identifiable breed, but don't have registration or "papers".

Melissa

Edited to add the following:
"The public may visit dog agility trials from about 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 26-27 at University Elementary School in Spokane Valley, 1613 S. University Road, on the south side of the school. The Spokane Dog Training Club is holding the free event."
Spokane Dog Training Club: http://www.spokanedtc.org/newagility.htm

However.... many "general" training places also offer agility classes. You may want to visit a few (call first!) to find a trainer you like, a facility you like, and a schedule that would suit you. Please remember that if you get a puppy, agility training is often done a little differently because it's bad for puppies to jump higher than their own shoulders until 1.5 yrs of age (hard on their bones & joints), and I don't believe that any organization allows competitions with dogs less than this age (at least not with the "general") group.
(If you want to see if there are others, I did a search on "dog agility spokane", but you could also check in the phone book for dog training facilities or even ask the shelter, a good quality pet store (Walmart won't know!), or your veterinarian to make a recommendation on a facility or a specific trainer. If your first dog decides he or she doesn't want to have anything to do with agility, you might have to get a second or third or fourth dog. :P :crazy: There is also flyball and lots of other activities to try with a dog, but agility is, IMO, the funnest!

phoenix
August 25th, 2006, 04:33 PM
I'll put in a good word for my fav, the boxer. The only thing going against them is their energy level as puppies (up to age 2 or 3). That said, my puppy is one of the calmest pups i've seen, so it depends. As older dogs, they slow down considerably and they are SOO loving and friendly. Tons of kisses. Good sleepers, preferably using you as a pillow. They have 'wiggle bums' and are very joyful dogs. They shed but not tumbleweeds. Excellent agility ability when fit. Just watch for genetic diseases with purebreds, they are prone to cancer and other bad things. They are medium sized (boys are larger, about 70 to 80 lbs, girls about 60 lbs or so, with lots of variation. They can have a prey drive (ie. kitties) so would need training, socialization around cats. Rumored to be very good with children.

If you're looking to rescue, lots of white boxers need homes because they aren't supposed to be show/breeding material. They are neat looking. Check out boxer rescue Ontario or Quebec.

Angies Man
August 25th, 2006, 04:42 PM
When I was growing up, we had a scottish collie, looked more like Lassie and was regular collie size, but didn't have as long a nose. I guess these are considered smooth collies. She looked like a sheltie, but was at least half again larger than the shelties I've seen. I think we got her around 1955, or so, Lady was my brother's birthday present (tho she looked to my mom as the pack leader.) She was a really sweet dog, infinitely patient with three little children--but absolutely hated my dad. So I guess she was pretty intelligent, too. :evil: ;) She looked a bit like this dog:

http://myfiero.com/uploads/3538_.jpg


A trully hairy beast, who managed to brush up against my dad's suit pants just as he was leaving for work. :thumbs up

If you google collies, there are breeder's websites that come up. Some beautiful dogs, too. And another wonderful breed that hasn't been popular enough in this country (or on this continent?) to get terribly inbred.

MyBirdIsEvil
August 25th, 2006, 05:38 PM
When I was growing up, we had a scottish collie, looked more like Lassie and was regular collie size, but didn't have as long a nose. I guess these are considered smooth collies.

A scottish collie is just the name for both the rough and smooth coat collies.

The ones with the long fur are rough collies, I have one, I would know :D .

The smooth coated collies have short fur.

If you google collies, there are breeder's websites that come up. Some beautiful dogs, too. And another wonderful breed that hasn't been popular enough in this country (or on this continent?) to get terribly inbred.

I see you live in the U.S and that is absolutely NOT true. Collies are prone to genetic eye diseases, hip dysplasia, elbow problems, and several other things. I don't know of ANY purebred that isn't prone to some kind of genetic disease. You have it backwards though, the less dogs the more common diseases and inbreeding are because the genetic pool is smaller. Yes it means there may be less backyard breeders, but otherwise has nothing to do with genetic diseases.
It's EXTREMELY easy to get a poorly bred collie, I didn't find this out until after we got one. Collies are one of the breeds that are VERY likely to be poorly bred and have problems if you don't get them from a reputable breeder.

Scroll down the page and there's a picture of a smooth collie. (http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/collie.htm)

LL1
August 25th, 2006, 05:45 PM
Good place to look at regarding various breeds,I suggest clicking the review-What's good about 'em...what's bad about 'em section

http://yourpurebredpuppy.com/dogbreeds/index.html

LM1313
August 25th, 2006, 05:55 PM
I'm getting some great advice, thanks guys. :grouphug:

Angie's Man, this is what a smooth collie looks like:

http://www.pets.ca/breedprofiles/a/collie-smooth/c15.jpg

There's a smooth collie that I see every day walking home from the bus stop . . . very pretty dog! The only difference between a rough collie and a smooth collie is the length of their coat. :)

MyBirdIsEvil
August 25th, 2006, 06:03 PM
Here's a pic of Royce at 4 months and now at 8 months. Rough coat sable & white.
He's not in full coat and probably won't completely get his until he's about 3. He wouldn't have that huge fluffy coat in the summer anyway.

Angies Man
August 25th, 2006, 07:59 PM
Guess I had it bass axwards, it's only been about 40 years since I've even thought about Lady in any way more than a kid's memory.

Anyhow, Lady was a full sized long haired, short nosed collie. Looked alot like like the dogs used for the Lassie series.

As you say, all breeds (and non-breeds, too) have health problems. When I say that the breed hasn't been messed up, I guess I mean that it hasn't been hugely OVER bred by profit driven irresponsible breeders, the way (in my limited experience) dalmations, some GSDs, pitty's, others have. I'm sorry you got a dog with health problems (I've had that happen myself.) You can be the most responsible adopter and the breeder can be the most up & up breeder and getting a puppy is still always a gamble.

Angies Man
August 25th, 2006, 08:00 PM
Here's a pic of Royce at 4 months and now at 8 months. Rough coat sable & white.
He's not in full coat and probably won't completely get his until he's about 3. He wouldn't have that huge fluffy coat in the summer anyway.

Sure is handsome.:thumbs up

MyBirdIsEvil
August 26th, 2006, 12:57 AM
Sure is handsome.

Thanks! :)

I guess I mean that it hasn't been hugely OVER bred by profit driven irresponsible breeders

I get what you mean, I just didn't want anyone thinking it's not possible to get a byb collie or a poorly bred one. There's people out there breeding them just for looks (they just want a lassie-dog), with no account of temperment, or anything else. This is more prevalent in a lot of breeds, but it still happens in collies.
That's what happened with our collie, he has the classic temperment and look, but he also has hip dysplasia, which is probably why the guy took him and a couple of his littermates to the pet store. They were already fully socialized and partially housebroken, but they were useless for breeding or show. We've yet to run into more than a couple people around here that have even seen a collie in person, and from what I've found out there's only 1or 2 people that breed them around here, so apparently someone discretely took them to the petstore before anyone found out they had genetic problems.

LM1313
August 29th, 2006, 05:36 PM
Houses cost so MUCH!! :yuck: They recommend that you save up 20% of the price of the house . . . I'm going to be saving forever. :(

Anyway, back on the dog issue, right now these are my top choices.

Beagle - I've always liked them. They're small, but sturdy. They're friendly and usually good with other pets. They have an easy to care for coat. They're cute! Also, my mom had them before I was born, so she may be able to provide firsthand training insights. However, I've heard that once off-leash they'll zone out and follow their nose. I'm wondering what that would mean for agility training.

Brittany Spaniel - I think this might be "the breed". :) They're active, but not insanely so. They're good with people and animals. They're easy to train. Their coat only needs brushing a few times a week. They have more dual champions (field and show) than all the other sporting breeds combined. Even though I don't hunt, that pleases me because I feel a breed should always be able to fulfill its original purpose well. :) And their rescue organization is VERY well organized and has people in every state, including Washington! :thumbs up Scroll down to TJ, he is even in the same city as I am! Ah, if only my current apartment allowed me to adopt more pets . . . http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org/index.php?module=abrTracker&func=view&sid=1#WA

Labrador or Golden Retriever - Both breeds that I love. :) Finding either through a rescue or a mix through the animal shelter would be easy, too.

Collie (smooth) - I've always liked them . . . Big, beautiful dogs who a lot of people don't even recognize as being the same breed as Lassie. :) I'm not sure how common they are compared to rough collies, though.

Prin
August 29th, 2006, 06:03 PM
Brittany Spaniel - I think this might be "the breed". :) They're active, but not insanely so. They're good with people and animals. They're easy to train. Their coat only needs brushing a few times a week. They have more dual champions (field and show) than all the other sporting breeds combined. Even though I don't hunt, that pleases me because I feel a breed should always be able to fulfill its original purpose well. :) Honestly, I've met a few brittanies and they were sooo riled up. Not sure these are good for an apartment. :o The ones I know were in the city, exercised fairly adequately and still managed to eat themselves. :( IMO, it's a pretty hardcore hunting breed.:shrug:

My friend's mom got a smooth collie as a rescue. It can happen (once in a while). He's so smart and gentle. :thumbs up

canning4aliving
August 29th, 2006, 07:48 PM
Great danes are known as the "gentle giant". Very much laid back and not really into rough-housing but they do enjoy your company very much. Not much grooming needed except basics/Teeth, and hair once in a while...They sound ferocious when they bark and PPL just assume they are vicious because of their size (actually VERY untrue)! ( breeder for 14 yrs) Our beloved JUDGE went with us everywhere and the kids won trophies in 4-H with them..They really want to please and be your 125lb lap dog! He passed away years ago and we miss him like it was yesterday!
Great Dane rescue is on the net...they could help you I am sure....

jessi76
August 29th, 2006, 08:42 PM
Honestly, I've met a few brittanies and they were sooo riled up. Not sure these are good for an apartment. :o The ones I know were in the city, exercised fairly adequately and still managed to eat themselves. :( IMO, it's a pretty hardcore hunting breed.:shrug:

I agree. my mom has one.... and oh dear god, someone please get that dog a vallum or 5. (and she's seven yrs old! acts like she's seven MONTHS old) she's a spaz. a total spaz. a brilliant dog, a brilliant hunter, but can be very demanding. (of course my mom's dog is spoiled rotten, so I'm sure that's most of her problem)

LM1313
August 29th, 2006, 11:09 PM
Yikes, I didn't know they were so, er . . . spaztastic? :o

I like Great Danes, but isn't their average lifespan eight to ten years? :(

Prin
August 29th, 2006, 11:12 PM
Yeah, it's pretty short, but FULL of love. :o I don't know, to me life-span is the last criteria because none of them stay long enough.:(

Shelties3
August 29th, 2006, 11:27 PM
You want to give a dog lots of exercise, and you want one that is "huggable". The idea of a collie is a good one, but why don't you consider a sheltie? They are a smaller collie, but if you get one that is toward the larger size of the spectrum (sheltie standard is 13" to 16" at the shoulder) they weigh around 25-30lb (although very easily overweight). They are very huggable, loveable, SUPER easy to train.

They do well with small space, so even your apartment is ok. They like to play, fetch and work. They require little food, if they don't have a full length coat (to the floor) like mine do, they require little grooming, but do shed a bit. They like to cuddle, they like loves, and my oldest (3 yaer old male) plays with the cat next door. We just told him it was a puppy, and never said the "kitty" word, and they play and wrestle and chase. They LOVE kids, make wonderful watchdogs, but would like them to death, if they didn't make the intruder fall over from watching them spin in their excitedness to see someone that may give them attention!

They have wonderful temperments and great personalities, plus, they look like a hoity toity breed, that doesn't need as much time and effort as a fru-fru breed! No hair clipping (except toes), almost no ear problems, just some brushing, and teeth brushing!

OntarioGreys
August 30th, 2006, 07:38 PM
The average life span on a great dane is more like 6 to 8 years old.

Many labs can be very hyper especially young adults, my former lab needed 6 hours of hard exercise a day, and there have been several posts that have come up here with others that seen the hyperness as well, they are bred to work all day out hunting

If you look at most large breeds they are working breeds that require stamina/endurance to do their job, so they have higher energy needs and many need something to do to keep them from going stir crazy.


Greyhounds are a bit different, they are sprinters much like a cheetah they must conserve energy to make one all out run at high speed to capture game. Greyhound on the track are raced only every 3rd day much like they would if still a wild breed hunting their own game, for example a large hare can provide them with sufficent food for 3 days before they need to hunt again. Inbetween hunts/races they mostly sleep to recover energy to make another high speed hunt. For this reason they make ideal apartment dogs with walking recommedations being 2 15 minute walks and one half hour walk to keep them sufficiently exercised, and if you can find a fenced in place to let them have a brief run once a week then all the better, this also results in lower feeding costs I have a young more active 65 lb girl and an 82 pound couch potato, both get a total of 1 1/2 cups of EVO a day, if you were feeding a food like Canidae you may need 3 cups for a larger male. If they are feeling particularly playful indoosr they may grab a stuffed sqeaky toy tossing and pouncing around with it for a 5 or 10 minutes. And the majority will rarely bark, As for size range tiny female 45lb to a large male just over 100lbs, even at 2 years old most retired track greys are pretty much settled down.

rainbow
August 30th, 2006, 09:30 PM
But I am hesitant to get a dog that looks too much like Ebony did (she was a lab mix) because I don't want to feel like I'm just "replacing" her and also I'm worried that I would compare the new dog with her too much.

I thought the same thing. I had two huskies :rip: that I loved dearly and didn't want another purebred husky especially because some of them they look so much alike.

However, I did end up getting another husky (story too long to go into unnecessary details) and I couldn't be happier. The one I have now has slightly different markings than my last black/white but is completely different personality wise than my two previous ones. Just something for you to think about especially if you don't mind what the lab is mixed with. ;)

LM1313
September 30th, 2006, 01:20 PM
Just a quick update . . . I am definitely going to have to get a purebred if I want to do agility, because the ONLY agility competitions in town are the AKC ones. The closest USDAA competition is on the other side of the state! How annoying! :evil: So I'm definitely going to get a purebred UNLESS the AKC decides to open agility competition to spayed/neutered mutts, which I hope and pray they will!

Question: Let's say you get a purebred from a rescue, but without "papers". Can it compete in AKC events?

Prin
September 30th, 2006, 01:27 PM
I thought the AKC allowed mutts in agility now...:confused: :shrug:

ILoveMutts!
September 30th, 2006, 01:44 PM
http://www.toller.ca/

mafiaprincess
September 30th, 2006, 03:40 PM
No Prin.. You can get an event number for an AKC recognized breed, that has no paperwork.. (ie Cider from a petstore.. has to look like the breed to get the number on top of following other things like needing to chip your pet)
But, they only talked about mutts in sports.. it hasn't happened yet.

Yes LM. Cider could do AKC or CKC agility if we got her chipped with the brand they want, showed spay proof sent 2 photos and paid them our money.