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Breed ideas for second dog

PetFriendly
August 12th, 2006, 09:57 AM
I need your input on which types of breeds to research as a second dog for my household. Right now, I'm open to mixes from various rescues or Humane Societies and am open age wise, but would prefer something a little younger so as to be more compatible with my dog of 1 1/2 years.

The breed or breed mix must be compatible with the following:
I have a small dog who can really only take a 45 minute walk per day, and play in the yard for another hour or so. But he doesn't mind having other dogs around, and likes to play.
I have two cats who are used to dogs and don't mind them but don't really like to be chased about all the time.
I have a niece who's just over 2 who visits with me every second week-end, weho is very good with dogs, but is used to dogs who have been socialized with small kids and aren't afraid of her (but she's never left alone with the dog).
I take my current dog out to my parents' place every week so he can run free in their 40 acre field (only place where his recall doesn't suck) and would like the second dog to be able to do the same without bolting (not right away obviously but with training and patience).
I have a rather small apartment so less indoor energy is better.
I am not capable of dealing with a dog who was abused or has serious issues with resource guarding (mild issues I can probably work out with my trainer).
Any training issues like house breaking and leash manners I can teach through obedience classes.
I think I want something smaller, but more than 15 lbs, and only because they tend to need less exercise.
I'd prefer a breed or mix that is more easily trainable, not necessarily obedient, just trainable.

Just to give you an idea, I've been looking at and seem to think that pugs, basset hounds and English bulldogs might be a good match. But I'm open to suggestion. I'm starting now because if I go with a breeder, I really do need to start getting in touch with some now, as were looking at having our new addition next spring or summer, if possible.

erykah1310
August 12th, 2006, 10:59 AM
Well at least you are giving some time and alot of thought! THats good. However I think you are on the right track with finding an addition to your family and I am really pleased that you are considering a rescue.
I dont know what to tell you about breed or breed mix???? It entirely depends on you. You should consider fostering a few different dogs through a local rescue. THat way you can see first hand how the dog is going to fit your lifestyle.
Just a suggestion!

Good luck

Puppyluv
August 12th, 2006, 01:38 PM
Living in an apartment, a Bassett may not be your best choice, because they can tend to be howlers, and thus really piss off your neighbours. Pugs can be lovely dogs, my cousin has one and he is a sweetheart, but they can be VERY difficult to train. Raingirl could probably tell you all about the Bullies.

PetFriendly
August 12th, 2006, 03:13 PM
What I call an apartment is actually the lower level of a duplex, and its my boyfriend who lives upstairs and owns the place (and is in the midst of a messy reno job that is taking forever).

But good point about the howling. I wonder if that stays with the breed if its mixed with something (if I go the rescue route)?!

MERI
August 12th, 2006, 03:55 PM
I love bassets, but my basset is 60 pounds and can't go off leash. He just goes by his nose:dog: I heard that some bassets could walk off leash, but most of them couldn't. Otherwise bassets are great:thumbs up
I think fostering is a great idea. Good luck!

pamha
August 12th, 2006, 11:52 PM
What about a Boston? My brother has one & he is an excellant dog as far as getting along with everyone (human, canine & cats). As far as I know he was fairly easy to train & has enough energy to run with other dogs but doesn`t need a huge amount of exercise.

MyBirdIsEvil
August 13th, 2006, 12:48 AM
Just to give you an idea, I've been looking at and seem to think that pugs, basset hounds and English bulldogs might be a good match

Bassets and bulldogs aren't small dogs, they can both reach 60 lbs.

Bassets can get VERY loud, we're thinking about getting one for a 3rd dog when we get our own home, but we're going to live in the country, so if you have neighbors it may not be a great choice.

Bulldogs can be VERY high energy, so if you go that route make sure the dog you choose is known to be low energy. It would have to be an adult dog to be completely sure, because a puppy can be low energy when you get it then high energy as an adult.

I would recommend a collie (they can be 60+ lb dogs too though), they can be high energy when you want them to, and a lot of the time they're fairly low energy in the house, but like any dog there can be exceptions.

erykah1310
August 13th, 2006, 09:58 AM
I would recommend a collie (they can be 60+ lb dogs too though),

Thats a good idea, a little Shetland Sheepdog or something along those lines!!!

MyBirdIsEvil
August 13th, 2006, 12:03 PM
a little Shetland Sheepdog or something along those lines!!!

A rough collie, which is what I meant, is a lot calmer indoors, shelties are a little more highstrung than a collie, but I dunno much else about them.

LavenderRott
August 13th, 2006, 12:39 PM
To be honest, if I were in your position, I would look for a personality and not a breed. Personalities vary from dog to dog within a breed so looking for a specific breed might not find you what you want.

When it is time to get serious about looking, put a leash on your current dog and go looking! Stop at the local shelter and see what is there. Go to adoption events and see what is there. You might be surprised!

SnowDancer
August 13th, 2006, 02:53 PM
I agree with LavenderRott - look for personality. I also agree that a Bassett would not be the best choice - hounds in general love to howl - I have had several. We now have a 25 lb. American Eskimo - I most definitely would not suggest that you get an Eskie or a dog of the Spitz breed - or the cats will pack their bags.

Prin
August 13th, 2006, 04:00 PM
Shelties (and minpins) are known to bark incessantly- not great for an apartment, even if it is your man upstairs (he might stop being your man because of the barking lol).

Pugs are good friendly doggies, but are a little hard to housetrain (from the ones I know) and can have genetic issues involving the respiratory tract, elbows, among others, but every breed has its issues, so definitely keep researching..

phoenix
August 13th, 2006, 05:33 PM
Yes, keep researching... looking at different breed characteristics is a good idea, in my opinion... each dog does have its own personality, but you are more likely to find what you are looking for by narrowing it down to a couple of breeds. You aren't guaranteed to find the personality you're looking for, but you've got a better chance of it...especially with a puppy...

I don't really have any rec's... I like boston terriers, but I think they are pretty energetic.

~michelle~
August 13th, 2006, 05:36 PM
what about a shiba inu? they're relatively small and bark infrequently. they are calm indoors but love to play outside. plus they are the cutest things :)

Melei'sMom
August 13th, 2006, 07:00 PM
I know you said you were thinking about 15+ lbs. but for the other parts you describe I would suggest a Shih tzu or Shih tzu mix (some of them). Other then size, my Melei would be exactly what you are looking for, other then I would seriously harm anyone trying to take her :evil:

She is a shihtzu mix (bichon) and is under 10lbs. and other then a big dog problem (totally my fault though) she is fine with the nieghbourhood cats and everyone she meets, big or small with the exception of a few people and she has her reasons I am sure. We are working on the dog thing and she is doing amazing.

Her excersice is a fairly short walk and some energenic play with the kids a few times a day.

She is not 'yappy' but I have made sure from the beginning that barking is only for when she is told to. I understand that the shihtzu can be a very yappy dog if not trained right away. tricks and obidience was pretty painless but housetraining requires effort with this breed. and unless you are going to keep the coat very short, lots of grooming and prone to matting.

The other things to be aware of is the short snout and large eyes can cause some problems as stuff can irrate the eyes easily and some do snore and the associated respitory problems that can surface with a badly breed small dog.

But, Shihtzus are known for their freindly 'everyone loves me' personalities and they love to be treated like royalty:queen:

PetFriendly
August 13th, 2006, 07:06 PM
I agree with LavenderRott - look for personality.

I agree, but short of reading up on every breed there is I thought I would concentrate my efforts and a few (ok, maybe 10) :)

PetFriendly
August 13th, 2006, 07:07 PM
Bassets and bulldogs aren't small dogs, they can both reach 60 lbs.



I meant great dane mix huge, bulldogs and bassets, while larger aren't tall on their legs.

PetFriendly
August 13th, 2006, 07:12 PM
I know you said you were thinking about 15+ lbs. but for the other parts you describe I would suggest a Shih tzu or Shih tzu mix (some of them).

My Charley is a shih tzu mix! too funny. And I have the spitz family covered as he's mixed with pomeranian (and yes, the cats almost moved out), His mix though made for a great coat, nice and long but easy to keep tangle free. :D

I'll look into the shibas and bostons. I've never met a shelty that wasn't high strung and yappy... But maybe that's more to do with the owners than the breed. And while I could keep up with a collie, I'm not sure Charley could.

What about dobies, how high energy are they? I saw the most awsome looking one I've seen in a while at the pet store today, but again, I"m not sure Charley would be able to keep up with it.

Prin
August 13th, 2006, 10:43 PM
Don't get a dobie from a pet store! Breeders have worked so hard to "fix" the breed and have extended the life span from 7 to around 9 or 10 in just the past 10 years or so. A pet store dobie would definitely not last long. They are prone to so many illnesses that if you are going to go the pet store route, you would certainly be better off adopting a dobie (same risk).

Dobies can be very calm, more so after about 3 years, but some are very high strung, too.

PetFriendly
August 15th, 2006, 05:44 PM
Don't get a dobie from a pet store!

Pet store?! Oh heavens, I didn't put that into context very well did I :eek:

I saw the dobie at Petsmart with its owner who was shopping/looking (We were at PetSmart, which I guess is more a pet food store but since I don't shop at stores that actually sell animals I don't differentiate the two).

How long of a walk would a dobie need as a younger dog? And exactly what kind of work were they breed for (Ya, I could look it up but I'm sure someone can give me the Cole's notes version here ;) )

LavenderRott
August 15th, 2006, 06:05 PM
I know a woman who breeds Shiba's and they are not for the faint of heart! Very high energy and can be vocal.

Prin
August 15th, 2006, 06:37 PM
I think they were hunting dogs... I should know that, but honestly, I never chose to have dobies- they always just ended up with us.:D One of my dobies could be let out free and the other would bolt if you let him off leash for a second. But both were so sweet, affectionate and velcroey. They sort of mirror their owners- like if you have good intentions, they'll have good intentions too. As for exercise, when they're young they probably need about an hour a day minimum of good hard exercise, but as they get older, they need less and less. Our dobies were definitely less chewy than our labs were, but labs are exceptional chewers...:D They are also very prone to bloat so you have to take all the proper precautions for that. I've never met a dobie who didn't have a sensitive stomach either... :sick:

Puppyluv
August 15th, 2006, 07:07 PM
what about a shiba inu? they're relatively small and bark infrequently. they are calm indoors but love to play outside. plus they are the cutest things :)


Oh god, no! My aunt and uncle have had 6 shibas over the years. They love them dearly, but they are not good with other dogs, cats or children. Three of the prerequisites.

Frenchy
August 15th, 2006, 07:30 PM
I think you should get in touch with rescues near you.Explain to them your situation and what you are looking for in a dog (not the breed,the personality) maybe they have the perfect dog for you.Good luck!

Bushfire2000
August 15th, 2006, 07:39 PM
I think you should give the Shih Tzu another look the breed standard runs to 16 lbs (I think I haven't looked it up in a long time CKC standards were bigger than AKC) even though people are going for the smaller versions. I'm sure you could find one at the shelter that grewbigger than its owners expected and would be just the right size for you.

PetFriendly
August 16th, 2006, 05:07 PM
Oh god, no! My aunt and uncle have had 6 shibas over the years. They love them dearly, but they are not good with other dogs, cats or children. Three of the prerequisites.

I've kind of gathered that too... High strung, independant and barky... They aren't making the list, but they are cute and about the right size.

PetFriendly
August 16th, 2006, 05:15 PM
I think you should give the Shih Tzu another look the breed standard runs to 16 lbs...

I have a shih tzu mix, love him to pieces, but he isn't as big as I'd like the next one to be, that and I'm not crazy about the monthly grooming requirements. Brushing a few times a week is ok (and free since I do it myself!).

MyBirdIsEvil
August 16th, 2006, 06:07 PM
I have a shih tzu mix, love him to pieces, but he isn't as big as I'd like the next one to be, that and I'm not crazy about the monthly grooming requirements. Brushing a few times a week is ok (and free since I do it myself!).

I suggested a collie earlier, their grooming really isn't bad like you'd think.
They have long fur but it's not the soft fluffy fur like on other long haired dogs and it doesn't matt all that easy. My collie has gotten mud in his fur a few times and unless he's stinky he usually doesn't even need a bath, it just brushes out.
I think most of the sites I've read suggest a brushing about once a week normally.
Plus they're fairly easy to train (as long as you're not repetative), and they're active outside when you want them to be.

meant great dane mix huge, bulldogs and bassets, while larger aren't tall on their legs.

They're not short like a bulldog or basset but mine doesn't tend to do much in the house besides walk around some and sleep, and from what I've read most of them are similar.

I just have to watch that he doesn't get stuff off the counter (he's still only 8 months), because he won't actually get ON the kitchen counter but he'll walk along it with his muzzle laying on top of it and sniff for stuff, lol.

LibbyP
August 16th, 2006, 07:21 PM
What about a French Bulldog? They do have genetic problems but what breed doesn't and a good breeder will talk to you about everything, low grooming maintainance, not a high energy dog, small but not breakable with smaller children, I may be way off base but this was our second breed of choice before getting the big girl, found a really awesome breeder that I felt really comfortable with, I suggest if it's a PB you are looking for attend a dog show and see what catches your fancy,talk with some breeders, get their cards, check them out give them a call etc... good luck there are sooo many choices:fingerscr

Angies Man
August 19th, 2006, 07:16 PM
You know, I'm the poodle guy. I say get a miniature poodle. Don't get a dog that is quite a bit larger than your present dog--some big dogs don't see small dogs as anything more than prey--and an accident could be tragic.

Just another word about Mini's, they are smart, good companions, and easy to train and live with. Just like their larger cousins. Poodles generally do well in small houses and apartments.

I met an Italian Greyhound a few weeks ago. A tiny version of a Greyhound. Same deal as the Mini Poodles. All the nice qualities of a full size Greyhound, but in a much smaller package. Not good to have around a larger dog or a rambunctious kid, they have pretty delicate bones until fully grown, and even then can be hurt accidently by a larger dog (in just normal play.). And because they are so small and have such minimal fur, they need extra care in cold weather. But the one I met was pretty impressive, very calm, friendly to strangers, and seemed to be loving towards her owner's infant.

OntarioGreys
August 19th, 2006, 10:56 PM
I met an Italian Greyhound a few weeks ago. A tiny version of a Greyhound. Same deal as the Mini Poodles. All the nice qualities of a full size Greyhound, but in a much smaller package. Not good to have around a larger dog or a rambunctious kid, they have pretty delicate bones until fully grown, and even then can be hurt accidently by a larger dog (in just normal play.). And because they are so small and have such minimal fur, they need extra care in cold weather. But the one I met was pretty impressive, very calm, friendly to strangers, and seemed to be loving towards her owner's infant.


Some of the full grown ones will have very fragile bones, they are not recommended for those with very young children because bones can be so easily fractured, also any rescues would insist on letting loose only in fully fenced areas as they are a sighthound, with vision to spot movement over a mile away and like their big cousins love to chase which can result in them getting lost, like their bigger cousins they have very delicate skin which can get torn with playful nipping of another dogs toenails snagging the skin. Most are given up do to house training problems. And I would not recommend a whippet which is an inbetween size as they are quite active

A young pug would be a good choice, as they are sturdier and a low energy breed

PetFriendly
August 20th, 2006, 07:53 AM
A young pug would be a good choice, as they are sturdier and a low energy breed

Sturdy is a good word! I've looked up pugs, the breed doesn't seem to have any issues I can't live with. The bassets are a little higher energy than I thought, but nothing we can't oversome in our fenced yard!

Its time to start drafting a letter to the local and breed specific rescues. I'm going to see if anyone will consider me as a foster home and go from there.

Thanks all!