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Does anyone remember Michael Dunahee

Joey.E.CockersMommy
August 5th, 2006, 11:52 PM
Michael Dunahee was a little boy that was kidnapped in Victoria BC in 1991. He was kidnapped in a parking lot after a ball game and he was probably just a few feet from his parents. He was four years old at the time. So far he has never been found.

Until recently the police/investigators feel they have a strong lead. They may have found the people that kidnapped Michael and have been raising him as their own son. Apparently the police did one of those computereised images to see what he would look like today at age 19.

The experts say according to the news that Michael probably wont remember his real family which is really sad but the people that kidnapped him did a horrible thing and definately should pay for their consequences. :(

Joey.E.CockersMommy
August 5th, 2006, 11:58 PM
http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/news/story.html?id=c9357ed8-be3a-4d91-b88d-b2b667aaf492


Michael Dunahee tips 'encourage' police
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Font: * * * * Rob Shaw, Times Colonist
Published: Saturday, July 29, 2006
For the first time in a long time, Victoria police say they are "encouraged" and actively investigating about 10 solid tips from an avalanche of 550 into the disappearance of Michael Dunahee.

While they aren't divulging details, team commander Det.-Sgt. Al Cochrane said part of the investigation will likely include sending two Victoria detectives to a B.C. town.

In one tip, police were provided the first names of a couple with a small child, around the same age as Michael. The family was reported living in a B.C. town shortly after March 24, 1991, when Michael, then four years old, went missing from a playground at the old Blanshard Elementary School (now University Canada West).

"How do you find information from three first names 15 years ago?" said Cochrane. "That's going to take some time. We're probably going to send a couple of detectives to spend time in that town and dig and dig and dig."

Victoria police are committed to travelling wherever needed to follow up on what is the largest and most prominent case in department history, said Cochrane.

"I would say for the first time in a long time I'm also encouraged by some of the tips that have come in because there is some ... information we are working hard on," said Cochrane. "But saying that, I still haven't got that tip that I would say will absolutely send me in the direction that's going to solve the Michael Dunahee disappearance."

Police would not be more specific on other leads for fear of influencing the direction of future tips. Cochrane pointed to more than 3,500 tips about brown vans received in the past 15 years based on the erroneous suggestion such a vehicle may have been involved. It wasn't true; police discredited that idea in 1991, he said.

Cochrane said the 10 solid tips contain a group of leads that warrant further work. They will require officers to trace the whereabouts of key people, and also investigate possible sightings.

It continues to be a missing-person investigation until proven otherwise, said Cochrane.

Police offered a $100,000 reward for information as the case passed the 15-year mark in March. About 550 tips flooded in between March and July, and all but about 80 have been investigated, said Cochrane. They continue to arrive.

The prominent status of the case leads to tips from across North America.

"I got a tip on my desk today from Kentucky where some people from Victoria saw a picture down in Kentucky they say looks exactly like the enhanced photographs of Michael Dunahee," Cochrane said. "So now I'm trying to get a hold of that photograph and what the origins of it are."

At peak times, as many as 20 officers tackled the tips. They referred to the 14,000 pieces of paper in 12 cabinet drawers that make up the original case file.

But this has been an unusually busy year for homicides in Victoria -- there have been three -- and most detectives have found themselves pulled to work on them. The July 16 killing of James Allanach remains an open investigation.

After years of ups and downs, the Dunahee family no longer asks for updates on every tip because it has been frustrating to watch them fall apart, said Michael's mother, Crystal.

Still, the family appreciates the hard work of police, she said. "I know they're still looking, and that's the main thing."

Tips can still be made at 995-7444

Cathy1
August 6th, 2006, 10:41 AM
I always thought about him because we were visiting B.C when we heard of his disappearance. I hope the boy is him. I just feel sorry that his real family are going to be strangers to him. I hope the kidnappers pay for what they have done to this family.

rainbow
August 6th, 2006, 03:30 PM
While they aren't divulging details, team commander Det.-Sgt. Al Cochrane said part of the investigation will likely include sending two Victoria detectives to a B.C. town.

In one tip, police were provided the first names of a couple with a small child, around the same age as Michael. The family was reported living in a B.C. town shortly after March 24, 1991, when Michael, then four years old, went missing from a playground at the old Blanshard Elementary School (now University Canada West).

"How do you find information from three first names 15 years ago?" said Cochrane. "That's going to take some time. We're probably going to send a couple of detectives to spend time in that town and dig and dig and dig."

I don't understand why the police would disclose that information. I mean, if you were those people, wouldn't you move away if you thought the police were onto you.

Maya
August 6th, 2006, 06:27 PM
Yes I live near the park where he was taken from and always think of him when I pass by. I'm not sure why it is such a high profile case it is still in the papers quite often. It would be pretty amazing if they found him after all this time. I think if he is alive he might be able to remember something, I remember stuff from when i was only two.

[edit] That is odd the police would say "We're probably going to send a couple of detectives to spend some time in that town and dig and dig and dig." It almost seems like the case is more show than for real any more but I don't really know what the point of that would be.