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My Cats Fur is Matted

Feline
August 2nd, 2006, 02:50 PM
Hi,
My precious cat Cleo is a longhaired grey cat with the most unusual eyes I've ever seen. She has developed a problem with her fur now and I don't know how or what to do for her. Her fur is so matted, actually clumped in spots, I can't bear to see it an I'm sure she is as uncomfortable as she looks. I already gave her bath, but that was as horrible an ordeal for both of us. I'm on disability so my budget is quite limited, so I can't take her to a cat grooming place because of the high prices. A friend of mine has given me a pet trimmer kit but it's for a dog and I'm not sure if it will help Cleo. Before I try, I'm hoping someone can give me some advice on the problem. Cleo is an indoor cat, has no fleas, has all her shots and I clip her nails and try to brush her hair regular. She is also fixed. Is there anyone out there that can help Cleo and I with this dilemma? Please reply soonest. Thank you from Cleo and I. Before I forget, a little information as to why this happened and how it could be avoided in the future would help too.

chico2
August 2nd, 2006, 04:24 PM
Feline,yes matts can cause a lot of discomfort in a longhaired cat,even infections,it's like somebody is pulling your hair constantly:sad:
I would think a bath would have worsend her matts,but don't blame yourself.
The only thing I can think of,is have the vet shave her,but if you cannot afford it,very carefully cut away the matts,with small scissors,it also depends how severe the matts are..
A friend of mine has the same problem with his cat,but he ended up having the cat shaved and is now grooming him every day with a matt-comb,the only way I know of to prevent matts.
Maybe your regular vet can help out,by letting you pay monthly,since you are on disability:fingerscr
It is definetly a problem that needs to be solved,before it causes problems with her skin.Good Luck!!

Cinnabear
August 3rd, 2006, 01:08 AM
Like Chico says you can cut the matts out. Just a little piece of fur at a time. Or you can try to shave the fur off, I do this with my cat, she is so docile with the clippers. Long hair cats has a tendency to matt if not groomed regularly. Good luck to you.

Prin
August 3rd, 2006, 01:45 PM
It is very uncomfortable for the kitty to have clumps like that (constant pulling). You can try shaving her yourself but be careful as the shavers get hot really quickly and can burn the skin. If you can't do it, you can ask a groomer to try. If the cat isn't nice while you're shaving, a vet can shave her under anaesthetic (more pleasant for the cat, less risk of cutting her but more risk or side-effects from the anaesthetic).

MyBirdIsEvil
August 3rd, 2006, 06:12 PM
Some places sell conditioners and sprays that you can put on knots to get them out, but if the knots are extremely bad these won't really work.
If you can get the knots apart at all by gently pulling them apart with your hands, the conditioner or spray might work.
If you don't feel comfortable shaving your cat, you could try at least cutting some of the knots out with scissors, this would alleviate some of the discomfort to your kitty until you can get her to someone who can shave the rest off.
Just some advice though, once you get all the knots out and her hair is growing back, you MUST comb her every day. Just brushing a cat with unmanageable fur won't normally keep them from getting knots, you NEED to get a comb. Also you could use the conditioning spray I mentioned to keep the fur from matting as bad.
Here's an example of a detangling spray:

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/Product/Prod_Display.cfm?pcatid=14285&N=2002+113843

I'm not recommending you buy this brand, just using it as an example.
A lot of companies make similar sprays, and if you ask at your local pet store or groomer, they should also be able to recommend something.

vfrohloff
August 4th, 2006, 08:31 AM
I don't know about where you live, but around here it costs $25 to have a cat shaved. This is without anesthesia, and there are places that will do it without putting the cat under. You could try cutting the mats out but be very careful because if you cut her you may have to pay for a trip to the vet. This also won't prevent new mats from forming. I don't recommend using a trimmer yourself, they are designed for people who know how to use them and you could take a chunk of her skin off. Your cat really needs to be shaved, it is cruel to make her live with mats. She is likely in constant pain and runs the risk of developing skin infections. After you have her shaved you should try to brush her every day, and use a long toothed comb. The cat brushes they sell these days don't get down to the fur near the skin and that's where the mats start. Good luck!

H.P.
August 4th, 2006, 05:55 PM
Shaving a cat with clippers is tricky, it is really easy to get the skin caught and end up with a huge cut. Much easier than with a dog. You can try cutting them out with scissors, but again, be careful not to catch the skin. you could also try splitting them: stick the point of one blade of the scissors in just below the matt (hold the mat up to avoid stabbing kitty), then cut the mat in half, sometimes you can do this and then get it to comb out (with large matts you can split them several times before trying to comb out) Just be careful what ever you try, and it might help to have someone else hold kitty while you cut (or visa-versa)

muckypup
August 4th, 2006, 06:23 PM
I would highly recommend not trying to shave your kitty! ...or cut the mats out with scissors. It is so easy to accidently cut the skin (because it is paper thin) especially if the matts are really tight to the skin.

You are going to have to comb (metal comb/greyhound comb) the matts out and unfortunately your cat is going to be bald where the matts were. Once you get him totally matt free I would suggest brushing him every day.
Matts on cats come out easy it just takes time. Hold on to the hair between the skin and the matt so the combing doesn't pull at his skin and cause discomfort or pain. You have to pick at cat matts, keep separating and splitting the matt open with the comb then and work your way from the outside/edges of the matt to the inside.

Good luck

chico2
August 5th, 2006, 07:05 AM
My cat Rocky who is a shorthaired cat,gets small matts at times,impossible to comb out,but when he is sleeping I can quickly but very carefully cut them out,luckily it does not happen to often,but it shows the importance of grooming your cats regularly,even DSH cats.
I also urge caution in cutting out matts,a slip if the cats move and most cats do,can easily happen.

vfrohloff
August 5th, 2006, 08:26 AM
You are going to have to comb (metal comb/greyhound comb) the matts out and unfortunately your cat is going to be bald where the matts were. Once you get him totally matt free I would suggest brushing him every day.
Matts on cats come out easy it just takes time


Sorry muckypup, but I really don't agree with you. I have owned long haired cats for most of my life and I never had one whose mats came out easily. Once they are matted to that point the only real solution is to either cut the mats out or have the cat shaved. If the cat is going to be bald where the mats were it means the mats were pulled out, not combed out. This is very painful for the cat.

muckypup
August 5th, 2006, 04:18 PM
If the cat is going to be bald where the mats were it means the mats were pulled out, not combed out.

If you pull them out, you pull them out, and yes that is painful. How can the hair still grow with matts plastered to it's skin like a carpet? That's why they're bald underneath.
If you do it properly it is not painful but takes a lot of time and patients which often isn't something that people with such severely matted cats have a lot of in the first place.
Matts are very painful for cats and dogs. Those that are worried about their cat or dog being in pain shouldn't let them get so matted.

vfrohloff
August 6th, 2006, 09:14 AM
If you do it properly it is not painful but takes a lot of time and patients which often isn't something that people with such severely matted cats have a lot of in the first place.


I'm not trying to cause problems here, but I am offended by this comment. It so happens I have a long haired cat who was rescued because she was badly abused by her previous owner. Brushing her is just not an option (believe me, I've tried) as it is physically dangerous for me and psychologically traumatizing for her. She gets matted and I have her shaved every year. This has nothing to do with time or patience, in fact it takes an awful lot of time and patience to take on abused animals.