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New Dog Owner - Yikes

mevans
August 1st, 2006, 10:48 PM
I'm realizing I'm a total novice on training dogs here. I have owned dogs before but have never owned them from puppyhood. I recently acquired a mixed-breed terrier who is now 3 months old. She's been a great dog so far - good temperament with the kids and even the other animals in the house.

I'm trying to train her to walk on a leash. Having no experience at doing this, I am currently doing the following:

- Leaving a collar on her all the time so she gets used to that
- Putting the leash on when I take her out in the morning.

The problem is when I take her out she pretty much just wants to lay down on the front lawn and go to sleep. This will be a very fat dog if this trend continues.

Any thoughts on how to get poor Abby excited about going for a walk?

Prin
August 1st, 2006, 11:01 PM
Is it super hot where you are? Maybe it's the heat that's slowing her down..

OntarioGreys
August 2nd, 2006, 05:07 AM
if you have car traffic going by( the motion and noise) can be very intimidating I have a lot of traffic in front of my home, even a new area can be scary for them

With pups I usually start by driving or carrying them to a nearby park as they starting becoming comfortable there I start walking them home from the park

The other thing is just spent some time out in the front yard at first get them used to just being out front and they begin to get comfortable with walking arount the front yard on leash , gradually start walking a little ways from home, gradually building distance

rainbow
August 2nd, 2006, 12:44 PM
You could try having a few treats in your hand and coaxing her that way. :D

Yanagi
August 3rd, 2006, 02:20 AM
Maybe you should start by walking her around the house then outside or let her walk around the house with the leash on so she gets used to the leash... Maybe...

tenderfoot
August 3rd, 2006, 12:26 PM
So does she even try to go potty? or is this an immediate reaction?

Good suggestion to have the leash on in the house attached to you. This will start to teach her leash manners without worrying about the heat or traffic noises.

If she stops you just keep GENTLY pulling forward the micro-second she comes towards you you have to go to a loose leash and PRAISE. This teaches her that giving to the pressure feels good and that joining up with you feels good. Otherwise if you stop when she stops she learns that stopping works and that she is in control of you and the walk (or lack there of).

You should try to keep your energy positive and encouraging. It might be that she is over whelmed - but through good, confident leadership on your part she can learn to face her fears and gain confidence.

Buddy's Heart
August 3rd, 2006, 06:51 PM
A terrier that will lie down, this is good!
And at such an early age!

Walking on a leash to a puppy is forced exercise.
They do not walk like us.
They trot and sniff, trot and sniff.

See it's not about walking on leash, in your dog's mind it's about who's in charge !
“I don't do what you want”; “I don't go where you want” !
Proof they are thinking this is that, they are lying down !
This stops you; this is how they are taking charge, disempowering you.
Personally, I think a lot of owners do structural damage to young dogs by forcing them to walk on leash at too young an age.

A question I would ask you:
Will your dog move with you off leash ?
If not here is your problem.
Try bringing your dogs dinner with you on the walk
Make your walk extremely short
You’re trying to go too far, too fast.
Forget about exercise, your dog can get all the exercise they need in your apartment, house or back yard.
The walk is about the relationship between you and your dog.
Early socialization, introducing your pup to the world, is highly over rated.
Especially if they’re already arguing with you before you even get to socializing.
Sounds like you’re creating a teenager.

If your dog will not follow you off leash:
Try tying your dog to the kitchen door while you’re in the room eating or doing dishes.
End the session when the dog curls up.
If you feel you need to help the dog, go and sit with them near the door, show them there is no pressure on there neck there !

If you must walk the dog on leash:
You’re going to have to visually pick a location, hurry to that location, stop fuss over your dog, play.
Location should be 10 – 15 feet apart, rest/play time should be 30 seconds to one minute.
Don’t stop for the dog!
I don’t care if you have to drag them at first.
The dog learns to start with you and stop with you; it’s not the other way around!

My dogs are always taught to move with me off leash first, then I teach them how to walk on leash.
In auto mechanics they say “you can make a smart engine slow but you can’t make a slow engine smart!”
In mechanics they are referring to fuel injection, in dog training I’m saying “if they can’t do it off leash, they can’t do it on !” :crazy:

From a friend of mine, with over 26 years of experience.

tenderfoot
August 4th, 2006, 09:31 AM
Buddy wrote - "My dogs are always taught to move with me off leash first, then I teach them how to walk on leash. "

Really great points Buddy, but just a note - walking off leash is totally different than learning to give to pressure on a collar.

If you were walking holding hands with someone and they pulled you in a direction you would naturally resist at first even if its for a fraction of a second. If that person stopped when you resisted you would learn resisting works. If that person continued to gently walk forward and then you finally took a step and that person smiled and said thanks and the pressure on your hand disappeared. You would understand they just want you to come with them and that coming with them felt better than resisting.

I just wanted to make sure that you understood that puppies naturally follow their people because it keeps them safe in the world. But as pups grow they don't follow as well because they are becoming independent. So we start using the leash and suddenly they resist. Its because we never really taught them to be with us (for the most part) they just happened to choose it and we thought Great Puppy! But put that collar on and you have a whole new lesson to teach.

Puppyluv
August 4th, 2006, 10:16 AM
Forget about exercise, your dog can get all the exercise they need in your apartment, house or back yard.
The walk is about the relationship between you and your dog.
Early socialization, introducing your pup to the world, is highly over rated.
.

I disagree, socialization is essential, and NOT overrated. Walks are about exercising your dog, time spent in the house/apartment/yard is not sufficient for exercise unless you are dealing with a toy breed. The time at home is about your relationship between you and your dog.

LavenderRott
August 4th, 2006, 11:26 AM
“if they can’t do it off leash, they can’t do it on !”


That is a really great theory, but I would really hate to find out that my dog won't come off leash as he is headed for a busy street.

Sorry, in my house the dogs learn to walk on leash long before they are taken outside off leash.

Prin
August 4th, 2006, 02:46 PM
I disagree, socialization is essential, and NOT overrated. Walks are about exercising your dog, time spent in the house/apartment/yard is not sufficient for exercise unless you are dealing with a toy breed. The time at home is about your relationship between you and your dog.
I agree completely. The world is a scary place and going for walks where there are dogs, people, cars, etc going by while the dog is reassured and confident helps socialize the dog in a good way.

The more socialized a dog is, the more flexible they are in new situations. You're less likely to end up at the vet saying "Oh, don't touch him there, he doesn't like that," or "Oh, can't a woman vet tech hold him? He doesn't like men." That kind of thing is avoided and a more rounded doggy results.

Try bringing your dogs dinner with you on the walk Why? So he can eat under pressure and stress? I don't get that part, especially since dogs aren't supposed to eat 1hr before and after exercise (bloat).

MyBirdIsEvil
August 4th, 2006, 10:48 PM
Ummm, not worrying about socialization is bad, especially if you live in a place where there are lots of people or other dogs. Even if you don't, socialization is good because your dog will always have to go somewhere and deal with new people eventually (such as the vet, the groomer, a kennel if you ever have to keep them there while you're away).
I've seen dogs that were not socialized, and it normally leads to barking at strangers, fear of strangers, and in a worst case scenario trying to bite someone.
A non-socialized dog can also become posessive of what they consider their territory, i.e. your house or yard. Therefore when someone new comes in (even if you invited them) they could resort to barking or even biting.
Both of my dogs were socialized from early puppyhood (one of them more than the other because I got her at 6 weeks, the other at 4 months), and I cannot see any downsides to it, as despite any other problems they might have they have NEVER been agressive or fearful towards strangers, and both of them just LOVE going to the vet (go figure, lol) as I took them there a lot to do their socialization with people. :rolleyes: It probably helped that the vet tech gives them a doggy treat every time.