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To All The Kids Who Were Born In The

mastifflover
July 13th, 2006, 02:12 PM
TO ALL THE KIDS WHO WERE BORN IN THE

1930's 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's !!

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while they carried us.

They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can, and didn't get tested for diabetes.

Then after that trauma, our baby cribs were covered with bright colored lead-based paints.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took hitchhiking.

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags.

riding in the back of a pick up on a warm day was always a special treat.

We drank water from the garden hose and NOT from a bottle.

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE actually died from this.

We ate cupcakes, white bread and real butter and drank soda pop with sugar in it, but we weren't overweight because......

[/SIZE="5"]WE WERE ALWAYS OUTSIDE PLAYING!![/SIZE]

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on.

No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K.

We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all, no 99 channels on cable, no video tape movies, no surround sound, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet or Internet chat rooms..........WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no
lawsuits from these accidents.

We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, and the worms did not live in us forever.

We were given BB guns for our 10th birthdays,

made up games with sticks and tennis balls and although we were told it would happen, we did not put out very many eyes.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just yelled for them!

Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law!

This generation has produced some of the best risk!-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever!

The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned

HOW TO

DEAL WITH IT ALL!

And YOU are one of them!

CONGRATULATIONS!

You might want to share this with others who have had the luck to grow up as kids, before the lawyers and the government regulated our lives for our own good.

and while you are at it, forward it to your kids so they will know how brave their parents were.

Kind of makes you want to run through the house with scissors, doesn't it?!

technodoll
July 13th, 2006, 02:19 PM
right ON!!! :thumbs up

CyberKitten
July 13th, 2006, 02:46 PM
Hmmm. I'd best not comment on that. Treated too many kids who were killed by riding in the back of a pickup. I did drink pop tho and did not get overweight - mostly because I did not spend time in front of the TV (We had one French channel early on) or video games. My mother however, watched spray planes (DDT) and as a result I was born with many medical issues. So I don't look too fondly on that era for that reason.

I have been treating the results of that era - a greater increase in cancer amg childern of that era for many yrs. Check out the Strntium 90 Project. I do think we were healthier in some ways but I think we have come a long way. (Tho that accident in Quebec where the child lost his legs in that swimming pool is chilling!).

I never owned a BB gun but my cousin did and he lost an eye. So did a neighbour. My brother, in the days pre helmuts for bikles (I cringe when I see kids sans helmuts!) had a serious bike accident but he lived. And I was absolutely appalled to learn so many Canadians do not use seatbelts - they save lives!!!!

I do deal with this - every day!!!!

It was a simpler time but while I don't think we should be overprotective, the safety laws we have now exist for a reason and they do indeed save lives. Can you tell I have served on many of those committees, lol (and still lobby the govt about safety issues.) You would too if you spent even one night as a pediatrian in an ER!

I won't even mention how child abuse never got reported in those earlier halcyon days.


I did like the simpler life - at least where I grew up, it was safe in terms of ppl looking out for one another. We still do that in Maritimes tho Hfx seems to be seeing an increase in crime, sigh!!

dogmelissa
July 13th, 2006, 03:49 PM
What about me? I was born in 1980. I didn't grow up with all of the stuff that you talk about, and I did a lot of the stuff that you say you did.

I was born to a cigarette/coffee addict. Thankfully, she didn't drink while pregnant--I think by the time I was born, they'd figured out this was bad. I remember being in baby seat, but we rode, not just in the back of a pickup truck (only on the farm) but in the camper (sans seat belts) for many many years.
I ate worms and dirt, and my sister even ate previously-chewed gum at the park. I climbed trees and fell out of most of them, but never broke bones or teeth. I rode my bike (until my teenage years) without a helmet--probably should have broken my head a few times though.
I didn't build go-carts, but did toboggan down the hill in front of my house and out into the street (not intentionally) until Dad parked the truck in the way so we wouldn't go down the road (cars couldn't stop either!).
I drank water from the hose, and still prefer it that way. Shared everything else with my friends, but rarely had pop--the sugar made us crazy, not fat.
Didn't play video games or computer games or spend hours on the internet until much later in life, though we did have an (now archaic) video game system from the time I was quite young.
The only show I watched on a regular basis was Sesame Street, and as long as it's on TV, I'll be encouraging my kids to watch it, too (when I have them). TV/movies were a treat, not an everyday thing.
And I went unsupervised to the park with my friends in the summer.

But what you're missing is that people who were the age you are now, in that era, actually cared about each other and watched out for each other's kids. Now, your neighbour is as likely to kidnap and torture your child as help them if they fall and scrape their knee (ok that's a bit of an exaggeration).

Yes, the era ending in the 70s has produced some great thinkers, risk takers, etc, but it's also produced drug dealers, murderers, rapists and child pornographers (when was the last time you heard of a 20 yr old being arrested for being a notorious child molester?). Sure, you didn't have as many allergies, asthma or trips to the emergency room, but you also lost many of your siblings and friends to accidents, illnesses that went undiagnosed, and things that we don't see anymore, like polio & smallpox. Earlier generations had to produce 14+ children to see 5 of them reach adulthood. Now, children who medically shouldn't live are being treated and are getting better and living full rich lives, despite medical conditions that even 10 years ago would have been a death sentence.
I don't want to start a debate... but I agree with both mastifflover & cyberkitten. I can see both sides of it. I've grown up with one leg in each era, and while I enjoy the modern conveniences of our current society (internet, TV, cell phones), I also enjoy getting away from it sometimes and escaping to a "simpler" time. I don't agree with "educational" video games--hand those kids a Choose Your Adventure book and put them outside under a tree! Put a cell phone in their pocket so you can call them when it's suppertime. I agree with bike helmets, but not in allowing your kids to go unsupervised to the park on their bikes--a little girl died a few years ago here, when her bike helmet got caught in the monkey bars and she strangled to death. An adult present, and a cell phone to call 911, would have saved her life.

Anyways... I agree there's lots of things to celebrate about the 50 year span that you're talking about, but in 30 more years, maybe you'll see reasons to celebrate the 50 years since 1979. There are bad things about every era. I noticed that you omitted the 2 world wars, the explosion at Chernobyl and the Nazi regime. You've also omitted good things, like the invention of the car, telephone and robotic industry. Celebrate the fact that without computers and the internet, you wouldn't have pets.ca to visit!

That's my 2 cents... for what it's worth.
Melissa

Schwinn
July 13th, 2006, 08:16 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tongue_in_cheek

Just in case, you know, some people need a reference...:rolleyes:

Schwinn
July 13th, 2006, 08:17 PM
Oh, and working with a charity that deals with abused children, there are plenty of molestor's who are in thier 20's, unfortunatly. Scum is ageless.

technodoll
July 13th, 2006, 08:20 PM
thanks schwinn,,, i was starting to feel lonely giggling all by myself! :o

mastifflover
July 13th, 2006, 08:23 PM
Yeah I thought it was funny I did not mean it to offend anyone Oops

jesse's mommy
July 13th, 2006, 08:35 PM
Thanks Schwinn. I thought it was really funny too. :p

mona_b
July 13th, 2006, 08:48 PM
I second that right on.....:highfive:

I'm sorry,but it is soooooo true.And I grew up in the 60's...Ok,late 60's....:D

CK,I know people who have died while having the seatbelt on.One being an ex who was also a cop.His seatbelt got stuck and his Jeep blew up.He was still ALIVE before it blew.I was the one who had to tell his mother her only child had died.And it was the seatbelt that killed him.:mad:

I do deal with this - every day!!!!


Guess what?So do I...And what I see at times is worse then what you do.

Prin
July 13th, 2006, 09:01 PM
dogmelissa, I don't know where you grew up but my neighbors didn't look out for us at all. The only difference was, they weren't expected to. Instead of whining "why aren't my neighbors watching my kids?" our parents said, "Don't talk to strangers or they'll kidnap you and torture you. So watch out. Ok go play outside alone.":D And the ever popular "Don't cross the street or you'll get hit by a car and die a painful death." :thumbs up

Yes, the era ending in the 70s has produced some great thinkers, risk takers, etc, but it's also produced drug dealers, murderers, rapists and child pornographers (when was the last time you heard of a 20 yr old being arrested for being a notorious child molester?). Sure, you didn't have as many allergies, asthma or trips to the emergency room, but you also lost many of your siblings and friends to accidents, illnesses that went undiagnosed, and things that we don't see anymore, like polio & smallpox. Earlier generations had to produce 14+ children to see 5 of them reach adulthood.

There were just as many child molesters and rapists back then, only nobody talked about it. Now, whenever something happens, you see it on the news 10 minutes later before the media is even sure of what actually happened.

This year in Montreal, you'd think it was the "year of the home invasion". Home invasions are on the news all the time and it's scaring people. The truth is, there have been less this year than last year and last year nobody cared. The media tells us what to be afraid of but if they didn't say it, it doesn't mean it wasn't there.

And the reason you don't hear much about 20 year old child molesters is partly because of the youth protection act. If the molester is 20, chances are the crime was committed before the 18th birthday, in which case, the media is very limited in what it can report.

As for illnesses and miscarriages- I think you're going too far back there... At the turn of the century maybe, but not in the 50's and 60's. I think women actually had healthier births in the 50's and 60's than they do today. So many women these days are infertile or get pregnant but can't carry to term. Not smoking or drinking doesn't matter if your eggs aren't viable anyway.

And on that, my mom smoked and drank endless coffee when she was preggers with me too. But she also stopped working when she got pregnant (not at 8.5 months like most women do now) because back then, one salary was almost enough. The new moms might not smoke or might take multivitamins or whatever, but that doesn't do squat if the mom is stressed out all the time and eating processed foods laced with hormones and things that they didn't have as much of back in the day.

All that to say, it goes both ways. Each generation has its pros and cons and none of us can say we did it better.

joeysmama
July 14th, 2006, 07:22 PM
Well of course there are some things on this list that have changed for the better (I'm glad I had seatbelts and safety seats for my children) but I choose to take this in the spirit in which it was intended and enjoy it as a trip down memory lane. :)

I remember being outside playing with nothing more than our imaginations for hours on end. I was telling my daughter just the other day how no one had air conditioning in their cars when we were ittle. On a hot summer day you got where you going with your hair matted into a mess because you had all the windows open in the car. But I still love the memory of that. The feel of the wind and how we could tell when we were getting near the shore because you could smell it in the air.

It would never have occurred to us to play indoors in the nice weather or to watch television in the summer. There was nothing on in the day time but soap operas.

Kids weren't over scheduled then either. We had "down time". The whole summer was just for playing.

I understand where you're coming from CK, but I don't think anyone intended to suggest that we throw the kids in the back of the pick up for a ride--just that maybe it might be nice to remember some of the "every day feel" of our childhoods.

erykah1310
July 16th, 2006, 10:25 AM
Well Mastifflover i think it was cute and I was born in 1980 and remember riding in the box of a pickup ALL THE TIME in the summer! Up and down the camp roads. I also remember being 12 and driving my dads mustang to the store down the road for him. I had a bb gun, still have 2 eyes so does my neighbour, and so on.
The panick with seeing injuries related to the things on the list are realistic but not everyone was hurt. And think about it, how many injuries have y'all seen with kids on swing sets, teeter totters, hockey/baseball games, and general kid fun???? the truth here is KIDS GET HURT. I know riding in the back of a pick up down the highway at 100+kms/hr is a REALLY bad idea, but i still see kids in the back of pickups going by my house on their way to the lakes!!! Daily.
I know " if they ever got into an accident...." but not everyone who does things like this does.

joeysmama
July 16th, 2006, 11:30 AM
Well Mastifflover i think it was cute

Me too !! Thanks for sharing !:)

CyberKitten
July 16th, 2006, 01:27 PM
I did not mean to take issue with it - I like Mona (and yes, I am sure you have seen all kinds of horrible things, it is all part of our work I guess but I dare not whine since I did choose to do it. My dad would say the crying room is in the corner, lol) see too many bad things. But there is some truth to it having been if not a safer time then at least more innocent in some ways (so much we did not know I guess.)

I agree with you Schwinn - "scum" come in every age and generation unfortunately. The difference is now we actually do try to do someting about it even tho I know we never save every child. (I wish we could but the fact is we don't.)

I'd actually like to say I have rode in the back of a pickup truck since my grandparents had a farm and thus had one but I was never allowed. I did however, lay in the back seat without seat belts and watch out the back window - all things we would be agast at now. We have a program at our hospital (I think most pediatric and obstetric hospitals do) where parents receive a baby seat before they leave the hospital and a safety course. And most i think use it - tho a recent survey showed many Cdns do not wear seatsbelts and we know they do indeed save lives (even tho yes, ppl have been killed while wearing them). I would not be typing if I NOT had been wearing mine when Bullwinkle decided to come through my windshield a few yrs ago. But that is anectodal. etc, lol

Even as I lobby the NS govt about children driving ATV's, I myself as a 12 yr old drove a skidoo!!! (with a helmut tho - however much that would have helped!). I once drove it up a tree and my sisters and friends once tied a tobaggan on the end of it and drove it up and down some serious hills. Doubtless, my parents would have "killed" us if you pardon the pun had they known but they never found out. (A cute guy came along and helped remove aforementioned snowmobile from said tree, lol) I do know people - incl children - who have been killed in snowmobile accidents. With adults, often alcohol is involved. With children, they often were not wearing a helmet or driving too fast.

I never wore a helmet driving my bike - and I drove bikes everywhere (even while in univ in Hfx and Boston, I pedaled a bike to class often - and that esp in Boston was taking my life into my hands and wheels!!!) I had a bike accident only once amazingly and unlike my brother, it was not serious. My brakes gave out while I was going down a steep hill. I manouvered the bike into a ditch. I still have the faded scars to show for it but it could have been worse. I am thinking of buying a bike actually - some nostalgic thing, lol (and a helmet of course!!)

I shudder also when I recall being left in charge in much smaller children by one of my grandmothers - I was maybe 10-12 and while I was a good swimmer with all the requisite courses, we were on "the river" and anything could have happened. Today, we would be quite indignent if a parent or graudian had left a young child caring for 4 or 5 young children in the water like that.

So while I do deal with the problems from that era, I do look back some of my adventures with fondness. We did have such horrible dentists tho, lol (I still have dental phobia and of course, wouldn't you know it, while I was undergoing chemo, I had a tooth infection and had to see the dentist!!) Practicing what you preach is not always easy but I did have the tooth taken out and an implant replaced it. So I sometimes think we had the combo of lots of candy (my grandparents lived near a small store that sold penny candy (hard to find that now, lol - oh you can get the candy but it is not 5 for a penny, lol) and God awful dentists. (My apologies to the wonderful dentists I know now, lol)

I loved Boston Baked Beans and they are so hard to find in Canada - in Hfx, there are 2 stores that sell them for a huge markup (what is 25 cents is sold for 75 at one and the other it's $1) tho my parents can get them for me in the US at The Dollar Tree (if anyone knows that franchise) for $1 (obviously, lol) for 4 times as much. I only eat a few at a time since I savour them so, lol

We also fished in the river, oblivious to mercury pollution tho we did not eat them.

Anyway - it's not that I do not have fond memories but when I 1st read this post, I had lost 2 patients (I know how hard it is to tell ppl their loved ones have died Mona) and one - who I have become quite attached to (I know we should not do that but it happens) is very ill. Mona, I also did CPR on a close friend who was murdered so I have seen some awful things. (She was almost decapitated). I could go on but I won't - I am sure you like me have moments you would rather not think about in your line of work.

I do like the music, the sitcoms and the candy from the 60's and 70's, lol (even if I grew up in the 70's, lol)

dtbmnec
July 16th, 2006, 02:05 PM
First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while they carried us.

My mother never did either. She did apparently eat a lot of pizza. Probably would explain why I like it so much now :p

They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can, and didn't get tested for diabetes.

O.o This one is news to me...

Then after that trauma, our baby cribs were covered with bright colored lead-based paints.

I don't remember bright colors but I'm sure it probably wasn't a good paint job.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took hitchhiking.

There are days when *I* can't get into the medicine bottles (it was funny when mom would try to open the Tylenol blister pack and couldn't). I was told to not open doors/cabinets so I never had this issue. Always wore a helmet. Never hitchhiked (I lived in a small town for most of my life, where was I gonna hitchhike to???)

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags.

OMG you mean air bags weren't normal?! :p

We drank water from the garden hose and NOT from a bottle.

Yes and when we played in the kiddie pool and ended up drinking some of that evil hose water we didn't die either!

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE actually died from this.

You mean I was supposed to die from that?

We ate cupcakes, white bread and real butter and drank soda pop with sugar in it, but we weren't overweight because......[/SIZE="5"]WE WERE ALWAYS OUTSIDE PLAYING!![/SIZE]

Cupcakes and white bread I *STILL* eat (same with the butter). I don't think I ever really had soda pop. I had no choice but to go outside and I remember getting grounded and hating having to be INSIDE. But oh the back 40 was fun! Lots of trees and icky things.

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on.

Lol if there were any bad guys a) they wouldn't have lasted long because it was like cop city and b) they'd have had to track us through woods (not to mention *find* us)!

No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K.

I'm here aren't I?

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all, no 99 channels on cable, no video tape movies, no surround sound, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet or Internet chat rooms..........WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found them!

Yep. I have no friends now. It sucks. lol. Actually people are starting to get worried because the "new generation" is losing their person to person social skills because they communicate through electronics. Doesn't make for a good party now does it? *beeps and whirrs and glasses clinking*

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents.

My parents probably would have lauged at me if I suggested (or anyone else suggested) suing someone over that! Now people are winning tons of money from it. Yeesh.

We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, and the worms did not live in us forever.

I remember making mud pies but not actually eating it. Then again I'm sure there was some "splash effect" upon making them so I guess I did! I hated worms but as a child had a thing for ants. In fact I used to run up to mom holding out my hand saying "present" because I'd picked up an ant and killed it and took it to mom. Took me about six times to get my point across (mom followed me finally because she couldn't figure it out) because the ants kept falling off my hands.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just yelled for them!

Walking? What is this form of excersise? You mean treadmills didn't exist?

The rest of it I didn't do/didn't have happen to me so I can't comment on those. :)

Megan

P.S. if you haven't noticed I find it funny!

CyberKitten
July 16th, 2006, 02:20 PM
I still eat butter too - not much of it mind you (none on sandwiches - some idiosycracy, lol) - but I loathe margarine. So it's a little fat, how much worse can it be than Boston Baked Beans candy, lol

I do however drink bottled water - I like the flavoured stuff with splenda tho (some yrs from now, some cancer reseacher (not me tho !!) will find that splenda causes some problem. I refuse to use aspertame tho since it changes to formaldehyde which is carcinogenic in the way it is broken down and I have smelled enuf of that stuff to last a lifestime (ie in labs, etc.) Not to mention that while the FDA and Health Canada agree it is a carcinogen, they still think its byproducts are in toxic enough levels. I do not agree - or at least I refuse to take the chance. Even Monsanto - who bought Searle, the co that created the stuff, has funded studies showing it is highly toxic. I met the guy who created Splenda and while no long term studies have yet to be done (the product being too new), it is sucralose and at least no biochemical byproducts are known carcinogens. We'll see what it does in the long term tho. I don't drink enuf of it to worry tho, lol (But I won't touch aspertame with a ten foot pole, so to speak)

Mostly tho I drink oridinary bottled water -as do my cats. I have made the mistake of looking at my tap water under the microscope and did not like all those critters - tho admittedly there were fewer than pond water and they are prob innocuous enuf. I am not looking at bottled water under the mic, lol

LM1313
July 16th, 2006, 04:35 PM
I do think that fear (of strangers, kidnappers, rapists, etc) leads to kids being overly sheltered and never doing a thing on their own until they hit high school. Some parents won't let twelve and thirteen year olds walk to the store alone anymore! Kids have to be with their parents at every waking moment, never let out of their sight. But I'm not sure what can be done to encourage independence, because there ARE rapists, molestors, etc. out there, so what can you do? (There were in previous generations too, but the parents didn't think of it as a serious threat then.)

On an interesting note, my mom babysits and she's found that kids now get a TON more homework than I did in first-, second-, and third-grade. (At least at this particular school . . . the one babysat kids go to is the same as the one I went to.) It's ridiculous . . . a first-grader should not have three to four hours of homework every night! For God's sake, leave them some time to be KIDS!

We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, and the worms did not live in us forever.

:eek: Did kids seriously eat dirt?

I realize this isn't a "serious" thread and it was fun to read the original post. :) But if we didn't feel there was a grain of truth involved, what would be the point of posting it? That's why it's important to examine things like this and think: "How much of this is true? And is this a complete truth?"

Because it's easy to look back and say, "Man, those were the good old days, weren't they? They were so much better than now." But sometimes you have to look again and think to yourself, "Didn't grandpa mention how there were ten kids born the year he was and by high school he was the only one left alive?" (which is true of my father, born in the early 30s--the others all had various daredevil accidents and died). Or "You know, not only was no one upset over lawsuits back then, but I'll bet they weren't upset if their kids called a black person a n*****, either."

People don't get better or worse, they just switch out one bad trait for another. :evil:

CyberKitten
July 16th, 2006, 06:45 PM
Yep, I guess "the good old days" is a matter of personal perspective. I have fond memories - no, I never ate dirt, lol - but I do think we are doing better in terms of better health care, education, etc, etc (I could go on but do not want to belabour the point). That said, we live in a different society - a more complicated one than the one we (or I at least) grew up in and so parents are naturally more protective, most parents anyway. Not all from what I see on a daily basis.

That said, it occurs to me (thinking on type here, lol) that while we never wore sunscreen and those of us with skin cancer know that all too well, our fast paced lifestyle combined with "fast food" and video games/TV/computers will mean an epedemic in diabetes and overweight people. I am often shocked at how overweight many children are now!! (Unlike us, they don't ride their bikes everywhere, play skip in the middle of the street or school yard). Many however are involved in sports but what about those who are not?

So, the adults of the future will have serious medical issues to deal with but they may be (hopefully) at a decreased risk for skin cancer. There is too little labelling of products and many ppl think they are protected when they in fact are not. The best product (most recommended by dermotologists) is Ombrelle. Given our seeming carelessness re the enviroment, there will still be cancer - and I have to diagree with you Prin. DDT was banned only in 1968 in the US and later in some Canadian jurisdictions so we will see the results of that for some time. And we have been using organophosphates just as badly, sighhhhhhhhh!! You can still go into a hardware store and buy 2-4D which as you must know from your biology courses, is part of the Agent Orange combo(2-4-5-T being the other). There are times I am so angry I want to do serious damage to whoever invented this stuff!!! Never mind all the radiation and nuclear power!! And has anyone checked the atomic clock in the Bulletin of Atmic Scientists recently? We are not far from midnight - and this situation in the middle east scares me to no end!!

You should see the children I have treated from Kiev!!! (after Chernoble). I won't go into that because I have hone offtrack again but anyway... let's get back to the innocence of our youth, lol (It is much more relaxing, lol)

rainbow
July 16th, 2006, 07:49 PM
Me too !! Thanks for sharing !:)


Me three !!! :D